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Jim Nantz

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SPORTS
January 28, 2008 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Jim Nantz has seen Tom Brady's competitiveness up close. The CBS sportscaster, honored by the Orange County Youth Sports Foundation as its sportsman of the year at a banquet in Anaheim Saturday night, talked about playing golf with the Super Bowl-bound New England Patriots quarterback in May 2006 at Kennebunkport, Maine. The other members of their foursome were George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton. With a friendly wager on the line, the golfers switched partners every six holes, a common practice.
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SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Teddy Greenstein
You know the sound a golf gallery makes when a five-foot birdie putt lips out? Ohhhhhhhhh. That's the groan that also accompanied the news that a rehabbing Tiger Woods would miss the Masters for the first time since 1994. That year, Jose Maria Olazabal triumphed on a 6,925-yard course, and Woods was voted "most likely to succeed" by classmates at Western High in Anaheim. Without Woods, there's no "Will he pass Jack Nicklaus" talk. There's less buzz. Fewer casual fans will tune in. CBS' Jim Nantz, during an appearance on "The Dan Patrick Show," called Woods' absence "the story that dwarfs all others.
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SPORTS
March 31, 2006 | LARRY STEWART
Jim Nantz has the routine down by now. This is the 21st year the CBS announcer will go straight from the Final Four to the Masters. "I'm scheduled to arrive in Augusta on Tuesday around lunchtime," Nantz said. "Only I probably won't have time for lunch. I'll go right to work." Nantz said that, ideally, he'd like a little more space between these two major events. "I'd love some breathing room," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Joe Flint
There has been no outcry against CBS from viewers angry with the network's unintentional airing of Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco swearing while celebrating the team's Super Bowl win, according to a senior executive at the network. "We've gotten a handful of complaints [but] there are more people asking questions about the blackout," said Martin Franks, executive vice president of planning, policy and government affairs for CBS. In an interview, Franks said the only way the network could have avoided picking up Flacco's swearing would have been to put the entire game on a tape delay.
SPORTS
February 2, 2004 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
As Jim Nantz stood on the sideline near the end of the Super Bowl, he couldn't quite believe what was happening. He had predicted during the pregame show that the game would go into overtime -- a first for a Super Bowl. On the pregame show, Nantz also said that Ricky Proehl would catch a key touchdown pass for the Carolina Panthers, but Adam Vinatieri would kick the winning field goal for the Patriots. "I had to look down and gather myself," Nantz said in the CBS complex after the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The first thought that went through CBS Sports Chairman Sean McManus' mind when the lights went out during Sunday's Super Bowl telecast was whether this was a network problem or a Superdome problem. "It was a surreal situation," McManus said in an interview Monday. Since he was in a production truck, McManus initially wasn't sure whether only CBS had lost power or if something bigger had happened. "We lost all communication to announcers and had to call (play-by-play announcer) Jim Nantz on his cellphone.
SPORTS
April 8, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
Suppose the national broadcast of Game 7 of the World Series began with an 0-and-2 count on the fourth batter in the top of the third inning. Suppose the Super Bowl came to you live, on third and 13 from the Denver 27 with 1:43 left in the first quarter--minus the two-hour pregame show, the two-hour prelude to the pregame show and the one-hour post-pregame show analysis and wrap-up show. (Not that that would be a bad thing, necessarily--only an unusual thing.
SPORTS
May 30, 1997 | LARRY STEWART
CBS has scored a major victory, announcing Thursday that it has re-signed announcer Jim Nantz to a five-year contract. Nantz for some time was telling friends he was headed for ABC to, among other things, become a host of "Good Morning, America." He reportedly was told the show would have more of a sports presence with him, originating from the British Open and other sites of major ABC events, such as the Triple Crown horse races.
SPORTS
February 14, 1998
Your staff people in Nagano are very lucky. They could enjoy the opening ceremony without the constant chattering of Jim Nantz throughout the "Ode to Joy." Does CBS think that sports fans are too dumb or uneducated to enjoy Beethoven? I hope someone from CBS reads this so they can tell Nantz and company to shut up during the closing ceremony. AUDREY B. FOLEY Claremont It may have been "An Opening With Appeal," as the headline stated, but not on CBS, which botched the opening royally, just as it has the rest of the Olympics.
SPORTS
July 2, 2004 | LARRY STEWART
In the 1960s and for much of the '70s, NBC's Curt Gowdy was everywhere -- announcing the Rose Bowl, the Super Bowl, the NCAA tournament, baseball, the World Series, and pro and college football. Brent Musburger and Pat Summerall became omnipresent at CBS, as did Jim McKay and Keith Jackson at ABC. But then the networks began shying away from having one or two main announcers. In an era of escalating rights fees, salaries became an issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The first thought that went through CBS Sports Chairman Sean McManus' mind when the lights went out during Sunday's Super Bowl telecast was whether this was a network problem or a Superdome problem. "It was a surreal situation," McManus said in an interview Monday. Since he was in a production truck, McManus initially wasn't sure whether only CBS had lost power or if something bigger had happened. "We lost all communication to announcers and had to call (play-by-play announcer) Jim Nantz on his cellphone.
SPORTS
March 15, 2011 | By Diane Pucin
Nothing says NCAA basketball mayhem like the words of Gus Johnson calling a down-to-the-wire game. "Coldblooded," Johnson howled Saturday when Washington's Isaiah Thomas, well, coldbloodedly ended the Pac-10 championship game in overtime against Arizona with a jump shot at the buzzer. UCLA fans still love to replay Johnson's call of the 2006 West Regional semifinal when the Bruins came from 17 points down to beat Gonzaga in the final seconds. "What a game!" Johnson screamed as Jordan Farmar made a steal and a pass to Luc Richard Mbah a Moute for a layup in the final seconds.
SPORTS
January 28, 2008 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Jim Nantz has seen Tom Brady's competitiveness up close. The CBS sportscaster, honored by the Orange County Youth Sports Foundation as its sportsman of the year at a banquet in Anaheim Saturday night, talked about playing golf with the Super Bowl-bound New England Patriots quarterback in May 2006 at Kennebunkport, Maine. The other members of their foursome were George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton. With a friendly wager on the line, the golfers switched partners every six holes, a common practice.
SPORTS
March 31, 2006 | LARRY STEWART
Jim Nantz has the routine down by now. This is the 21st year the CBS announcer will go straight from the Final Four to the Masters. "I'm scheduled to arrive in Augusta on Tuesday around lunchtime," Nantz said. "Only I probably won't have time for lunch. I'll go right to work." Nantz said that, ideally, he'd like a little more space between these two major events. "I'd love some breathing room," he said.
SPORTS
July 2, 2004 | LARRY STEWART
In the 1960s and for much of the '70s, NBC's Curt Gowdy was everywhere -- announcing the Rose Bowl, the Super Bowl, the NCAA tournament, baseball, the World Series, and pro and college football. Brent Musburger and Pat Summerall became omnipresent at CBS, as did Jim McKay and Keith Jackson at ABC. But then the networks began shying away from having one or two main announcers. In an era of escalating rights fees, salaries became an issue.
SPORTS
February 2, 2004 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
As Jim Nantz stood on the sideline near the end of the Super Bowl, he couldn't quite believe what was happening. He had predicted during the pregame show that the game would go into overtime -- a first for a Super Bowl. On the pregame show, Nantz also said that Ricky Proehl would catch a key touchdown pass for the Carolina Panthers, but Adam Vinatieri would kick the winning field goal for the Patriots. "I had to look down and gather myself," Nantz said in the CBS complex after the game.
SPORTS
March 29, 1991 | LARRY STEWART
It's interesting how things work out sometimes. Jim Nantz might be working as a civil engineer today rather than preparing to announce the Final Four for CBS had he never played golf at the Woodlands outside Houston in the summer of 1977. Nantz had just graduated from Marlboro High in New Jersey. A year earlier, his parents had moved to Houston, where his father started a wholesale furniture business. Jim stayed behind in Colts Neck, N.J., near Marlboro, living with a friend.
SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Teddy Greenstein
You know the sound a golf gallery makes when a five-foot birdie putt lips out? Ohhhhhhhhh. That's the groan that also accompanied the news that a rehabbing Tiger Woods would miss the Masters for the first time since 1994. That year, Jose Maria Olazabal triumphed on a 6,925-yard course, and Woods was voted "most likely to succeed" by classmates at Western High in Anaheim. Without Woods, there's no "Will he pass Jack Nicklaus" talk. There's less buzz. Fewer casual fans will tune in. CBS' Jim Nantz, during an appearance on "The Dan Patrick Show," called Woods' absence "the story that dwarfs all others.
SPORTS
January 30, 2004 | LARRY STEWART
It has been quite a week for Jim Nantz, and not just because he is the host of CBS' four-hour Super Bowl pregame show Sunday. This week has been a special homecoming for Nantz, one of incredible joy offset by deep sadness. He threw a party to beat all parties for the city Monday night. And every day since then, he has visited his father in a nursing home here. His father, who is actually Jim Jr.
SPORTS
April 8, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
Suppose the national broadcast of Game 7 of the World Series began with an 0-and-2 count on the fourth batter in the top of the third inning. Suppose the Super Bowl came to you live, on third and 13 from the Denver 27 with 1:43 left in the first quarter--minus the two-hour pregame show, the two-hour prelude to the pregame show and the one-hour post-pregame show analysis and wrap-up show. (Not that that would be a bad thing, necessarily--only an unusual thing.
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