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Jim Newton

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NEWS
March 26, 2014
Jim Newton is editor at large of the Los Angeles Times. He serves as a member of The Times' editorial board, advises on editorial matters and writes and edits for the editorial page and Op-Ed, including a weekly column examining the policy and politics of Southern California. Previously, he served as editor of the editorial pages, supervising the editorial board and overseeing its work as well as the Op-Ed page, Sunday Opinion and letters to the editor.  A veteran of the Los Angeles Times, he has worked as a reporter, editor and bureau chief and has covered, among other beats, the Los Angeles Police Department, the administration of Mayor Richard Riordan, federal law enforcement and state and local politics.  Newton came to the Los Angeles Times in 1989, having previously worked as a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and as a clerk at the New York Times, where he served as columnist James Reston's assistant from 1985-86.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 26, 2014
Jim Newton is editor at large of the Los Angeles Times. He serves as a member of The Times' editorial board, advises on editorial matters and writes and edits for the editorial page and Op-Ed, including a weekly column examining the policy and politics of Southern California. Previously, he served as editor of the editorial pages, supervising the editorial board and overseeing its work as well as the Op-Ed page, Sunday Opinion and letters to the editor.  A veteran of the Los Angeles Times, he has worked as a reporter, editor and bureau chief and has covered, among other beats, the Los Angeles Police Department, the administration of Mayor Richard Riordan, federal law enforcement and state and local politics.  Newton came to the Los Angeles Times in 1989, having previously worked as a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and as a clerk at the New York Times, where he served as columnist James Reston's assistant from 1985-86.
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SPORTS
February 5, 1997 | MICHAEL LAZARUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Newton has the frame offensive line coaches dream about. Slender at 6 feet 9 and 240 pounds, and possessing good footwork, the Newbury Park High senior could gain 50 pounds and become a prototypical college lineman. And he has the letters to prove it: three boxes full from Division I schools across the country. If things had worked out, Newton would be signing a letter of intent today, the first day of the national signing period for high school seniors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles riots were sparked by the acquittal 20 years ago of four police officers in the beating of Rodney King, but civil rights attorney Connie Rice says the kindling for the fire was laid years before, by decades of hostile policing in black neighborhoods. "The reason we had this riot was because we had the total emasculation and humiliation of an entire community," she said. "It was kindling built on kindling built on kindling. " Rice reflected on the riots Sunday at the L.A. Times Festival of Books along with former L.A. County Dist.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2008 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Editorial Page Editor Jim Newton, a 19-year veteran of the Los Angeles Times, will leave the newspaper to return to a book project that he postponed 14 months ago to take his current post, he and Times Publisher David Hiller said Tuesday. Hiller said that he expected to name a successor in the coming weeks and that Newton would stay on through July "to provide a good transition."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2007 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Times named Jim Newton, a veteran political and public policy journalist whose work has focused on California, editorial page editor Friday. In announcing the appointment, Times Publisher David D. Hiller called Newton "one of the leading reporters and commentators on politics and government in Los Angeles and in the state."
SPORTS
July 5, 1986
After seeing all the coverage by your newspaper and the furor in the Southland over the World Cup I really must say, wow what an exciting sport! What's next, the International World Championship cow-chip throwing contest? JIM NEWTON Hawthorne
OPINION
June 20, 2011 | Jim Newton
Last month, scores of public officials across Los Angeles County opened their mail to find nearly identical requests for information: Members of the Los Angeles City Council and the county Board of Supervisors, the Community Redevelopment Agency and Community College District Board of Trustees, the city of Long Beach and untold others were asked to produce records relating to the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy. It was the first blow, silently delivered, in what could be a nasty fight, of a sort that is becoming increasingly common in American and California politics.
OPINION
March 22, 2011 | Jim Newton
For the past dozen or so years, I had lunch every few months with Warren M. Christopher, Los Angeles' most enduring and consequential civic counselor. Our lunches were, in one sense, predictable. He would choose a top-notch restaurant ? Lucques was a particular favorite. He was always prompt, always impeccably dressed in British suits and silk ties set off by a neatly folded pocket square. He drank one glass ? never two ? of white wine, and finished his meal with espresso. He never had dessert.
OPINION
June 6, 2011 | Jim Newton
It is a source of fierce shame and more than a little defensiveness in Compton that the area's lone bastion of higher education, Compton Community College, lost its accreditation in 2005 after officials absconded with public money and the district came up short on its payroll. Six years later, however, there are signs of hope at the college, where a battle-scarred crop of leaders is fighting through threats of violence and howls of community protest but is at last confronting the truth.
OPINION
February 11, 2012
Responding to Jim Newton's column on Monday supporting a proposal by Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky to limit comments at L.A. County Board of Supervisors meetings, Los Angeles resident George Rheault wrote: "Newton doesn't mention that opportunities to speak directly to the supervisors, with a guarantee of at least a good chance of being heard by them, are virtually nonexistent outside meetings. "If the supervisors gave more respect to what their constituents had to say - perhaps by allowing more, not less, time - more reasonable folks would show up, the grandstanding attention-seekers would have less incentive to highlight the absurdities of a now less absurd show, and simple peer pressure would elevate the tone and substance of the comments.
OPINION
December 19, 2011
A water-wise S.F. Re "In S.F., a feud over use of water," Dec. 13 Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) has her facts muddled. The Tuolumne River is the source of San Francisco's water supply, not the Hetch Hetchy Valley. The reservoir is one of nine that San Francisco uses to store its water. Multiple studies have determined that using the Hetch Hetchy Valley is unnecessary and removing it from the system would result in a 4% loss of water. If San Francisco matched Orange County in developing sustainable local water supplies such as recycling, it could reduce its use of Tuolumne River water by up to 20%, easily offsetting what it would lose from Hetch Hetchy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2011 | By Richard Reeve, Special to Los Angeles Times
Eisenhower The White House Years Jim Newton Doubleday: 452 pp., $29.95 I liked Ike. He was my idol as he was to millions who were schoolboys when the hero of World War II was elected U.S. president. I remember writing an essay when I was a freshman in high school expressing regret that I was too young to vote for him in 1952. Of course, it did not hurt that I grew up in a Republican family immune to the charms and sophisticated rhetoric of Adlai Stevenson.
OPINION
June 20, 2011 | Jim Newton
Last month, scores of public officials across Los Angeles County opened their mail to find nearly identical requests for information: Members of the Los Angeles City Council and the county Board of Supervisors, the Community Redevelopment Agency and Community College District Board of Trustees, the city of Long Beach and untold others were asked to produce records relating to the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy. It was the first blow, silently delivered, in what could be a nasty fight, of a sort that is becoming increasingly common in American and California politics.
OPINION
June 13, 2011 | Jim Newton
In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, public safety leaders in Southern California concluded that the need for a unified emergency communications system was so grave that they had to build it in such a way as to avoid the traditional pitfalls for huge, multi-agency projects: sloppiness, recriminations and politics. Ten years later, they are on the verge of commissioning such a system, but their efforts are beset by sloppiness, recriminations and politics. The huge undertaking goes by the ungainly acronym LA-RICS, short for the unwieldy full name: The Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communications System.
OPINION
June 6, 2011 | Jim Newton
It is a source of fierce shame and more than a little defensiveness in Compton that the area's lone bastion of higher education, Compton Community College, lost its accreditation in 2005 after officials absconded with public money and the district came up short on its payroll. Six years later, however, there are signs of hope at the college, where a battle-scarred crop of leaders is fighting through threats of violence and howls of community protest but is at last confronting the truth.
OPINION
March 15, 2011 | Jim Newton
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has taken his lumps lately: The budget's a disaster, layoffs loom, the City Council defied him when he tried to sell off city parking lots and the Fire and Police Pensions board shrugged off his plea that it not increase city pension contributions. But the mayor remains in the fight, and nowhere is that more evident than in his commitment to the 21 schools he and his office help oversee. Early in his first term, the mayor tried to take control of Los Angeles schools; the Legislature gave him part of what he asked for, but the courts balked at even that.
OPINION
May 21, 2011 | Jim Newton
In Southern California, there's nothing like a very large piece of real estate to cause discord. And the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station is nothing if not a large piece of real estate. Ever since the military decided to unload the base in the 1990s, Orange County residents have been bickering over what to do with the land, and the decision in 2005 to turn it into the Great Park hasn't ended the conflict. But first the history. Even before the military moved out, county residents divided into two bitterly opposing camps: those who supported using the site for a commercial airport and those who envisioned it as a vast and impressive park.
OPINION
May 30, 2011 | Jim Newton
In the early positioning in the race to succeed Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, most of the political energy is being generated by two candidates who are fighting for long-shot status. Developer Rick Caruso and investment banker Austin Beutner both want to be regarded as the preeminent candidate appealing to Republicans in the race, a mixed blessing in one of the nation's most stalwartly Democratic cities. Why would anyone want to be a Republican standard-bearer in a city where you could fire a cannon down Broadway at rush hour and not put a single Republican at risk?
OPINION
May 21, 2011 | Jim Newton
In Southern California, there's nothing like a very large piece of real estate to cause discord. And the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station is nothing if not a large piece of real estate. Ever since the military decided to unload the base in the 1990s, Orange County residents have been bickering over what to do with the land, and the decision in 2005 to turn it into the Great Park hasn't ended the conflict. But first the history. Even before the military moved out, county residents divided into two bitterly opposing camps: those who supported using the site for a commercial airport and those who envisioned it as a vast and impressive park.
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