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Jim Paxon

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NATIONAL
June 30, 2002 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a week, the news has been dreadful. The nation's most destructive forest fire has been roaring through canyons and into wooded subdivisions and small mountain communities, incinerating more than 400 homes and forcing 30,000 people to flee. Those stricken by the grim news said that at least they found some comfort in hearing it from Jim Paxon, the Texan with the brush mustache who lays out the facts bluntly, sometimes with a lyrical twist, as a spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service.
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NATIONAL
June 30, 2002 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a week, the news has been dreadful. The nation's most destructive forest fire has been roaring through canyons and into wooded subdivisions and small mountain communities, incinerating more than 400 homes and forcing 30,000 people to flee. Those stricken by the grim news said that at least they found some comfort in hearing it from Jim Paxon, the Texan with the brush mustache who lays out the facts bluntly, sometimes with a lyrical twist, as a spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service.
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NEWS
March 13, 1989
The worst fire in the history of Big Bend National Park swelled to more than 1,200 acres, fueled by tinder-dry vegetation and fanned by wind blowing through canyons, authorities in Texas said. About 100 campers had been evacuated earlier. Ninety firefighters from several agencies battled the flames in the High Chisos mountains in southwest Texas, and spokesman Jim Paxon said three helicopters and 160 more firefighters were expected to arrive from other Western states by today.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
The lumbering Rodeo-Chediski fire has quieted near here, opening the possibility that the town's 7,700 residents will be allowed to return home in a few days, officials said Thursday. The fire, only 5% contained, has destroyed at least 423 homes in nearby mountain communities. The blaze had threatened to blow into the city since Saturday, and had crept to within half a mile of homes at the forest's edge. But as the fire stalled under cooler weather, it burned underbrush and lost its momentum, U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2002 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blaze in Sequoia National Forest continued to burn Monday, running up a rugged canyon east of the Kern River so remote firefighters could not even get in to assess the situation. "It's running and torching and crowning up through that basin," said Jim Paxon, spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service. "It's dense timber and brush. It's steep ground. Fire is going to get big in that area .... We can't even give you an estimate."
NATIONAL
June 26, 2002 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Firefighters Tuesday successfully staved off--at least for now--the massive wildfire that was threatening this mountain community, setting a series of back burns to stop flames approaching from the west and south. Crews burned underbrush beneath towering ponderosa pines, robbing oncoming flames of fuel. The optimistic turn occurred the same day that President Bush flew over the blaze, which has charred more than 375,000 acres.
NEWS
July 26, 2002 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sped by hot canyon winds, fueled by dry underbrush, the wildfire ignited swaths of Sequoia National Forest--and then began closing in on its ancient heart. On Thursday, the blaze had moved within two miles of a trail of giant sequoias, close enough for one expert to raise a stunning possibility: The grove could go up in flames.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano and Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
Jared Lee Loughner, accused in the deadly Tucson shootings, is believed to have taken target practice in the Arizona desert and was pulled over by a peace officer for running a red light before making his way to the Safeway supermarket where Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was holding a meeting with her constituents, law enforcement officials said Wednesday. In those early morning hours, Loughner was stopped and let go with a warning by an Arizona Game and Fish officer for creeping through a red light, six miles from the market where six people were killed and 13 injured, including Giffords, officials said.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2002 | Tom Gorman, Times Staff Writer
As a firefighting expert for the National Park Service, Jim Loach left his Omaha home and spent what he said were countless hours this past summer, mostly in Oregon, to help manage the efforts of thousands of hard-pressed firefighters. But it turned out Uncle Sam was counting his hours. Loach has been told he worked too much overtime and must pay back more than $12,000.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2002 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driven by the hope of good summertime work, a contract firefighter started what would turn into the worst wildfire in Arizona history, authorities alleged Sunday. Leonard Gregg, 29, a part-time firefighter for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, was one of the first summoned to combat the blaze. "This fire was started with a profit motive behind it," U.S. Atty. Paul Charlton said. Gregg was arrested Saturday night and appeared in federal court Sunday morning in Flagstaff, Ariz.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2002 | TOM GORMAN and STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As firefighters readied hoses to extinguish house fires Monday, crews frantically cut small pine trees behind homes at the forest edge in a desperate effort to slow a monstrous fire that marched to within a mile of this mountain town. The fire has destroyed at least 329 homes and 16 buildings in surrounding communities. It outpaced efforts to divert it from this city of 7,700 Saturday night, forcing residents to flee.
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