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Jim Mcelreath

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SPORTS
September 7, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago Thursday, the first California 500 for Indy cars was run at Ontario Motor Speedway before 180,233 spectators, called at the time the largest attendance at any sporting event in California. Jim McElreath, driving a backup Coyote-Ford owned by A.J. Foyt, won the race at an average speed of 160.106 m.p.h. and collected $156,000 from a purse of $727,500. The attendance, the speed and the payoff were never bettered at Ontario.
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SPORTS
September 7, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago Thursday, the first California 500 for Indy cars was run at Ontario Motor Speedway before 180,233 spectators, called at the time the largest attendance at any sporting event in California. Jim McElreath, driving a backup Coyote-Ford owned by A.J. Foyt, won the race at an average speed of 160.106 m.p.h. and collected $156,000 from a purse of $727,500. The attendance, the speed and the payoff were never bettered at Ontario.
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SPORTS
February 15, 2000 | Associated Press
Tony Bettenhausen, the youngest son in a famous auto racing family, died in a plane crash Monday. He was 48. Bettenhausen, who drove Indy cars before becoming a CART team owner, his wife, Shirley, and two associates were killed when their small plane crashed about noon on a farm 30 miles from Lexington, Ky., said Brad Stevens, an executive with Bettenhausen Motorsports in Indianapolis. Shirley Bettenhausen was the daughter of longtime Indy car driver Jim McElreath.
SPORTS
September 6, 1999
It was one record, nearly everyone agreed, that would never fall. The decades rolled by and no one challenged Lou Gehrig's consecutive games played streak of 2,130. It was deemed unassailable. After all, other than Gehrig, only four players had ever played in 1,000 consecutive games. From 1925 to 1939, Gehrig played despite broken fingers, sprained ankles, headaches, flu, sore backs. . . no wonder they called him "The Iron Horse." Then came Cal Ripken Jr.
SPORTS
May 12, 1989
Recipients of the Jigger Award, given each year by the American Auto Racing Writers & Broadcasters Assn. to the person or organization who had the worst luck, or the worst time, in the month before the 500: 1969--Jigger Sirois, who started it all. 1970--Tony Adamowicz, who had three good laps and was on his way to a solid qualifying run when a yellow light flashed on momentarily by mistake. Adamowicz slowed and ultimately missed the race. 1971--John Mahler, who qualified his car and was later replaced as driver by car owner Dick Simon "because of sponsor commitments."
SPORTS
November 27, 1995 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Les Richter's California Speedway headquarters in the Empire Towers, he can look out his eighth-story window and see remnants of the late Ontario Motor Speedway--a few yards of dirt berm along what was the old front straightaway. Richter is the project manager for Roger Penske, who is planning to build a $70-million motor racing facility less than three miles from the Ontario track. The irony is not lost on Walt Czarnecki, president of Penske Speedway Inc.
NEWS
December 29, 1999
1900-1909 Barney Oldfield, pictured, America's most famous race driver of the era, became the first to drive a mile-a-minute on a one-mile dirt track when he took his Winton Bullet around Agricultural Park-- now Exposition Park and the Coliseum site--in 54.6 seconds on Nov. 22, 1903. * 1910-1919 The first board track in the country was built at Playa del Rey and opened April 8, 1910. It was a perfect circle, which gave it the name, "the Pie Pan."
SPORTS
February 28, 1985
Sprint car veterans Bubby Jones and Dean Thompson, rumored to be on the brink of retirement, will be back at it again this year in the Kraco-California Racing Assn. series. They have won the last five championships, Jones in 1983 and 1984, and Thompson in 1980, 1981 and 1982. The CRA, the oldest sprint car association in the country, will open its 40th season this weekend at the California Mid-Winter Fair on the Imperial County Fairgrounds' 3/8-mile dirt oval in El Centro.
SPORTS
October 28, 1998 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indy car races in the Inland Empire are nothing new. As long ago as 1913, there were races in Corona, and counting those held at Riverside International Raceway, Ontario Motor Speedway and last year's inaugural Marlboro 500 at Fontana's California Speedway, Sunday's will be the 32nd in the area. The first was run Sept. 9, 1913, when the Corona road race was part of the AAA national championship schedule. It was run on Grand Boulevard, a street laid out in a perfect three-mile circle.
SPORTS
May 24, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
If Hollywood were scripting the Lyn St. James story, there would be a few small but significant changes. First of all, no one would know she was a woman. You remember all those old Irene Dunne or Doris Day films where the leading lady would upsweep her long hair under a cloth cap, remove her earrings, hide her curves under a baggy suit and, for nine reels, no one would be supposed to know this person was a woman.
SPORTS
May 11, 1993 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When an Indiana sportswriter dubbed Ralph Liguori "Ralphie the Racer" several decades ago, it was hardly a compliment. Liguori, after all, was the answer to a trivia question: Who tried hardest to get in the Indianapolis 500 and never made it? From 1959 to 1968 he came to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway from Tampa to make the race. He never made it to the starting line.
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