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Jim Mccloskey

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MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, Ted Rohrlich is a Times staff writer.
IN THE BASEMENT OF AN OFFICE building across the street from Princeton University, an iconoclastic Protestant minister is patiently searching through a box of files on a 17-year-old Los Angeles murder case. The case was solved long ago to the satisfaction of the police and the courts. Two men were convicted and are serving life terms. But James McCloskey, the only full-time operative of Centurion Ministries, and not incidentally one of the nation's best detectives, thinks they are the wrong men.
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NEWS
January 30, 2000 | MARTHA RAFFAELE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jim McCloskey remembers the rage boiling inside him as he read the paper on the train to work one morning in 1978. An 11-year-old girl in a Philadelphia housing project had been raped and stabbed to death with an ice pick. A man named Matthew Connor had been charged. "I hope they burn that son of a gun," McCloskey recalls thinking.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1997 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt's case did not fit the mold of those the Rev. Jim McCloskey takes on. Pratt was a public figure whose case had attracted any number of high-profile supporters over the years. McCloskey's Princeton, N.J.-based Centurion Ministries specializes in helping what he calls anonymous prisoners he is convinced are innocent, "those who have no voice. They are just buried alive in prison."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1997 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt's case did not fit the mold of those the Rev. Jim McCloskey takes on. Pratt was a public figure whose case had attracted any number of high-profile supporters over the years. McCloskey's Princeton, N.J.-based Centurion Ministries specializes in helping what he calls anonymous prisoners he is convinced are innocent, "those who have no voice. They are just buried alive in prison."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1994 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has tried for parole 12 times--and been denied. Amnesty International has tried to win him a new trial. Political luminaries and even one of the jurors who convicted him say he deserves another chance. But Elmer (Geronimo) Pratt's best hope for freedom may have finally arrived in the person of a crusading clergyman who specializes in exonerating the "convicted innocent."
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clarence Chance and Benny Powell walked into Los Angeles County Superior Court as handcuffed prisoners Wednesday and left as free men--released by a judge after spending 17 years behind bars for a murder that the district attorney is no longer convinced they committed. The dramatic ruling by Judge Florence-Marie Cooper capped an extraordinary series of events for Chance and Powell, who were convicted in 1975 of killing a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy two years earlier.
NEWS
March 9, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventeen years ago, Clarence Chance and Benny Powell were convicted of murdering a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy and carted off to prison to serve life sentences. Now, they are on the verge of being freed--not because their time is up, but because authorities are no longer convinced that they committed the crime.
MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990 | Ted Rohrlich
NO ONE KNOWS FOR SURE HOW MANY wrongful convictions occur each year. In a recent survey by C. Ronald Huff, director of the criminal justice research center at Ohio State University, more than two-thirds of the lawyers, judges and law-enforcement officials asked said they believed that the error rate for convictions is less than 1%. A mistake rate even that high would result in 6,000 wrongful felony convictions a year in the United States. Francis J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid allegations that its officers may have framed two innocent men in the murder of a sheriff's deputy, the Los Angeles Police Department on Monday launched its own review of new evidence that has prompted the district attorney to ask that the men be freed after 17 years in prison. "We want to see what it is that has convinced them that they are no longer going to support the case," said LAPD Cmdr. Robert Gil. "We just want to make sure that it is being looked at from all sides."
MAGAZINE
February 10, 1991
The investigation of facts should not be left to individual citizens, such as McCloskey. There are other solutions to seeing to it that no one who is innocent gets incarcerated. An agency can be created within the administrative context of the criminal courts to investigate facts as they pertain to an accusation of guilt before any court appearance of the accused. Such fact-finding would also eliminate the often ridiculous game-playing by the prosecution and the defense. A more immediate solution would be to fire any civil servant who perjures himself or who is a party to suppressing or altering evidence in favor of a defendant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1994 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has tried for parole 12 times--and been denied. Amnesty International has tried to win him a new trial. Political luminaries and even one of the jurors who convicted him say he deserves another chance. But Elmer (Geronimo) Pratt's best hope for freedom may have finally arrived in the person of a crusading clergyman who specializes in exonerating the "convicted innocent."
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clarence Chance and Benny Powell walked into Los Angeles County Superior Court as handcuffed prisoners Wednesday and left as free men--released by a judge after spending 17 years behind bars for a murder that the district attorney is no longer convinced they committed. The dramatic ruling by Judge Florence-Marie Cooper capped an extraordinary series of events for Chance and Powell, who were convicted in 1975 of killing a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy two years earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid allegations that its officers may have framed two innocent men in the murder of a sheriff's deputy, the Los Angeles Police Department on Monday launched its own review of new evidence that has prompted the district attorney to ask that the men be freed after 17 years in prison. "We want to see what it is that has convinced them that they are no longer going to support the case," said LAPD Cmdr. Robert Gil. "We just want to make sure that it is being looked at from all sides."
NEWS
March 9, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventeen years ago, Clarence Chance and Benny Powell were convicted of murdering a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy and carted off to prison to serve life sentences. Now, they are on the verge of being freed--not because their time is up, but because authorities are no longer convinced that they committed the crime.
MAGAZINE
February 10, 1991
The investigation of facts should not be left to individual citizens, such as McCloskey. There are other solutions to seeing to it that no one who is innocent gets incarcerated. An agency can be created within the administrative context of the criminal courts to investigate facts as they pertain to an accusation of guilt before any court appearance of the accused. Such fact-finding would also eliminate the often ridiculous game-playing by the prosecution and the defense. A more immediate solution would be to fire any civil servant who perjures himself or who is a party to suppressing or altering evidence in favor of a defendant.
MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990 | Ted Rohrlich
NO ONE KNOWS FOR SURE HOW MANY wrongful convictions occur each year. In a recent survey by C. Ronald Huff, director of the criminal justice research center at Ohio State University, more than two-thirds of the lawyers, judges and law-enforcement officials asked said they believed that the error rate for convictions is less than 1%. A mistake rate even that high would result in 6,000 wrongful felony convictions a year in the United States. Francis J.
NEWS
January 30, 2000 | MARTHA RAFFAELE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jim McCloskey remembers the rage boiling inside him as he read the paper on the train to work one morning in 1978. An 11-year-old girl in a Philadelphia housing project had been raped and stabbed to death with an ice pick. A man named Matthew Connor had been charged. "I hope they burn that son of a gun," McCloskey recalls thinking.
MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, Ted Rohrlich is a Times staff writer.
IN THE BASEMENT OF AN OFFICE building across the street from Princeton University, an iconoclastic Protestant minister is patiently searching through a box of files on a 17-year-old Los Angeles murder case. The case was solved long ago to the satisfaction of the police and the courts. Two men were convicted and are serving life terms. But James McCloskey, the only full-time operative of Centurion Ministries, and not incidentally one of the nation's best detectives, thinks they are the wrong men.
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