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Jim Lott

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SPORTS
January 3, 1988 | JEFF MEYERS and Los Angeles Times, Times Staff Writer
Jim Lott muttered to himself. Another snafu, but not totally unexpected. Playing football in Mexico was never without its problems. So, when Lott and his team of Los Angeles semi-pro football players arrived in Tijuana for a friendly game against the local muchachos , Lott was upset but not surprised that the high school field was being used for a soccer game.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
Hospital owner Pacific Health Corp. said it will close its three remaining Southern California hospitals, citing the fallout from a federal fraud case last year in which the company admitted paying to recruit homeless people off skid row in Los Angeles and billing the government for unnecessary care. The Tustin company said the three hospitals shutting down are Los Angeles Metropolitan Medical Center, Bellflower Medical Center and Newport Specialty Hospital. Last week, Pacific Health announced the closure of Anaheim General Hospital.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
Hospital owner Pacific Health Corp. said it will close its three remaining Southern California hospitals, citing the fallout from a federal fraud case last year in which the company admitted paying to recruit homeless people off skid row in Los Angeles and billing the government for unnecessary care. The Tustin company said the three hospitals shutting down are Los Angeles Metropolitan Medical Center, Bellflower Medical Center and Newport Specialty Hospital. Last week, Pacific Health announced the closure of Anaheim General Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
To survive the unprecedented challenges coming with federal healthcare reform, California hospitals are upending their bedrock financial model: They are trying to keep some patients out of their beds. Hospital executives must adapt rapidly to a new way of doing business that will link finances to maintaining patients' health and impose penalties for less efficient and lower-quality care. It's too soon to know precisely how the changes will affect patients. But experts say more will be treated in clinics and doctors' offices than in hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1999
Re "Care, Not Hospital Size," editorial, June 21: You assert that "many nonprofit hospitals in the county that receive substantial tax breaks for operating in the public interest do not in fact accept many indigent patients." On what facts do you base this assertion? Just how much free care do you believe a tax-exempt hospital should provide? You also urge "state legislators should wield a powerful tool--the public Medi-Cal and Medicare funding that private and nonprofit hospitals receive--to compel these institutions to accept more indigent patients."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Lakewood Regional Medical Center last week joined a small but growing number of Southern California hospitals that allow patients to make emergency room appointments online. In exchange for a fee, instead of sitting in a waiting room wondering how long they'll have to wait, users can show up at the assigned time with the assurance they will be seen within 15 minutes or get their money back. In a region where it's routine for emergency room patients at public hospitals to wait half a day or longer to be treated ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
To survive the unprecedented challenges coming with federal healthcare reform, California hospitals are upending their bedrock financial model: They are trying to keep some patients out of their beds. Hospital executives must adapt rapidly to a new way of doing business that will link finances to maintaining patients' health and impose penalties for less efficient and lower-quality care. It's too soon to know precisely how the changes will affect patients. But experts say more will be treated in clinics and doctors' offices than in hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New England had Robert Frost. The South had Robert Penn Warren. Harlem had Langston Hughes. And the Leona Valley, a pristine swath of cattle ranches and cherry orchards 25 miles north of Santa Clarita, has Jim Lott. The 86-year-old rancher with heavily calloused hands has composed more than 5,000 odes to rural life in the high desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2002 | CARA MIA DiMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 68 years, the golden cupola of St. Luke Medical Center has been a familiar landmark in northeast Pasadena, helping guide people to one of the two hospitals that bookend the city of 134,000 people. But in April, St. Luke will close its doors, the latest in a string of Southern California hospitals that have shut down, merged or been sold in recent years because of money problems. St. Luke stopped admitting nonemergency patients Thursday and will close its emergency room April 3.
OPINION
August 22, 2005
Your Aug. 18 editorial "King/Drew: Jabs and cuts" admonished the opponents of the county's plan to cut services at King/Drew Medical Center for "repeating charges of racism and sexism that have characterized their position so far." Earlier you identified the King/Drew advisory board as having rejected this plan. It is my sincere hope that you did not mean to imply that this group of healthcare experts appointed by county officials to advise them on issues related to this troubled hospital had alleged racism or sexism in expressing its opposition to the proposed service cuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Lakewood Regional Medical Center last week joined a small but growing number of Southern California hospitals that allow patients to make emergency room appointments online. In exchange for a fee, instead of sitting in a waiting room wondering how long they'll have to wait, users can show up at the assigned time with the assurance they will be seen within 15 minutes or get their money back. In a region where it's routine for emergency room patients at public hospitals to wait half a day or longer to be treated ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1999
Re "Care, Not Hospital Size," editorial, June 21: You assert that "many nonprofit hospitals in the county that receive substantial tax breaks for operating in the public interest do not in fact accept many indigent patients." On what facts do you base this assertion? Just how much free care do you believe a tax-exempt hospital should provide? You also urge "state legislators should wield a powerful tool--the public Medi-Cal and Medicare funding that private and nonprofit hospitals receive--to compel these institutions to accept more indigent patients."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New England had Robert Frost. The South had Robert Penn Warren. Harlem had Langston Hughes. And the Leona Valley, a pristine swath of cattle ranches and cherry orchards 25 miles north of Santa Clarita, has Jim Lott. The 86-year-old rancher with heavily calloused hands has composed more than 5,000 odes to rural life in the high desert.
SPORTS
January 3, 1988 | JEFF MEYERS and Los Angeles Times, Times Staff Writer
Jim Lott muttered to himself. Another snafu, but not totally unexpected. Playing football in Mexico was never without its problems. So, when Lott and his team of Los Angeles semi-pro football players arrived in Tijuana for a friendly game against the local muchachos , Lott was upset but not surprised that the high school field was being used for a soccer game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1997
Your April 1 editorial ("Birth Pains for Medi-Cal's Shift to Managed Care") erred with the assertion that health care providers get the $75 per month allotted by the state for each Medi-Cal patient in the program whether or not they actually see the patient. The actual amount that physicians, hospitals, pharmacists and other caregivers get to share is $56 because the state has allowed L.A. Care (the plan administrator) and its health plan partners to retain 25% of its $75 rate for administration and profit.
SPORTS
September 25, 1991 | JEFF MEYERS
Does the emergence of a new L.A.-area semipro football league bother Jim Lott? "I've seen seven leagues go under," said Lott, who founded the High Desert Football League 55 years ago. "They always make fun of us, but the next year, they're not in business and we are." Lott, 86, has taken several potshots from Bo Brooks, who pulled his Ventura County Cardinals out of the HDFL after the 1989 season and started the Southern California Football League.
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