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Jim Murray S Column

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June 5, 1988 | ALEX RAKSIN
This is a collection of dramatic contrasts. One day, Jim Murray's column is extraordinarily sensitive: "I have left the ramparts for the soft center," he writes after selling his beach house for a home in the city, "I have left the sunset land and wild acres for the sedate, the secure."
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SPORTS
August 18, 1998 | J.A. ADANDE
When Jim Murray put his hands on the keyboard it was like Babe Ruth stepping in the batter's box, Frank Sinatra taking the stage, Charlie Parker putting the saxophone to his lips. If that seems like a pale imitation of Jim Murray's writing, that's because it is. Pretty much every sports column written for the last 30 years has been a cheap knockoff of Murray, the best, the greatest, the king.
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SPORTS
December 19, 1987
In response to Jim Murray's column, "Howls Over the Heisman Voting Nothing New," Murray makes the common mistake of judging the past Heisman balloting based on the player's subsequent performances in the pro ranks. The trophy is not given to the player who is predicted to do the best in professional football, but rather to the player who has had the most outstanding college performance in that year . By Murray's methodology, the voters would need crystal balls to foresee the professional football superstars.
SPORTS
November 15, 1997
Finally someone in the media has said what should have been said long ago. Jim Murray's column of Nov. 6 was right on. Why should taxpayers help finance one nickel of a stadium so an owner with more money than God can go and pay some athlete huge amounts of money? As Murray said, why not spend money on cancer research, higher education or a new center for government? I cannot understand how any sports owners could ask taxpayers to pay for a new state-of-the-art stadium, or how any American taxpayer would ever vote for such a thing.
SPORTS
July 8, 1989
Jim Murray's column on the "Darkest Sin" clarified the Pete Rose affair. Sometimes, the darkest sin is ignorance. MARY M. MOORE Van Nuys
SPORTS
January 5, 1985
Re Jim Murray's column on Mike Ditka: I was at that Coliseum game many years ago and it was not a drunk that Ditka forearmed into oblivion; it was a boy who was playing wise guy and ran into the Bears' huddle. The punch, in full view of 75,000 fans was greeted with shock and ultimately many minutes of booing. The game had to be held up because of the noise, dissatisfaction and disbelief over Ditka's display of brutality. Since that day, I have always been a great fan of Ditka's opponents.
SPORTS
April 15, 1989
It has been 17 years since my father passed away. Jim Murray's column (April 14) made me realize how much I really miss him. Yes, he drank a lot. He drank to kill the pain of arthritis in his hips and ankles. He was a good father, stern but fair, and loyal to his wife, family and friends. He had a tremendous dislike of phony people and could spot them from a mile away. He also never forgot an injustice. His loves were the game of football and his roses. As we grew up we learned early on--don't bother him during a football game and don't play around the flowers.
SPORTS
October 24, 1992
As a Canadian, I feel it's my duty to write this letter. Jim Murray's column of Oct. 21 contains several jokes directed at my homeland, and because we Canadians are just a bunch of backwoods, ice-fishing, maple syrup-sucking cretins, I thought I'd explain some of Mr. Murray's witticisms to my fellow Canadians so that we can all enjoy a good laugh. (An American friend explained them to me.) Let's start with his remarks regarding the Canadian flag incident. "It's just a picture of a weed," Murray states.
SPORTS
August 8, 1987
Reader G.R. Turgeon, in his critique of Jim Murray's column on Bob Gibson, mentioned a number of pitchers' earned-run averages that were lower than Gibson's 1.12 in 1968. As a critic, however, he, too, proves human. How else to explain his unforgivable omission of Ferdinand M. Schupp's ERA of 0.90 for the 1916 New York Giants? JAMES B. DOWLING Torrance
SPORTS
May 2, 1987
I am no radical feminist, but the women's movement has raised my consciousness to a certain degree. Such consciousness was hit smack between the eyes today by Jim Murray's column on Mary Decker Slaney (April 21). Murray made some valid points, but he was way off base when he commented: "In a sport practiced by a lot of women who look as if they should be running tugboats, Mary looks as if she just stepped off the runway at Givenchy's." Such irresponsible reporting is a slap in the face to woman athletes, and Murray should be censured for such commentary.
SPORTS
October 24, 1992
As a Canadian, I feel it's my duty to write this letter. Jim Murray's column of Oct. 21 contains several jokes directed at my homeland, and because we Canadians are just a bunch of backwoods, ice-fishing, maple syrup-sucking cretins, I thought I'd explain some of Mr. Murray's witticisms to my fellow Canadians so that we can all enjoy a good laugh. (An American friend explained them to me.) Let's start with his remarks regarding the Canadian flag incident. "It's just a picture of a weed," Murray states.
SPORTS
July 8, 1989
Jim Murray's column on the "Darkest Sin" clarified the Pete Rose affair. Sometimes, the darkest sin is ignorance. MARY M. MOORE Van Nuys
SPORTS
April 15, 1989
It has been 17 years since my father passed away. Jim Murray's column (April 14) made me realize how much I really miss him. Yes, he drank a lot. He drank to kill the pain of arthritis in his hips and ankles. He was a good father, stern but fair, and loyal to his wife, family and friends. He had a tremendous dislike of phony people and could spot them from a mile away. He also never forgot an injustice. His loves were the game of football and his roses. As we grew up we learned early on--don't bother him during a football game and don't play around the flowers.
SPORTS
December 10, 1988
It is my understanding that the Heisman Trophy is given to the best college football player, not the best pro prospect. To imply that Barry Sanders doesn't deserve the trophy because his team played some very bad teams (Jim Murray's column, Dec. 2) is ludicrous. Sanders may have gotten a lot of his yards against inferior teams, but he also had great games against Nebraska, Oklahoma, Colorado and Texas A&M. He was truly outstanding. He deserves the award. Please don't demean his receiving of it. JAMES R. EWING Santa Monica
BOOKS
June 5, 1988 | ALEX RAKSIN
This is a collection of dramatic contrasts. One day, Jim Murray's column is extraordinarily sensitive: "I have left the ramparts for the soft center," he writes after selling his beach house for a home in the city, "I have left the sunset land and wild acres for the sedate, the secure."
SPORTS
December 19, 1987
In response to Jim Murray's column, "Howls Over the Heisman Voting Nothing New," Murray makes the common mistake of judging the past Heisman balloting based on the player's subsequent performances in the pro ranks. The trophy is not given to the player who is predicted to do the best in professional football, but rather to the player who has had the most outstanding college performance in that year . By Murray's methodology, the voters would need crystal balls to foresee the professional football superstars.
SPORTS
July 18, 1987
Jim Murray's column on former Dodger executive Al Campanis was neither amusing nor illuminating; it was a disgusting piece that angers me greatly. For reasons beyond my comprehension, Murray appears to be serving as an apologist for the words (and deeds) of Campanis. According to Murray, Campanis was "confused" the evening of April 6 when, appearing on the "Nightline" program, he spoke of the "lack of necessities" which, he contended, bars blacks from front office and on-field managerial positions in baseball.
SPORTS
August 15, 1987
Reader G.R. Turgeon, in his critique of Jim Murray's column on Bob Gibson, mentioned a number of pitchers' earned-run averages that were lower than Gibson's 1.12 in 1968. As a critic, however, he, too, proves human. How else to explain his unforgivable omission of Ferdinand M. Schupp's ERA of 0.90 for the 1916 New York Giants? JAMES B. DOWLING Torrance
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