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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Oscar-winning screenwriter Jim Rash ("The Descendants") hosts Sundance Channel's series "The Writers' Room," a chatfest with scripters of such hit TV shows as "Game of Thrones," whose staff sits down with Rash on Monday. Rash also plays the energetic Dean Pelton on NBC's "Community," which has been picked up for a fifth season. How did "The Writers' Room" come about? It was a creation with Sundance in partnership with Entertainment Weekly, and they came to me wondering if I'd be interested in hosting a show that was an open panel discussion about the act of writing and particularly the inner workings of a writing staff on popular television shows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Fox has officially ordered the pilot for "Fatrick," which is backed by a hefty comedy lineup. The show is written by "Dont Trust the B---- in Apt 23" creator  Nahnatchka Khan and Corey Nickerson (co-executive producer of "Apt 23", "The Crazy Ones") and directed by Oscar winners Nat Faxon and Jim Rash ("The Descendants," "The Way Way Back"). The four will also executive-produce the series. FALL TV 2013: Watch the trailers The network had made a pilot production commitment in August to the project.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey
Readers flooded me with emails over the weekend; they couldn't say enough about the new indie "The Way, Way Back. " So I couldn't resist saying a bit more too. Don't miss one of this summer's pure pleasures. Written and directed by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, the film is full of fun, family insights and just enough of a burn to keep things interesting. Its terrific acting ensemble includes Steve Carell, Toni Collette and a deliciously naughty Allison Janney. But go for the heart - Sam Rockwell as Owen, the cool dude who runs the local kid-magnet, a water park.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Oscar-winning screenwriter Jim Rash ("The Descendants") hosts Sundance Channel's series "The Writers' Room," a chatfest with scripters of such hit TV shows as "Game of Thrones," whose staff sits down with Rash on Monday. Rash also plays the energetic Dean Pelton on NBC's "Community," which has been picked up for a fifth season. How did "The Writers' Room" come about? It was a creation with Sundance in partnership with Entertainment Weekly, and they came to me wondering if I'd be interested in hosting a show that was an open panel discussion about the act of writing and particularly the inner workings of a writing staff on popular television shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
Just two days into filming "The Way, Way Back," the delicate balance that first-time directors Nat Faxon and Jim Rash had carefully planned was already crumbling. Rain had forced them to change the schedule, pushing up the shooting of an indoor scene that was one of the very few in the movie in which both of them also had to act at the same time. The two knew the moment would come but had hoped to have much more experience directing before having to call the shots while in character.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
To begin talking about the new indie film "The Way, Way Back," I want to go way, way back. Praise for the movie's excellent cast, anchored by Sam Rockwell, Toni Collette, Steve Carell, Allison Janney and teenage rock Liam James, will come later. As good as the actors are, we must begin with the originality of the screenplay by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash. The writers, who also co-direct and have small roles in the film, take a fairly straightforward story of coming of age in a time of divorce, with all the frictions that arise as kids find themselves dealing with mom and dad's new loves, but they make it feel fresh.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a telling moment within the intimate family drama of "The Descendants" that has George Clooney running as if his life depended on it. As Matt King, he's an awkward sight pounding through his quiet neighborhood in flip-flops, Hawaiian shirt and shorts; laughable if that famous face were not so twisted by helplessness and hurt. You're not sure whether he is running from something or to something, or both. Just one scene, but powerfully reflective of the theme director Alexander Payne has coursing through this winning and warm-hearted film — that the hard truths of life are as impossible to escape as they are difficult to embrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2010
The Groundlings ? that petri dish nurturing tomorrow's comedic superstars ? bring the seasonal cheer with their annual Holiday Show, one seeking to divert your attention from all the reasons you might be down this time of year, from family strife to feeling bloated like a whale on rich festive fare. Damon Jones directs; the cast includes Jillian Bell, Nat Faxon, Ryan Gaul, David Hoffman, Steve Little, Laird Macintosh, Charlotte Newhouse and Jim Rash. Groundlings Theatre, 7307 Melrose Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. Fridays, 8 and 10 p.m. Saturdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI
The Groundlings' "When Groundlings Attack" is a sketch comedy and improv bill that won't launch a major assault on your funny bone, but it will give you a mild case of the giggles. The program tends toward the predictable, but the cast charges undaunted into creative characterizations. There's no real bomb, but there are no fireworks either.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | David C. Nichols
Mordant, up-to-the-minute wit fuels "City of the Future," scampering about the Groundlings Theater. This latest showcase from Los Angeles' celebrated comedy troupe is consistently twisted and often uproarious. One factor is director Patrick Bristow's swift deployment of his gonzo ensemble. These writer-performers (with alternates) scramble past the odd flat-footed bit or ad lib with patented ease. Their politically incorrect energy carries the evening, with an emphasis on grotesquerie.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
Just two days into filming "The Way, Way Back," the delicate balance that first-time directors Nat Faxon and Jim Rash had carefully planned was already crumbling. Rain had forced them to change the schedule, pushing up the shooting of an indoor scene that was one of the very few in the movie in which both of them also had to act at the same time. The two knew the moment would come but had hoped to have much more experience directing before having to call the shots while in character.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey
Readers flooded me with emails over the weekend; they couldn't say enough about the new indie "The Way, Way Back. " So I couldn't resist saying a bit more too. Don't miss one of this summer's pure pleasures. Written and directed by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, the film is full of fun, family insights and just enough of a burn to keep things interesting. Its terrific acting ensemble includes Steve Carell, Toni Collette and a deliciously naughty Allison Janney. But go for the heart - Sam Rockwell as Owen, the cool dude who runs the local kid-magnet, a water park.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
To begin talking about the new indie film "The Way, Way Back," I want to go way, way back. Praise for the movie's excellent cast, anchored by Sam Rockwell, Toni Collette, Steve Carell, Allison Janney and teenage rock Liam James, will come later. As good as the actors are, we must begin with the originality of the screenplay by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash. The writers, who also co-direct and have small roles in the film, take a fairly straightforward story of coming of age in a time of divorce, with all the frictions that arise as kids find themselves dealing with mom and dad's new loves, but they make it feel fresh.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a telling moment within the intimate family drama of "The Descendants" that has George Clooney running as if his life depended on it. As Matt King, he's an awkward sight pounding through his quiet neighborhood in flip-flops, Hawaiian shirt and shorts; laughable if that famous face were not so twisted by helplessness and hurt. You're not sure whether he is running from something or to something, or both. Just one scene, but powerfully reflective of the theme director Alexander Payne has coursing through this winning and warm-hearted film — that the hard truths of life are as impossible to escape as they are difficult to embrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2010
The Groundlings ? that petri dish nurturing tomorrow's comedic superstars ? bring the seasonal cheer with their annual Holiday Show, one seeking to divert your attention from all the reasons you might be down this time of year, from family strife to feeling bloated like a whale on rich festive fare. Damon Jones directs; the cast includes Jillian Bell, Nat Faxon, Ryan Gaul, David Hoffman, Steve Little, Laird Macintosh, Charlotte Newhouse and Jim Rash. Groundlings Theatre, 7307 Melrose Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. Fridays, 8 and 10 p.m. Saturdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | David C. Nichols
Mordant, up-to-the-minute wit fuels "City of the Future," scampering about the Groundlings Theater. This latest showcase from Los Angeles' celebrated comedy troupe is consistently twisted and often uproarious. One factor is director Patrick Bristow's swift deployment of his gonzo ensemble. These writer-performers (with alternates) scramble past the odd flat-footed bit or ad lib with patented ease. Their politically incorrect energy carries the evening, with an emphasis on grotesquerie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY
Going to the Groundlings is like getting in on the ground floor of the next generation of ascending sketch comedy talent. "Groundlings to Meet You, I'm Robert," ably continues the tradition, under Deanna Oliver's direction. Jeremy Rowley gets the biggest laughs. His first self-tailored showcase is a character he has done in previous Groundlings shows: an impossibly eccentric, high-voiced man who causes trouble in queues, this time at a Department of Motor Vehicles office.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Fox has officially ordered the pilot for "Fatrick," which is backed by a hefty comedy lineup. The show is written by "Dont Trust the B---- in Apt 23" creator  Nahnatchka Khan and Corey Nickerson (co-executive producer of "Apt 23", "The Crazy Ones") and directed by Oscar winners Nat Faxon and Jim Rash ("The Descendants," "The Way Way Back"). The four will also executive-produce the series. FALL TV 2013: Watch the trailers The network had made a pilot production commitment in August to the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI
The Groundlings' "When Groundlings Attack" is a sketch comedy and improv bill that won't launch a major assault on your funny bone, but it will give you a mild case of the giggles. The program tends toward the predictable, but the cast charges undaunted into creative characterizations. There's no real bomb, but there are no fireworks either.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY
Going to the Groundlings is like getting in on the ground floor of the next generation of ascending sketch comedy talent. "Groundlings to Meet You, I'm Robert," ably continues the tradition, under Deanna Oliver's direction. Jeremy Rowley gets the biggest laughs. His first self-tailored showcase is a character he has done in previous Groundlings shows: an impossibly eccentric, high-voiced man who causes trouble in queues, this time at a Department of Motor Vehicles office.
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