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Jim Leyland

SPORTS
June 4, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The soap opera that has become the Dodgers continued Wednesday with new story lines and plot twists, but the central theme was unchanged: turmoil. Fred Claire, executive vice president, again was compelled to clarify his status, and that of Manager Bill Russell, in response to a published report regarding their supposed pending dismissals.
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SPORTS
May 13, 1998 | From Associated Press
Jim Leyland says he doesn't want to manage the Florida Marlins next year if their payroll is reduced to $12 million, a possible target disclosed recently by team President Don Smiley. Smiley, organizing a group of investors to buy the team, plans another drastic reduction in the payroll for the 1999-2001 seasons, with a goal of $12 million to $16 million.
SPORTS
April 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
It's only the second week of the season, but Jim Leyland has seen enough. After Florida's sixth consecutive loss Monday, an 8-5 defeat by Milwaukee, Leyland said he will send Felix Heredia, 21, back to the bullpen and try a four-man rotation, three of them rookies. Heredia (0-2) gave up seven runs--five earned--in 4 2/3 innings, leaving him with an 8.38 earned-run average for two starts.
SPORTS
October 27, 1997 | ROSS NEWHAN
The ghosts of Francisco Cabrera and Steve Avery and all the chilling Octobers of Pittsburgh past were laid to rest Sunday night. Jim Leyland went the distance. The Florida Marlin manager went the distance in more ways than one, in fact.
SPORTS
October 27, 1997 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newcomers approached the table cautiously. Then their owner, needing to win big quickly, put a lot on the line and rolled the dice. On Sunday night, the Florida Marlins hit baseball's ultimate jackpot.
SPORTS
October 24, 1997 | ROSS NEWHAN
On the message boards at Pro Player Stadium in Miami, as a way of firing up Florida Marlin fans before the first pitch, they play a clip from the movie "Network" in which Peter Finch, as the aggrieved anchorman Howard Beale, screams, "I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore." Jim Leyland knows the feeling. The Marlins manager was admittedly mad as hell Thursday night and definitely not going to have the Marlins or Cleveland Indians or this World Series maligned anymore.
SPORTS
October 17, 1997 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tough guy that he is, Jim Leyland doesn't quit. The first-year Florida Marlin manager remains focused no matter the situation, and his players realize they had better as well. Or else. Leyland won't tolerate anything less than complete dedication, because he expects that of himself. And fortunately for South Florida, the Marlins haven't disappointed Leyland. They have followed their intense leader's lead, overcoming obstacles because Leyland told them they could.
SPORTS
October 16, 1997 | JASON REID
The embrace lasted only seconds. Bobby Bonilla and Jim Leyland hugged and whispered a few words to each other Tuesday night, sharing one of many special moments after the Marlins clinched the National League championship series against the Braves. Though the moment was short, Bonilla said it was significant for him and his manager. "Just a lot of emotion out there," the Marlin third baseman said. "I've been here with [Leyland] before so this was very special."
SPORTS
April 4, 1997 | From Associated Press
A game after becoming the first Pittsburgh manager to win his debut since Harry Walker did in 1965, Gene Lamont faced what his friend and predecessor Jim Leyland did so many times the last several seasons. The Pirates' 7-5 loss on Thursday to the Giants gave them a split in their season-opening series. What helped the Giants end an eight-game home losing streak to Pittsburgh was Jeff Kent, who matched a career-high with five RBIs. Then the Giants withstood Mark Johnson's first grand slam.
SPORTS
October 6, 1996 | Bill Plaschke
Now that the world knows what the Angels are thinking--and what splendid thoughts those are--there is no longer a question of how they should act. They wanted their manager to be Jim Leyland? Then they should fill that vacancy with Jim Fregosi. They offered Leyland nearly $2 million a year, including stock options and house and vacation packages? They could get Fregosi for the bit about the stock. He's the sort who would use his office for a house and his dugout for a vacation.
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