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Jim Ryun

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June 17, 1989 | CHRIS DEHNEL, The Greenwich Time
In a mystical sort of way, Jim Ryun sees the low point of his career as the turning point of his life. In was in 1972 at the Summer Olympic Games in Munich, West Germany. Ryun, a silver medalist in the 1968 Games, was the favorite in the first heat of the 1,500 meters. Five years earlier, he had been, arguably, the best miler in the world. But in 1972 he was completing a comeback from a state of semi-retirement by making the U.S. team. Ryun began the race well, and with about 500 yards to go was in good position to win it. Suddenly, he collided with Billy Fordjour of Ghana and tumbled, hitting his head on the metal guardrail.
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SPORTS
October 31, 2004 | From Associated Press
The knees, hips and ankles are still holding up. Jim Ryun is thankful for that at 57, a generation removed from the days when he held the world record in the mile. He also knows how foolish it would be to time himself on the track now. "I think I'd have to use a sundial instead of a stopwatch," he says. Ryun tries to run every day, but finds that hard to do during a campaign. He is up for re-election Tuesday, seeking a fifth term in Congress as a representative from Kansas.
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SPORTS
September 8, 2002 | Lauren Peterson
SEPT. 8, 1972: DAY 14 Ryun Takes Fall Jim Ryun, the king of middle-distance runners in 1968 after having gone undefeated for three years in the 1,500 meters and mile, finished second in Mexico City to Kenyan Kip Keino. The track world eagerly awaited a rematch in the Olympic final in 1972. It didn't happen. Ryun tripped and fell on the third lap of the opening round of the 1,500. He remained on the ground for at least eight seconds, then resumed running.
SPORTS
September 8, 2002 | Lauren Peterson
SEPT. 8, 1972: DAY 14 Ryun Takes Fall Jim Ryun, the king of middle-distance runners in 1968 after having gone undefeated for three years in the 1,500 meters and mile, finished second in Mexico City to Kenyan Kip Keino. The track world eagerly awaited a rematch in the Olympic final in 1972. It didn't happen. Ryun tripped and fell on the third lap of the opening round of the 1,500. He remained on the ground for at least eight seconds, then resumed running.
SPORTS
April 16, 1986 | Associated Press
Between 1966 and 1975, Jim Ryun was the world's best middle-distance runner. He set world records for the half-mile, the 1,500 meters and the mile. He was the first high school runner to break four minutes in the mile. He was a three-time Olympian, winning a silver medal. He was one of the most respected athletes in the world. But there was tremendous pressure on him, the pressure to win, the pressure to set world records.
SPORTS
June 22, 1991 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Ryun might have been America's greatest mile runner, but not even he could have guessed that his high school record would go unchallenged for 25 years. Ryun, already an Olympic veteran and three-time Kansas prep champion, was 18 and a graduate of Wichita East High when he set the record of 3 minutes 55.3 seconds on June 27, 1965, at the national AAU meet in San Diego. A month earlier, he had set the national high school federation record of 3:58.3 at the Kansas state meet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
If a young man wants to date 26-year-old Heather Ryun, it's not as simple as calling her on the phone. First, he must talk to her father. The two men pray and decide if the suitor is ready for marriage. If the answer is yes, then--and only then--can the couple begin dating. Normally, this would be nobody else's business. But Heather Ryun's father is Jim Ryun, the former Olympic runner and world record holder in the mile and now a Republican candidate for Congress.
SPORTS
March 15, 1987 | United Press International
Jim Ryun, the former world record-holder in the mile, will compete in the inaugural 2-mile Mini-Trevira April 25 in New York's Central Park, race officials have announced. Ryun, who will turn 40 four days after the race, must select a female partner for the event. Last year, he ran in the 10-mile Trevira Twosome with Jan Merrill, but Ryun dropped out after four miles because of a strained left alf muscle.
SPORTS
May 25, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
He was the best miler in the world for nine years. He was the world record-holder, also, in the 1,500 meters and in the 800 meters. He was an elegant runner who had the deceptive kick of Man o' War at the tape. He accelerated without seeming to. He was a cinch to become the first American to win the Olympic gold medal in the metric mile since 1908. What nobody knew was, Jim Ryun couldn't hear the cheers. Even more important, he was no more than even money to hear the gun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1993 | ED BOND
The man who for nine years held the record for running the fastest mile in the world stood in front of a class of sixth-graders Friday and remembered what it was like to be young and unsure of himself because of a disability. "When I was their age, I was afraid to ask questions," said Jim Ryun, after spending about an hour with the John Muir Middle School Tripod classes in which hearing and hearing-impaired students learn together. He left behind some inspiration and hope.
SPORTS
May 28, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Not since Jim Ryun was running during the 1960s has America seen a miler with the potential of Alan Webb. On Sunday, the unassuming 18-year-old senior from South Lakes High in Reston, Va., outdid Ryun, considered the greatest miler in U.S. history. Competing against some of the world's best milers, including world record-holder and Olympic 1,500-meter silver medalist Hicham El Guerrouj, the teenager put on a show worthy of an international star.
SPORTS
June 23, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a lap to go, prospects weren't good that the best miler in American history, Jim Ryun, would break his own world record of 3:51.3. This was Ryun's goal at the AAU championships in Bakersfield, 32 years ago. Ryun, a 20-year-old University of Kansas sophomore, had covered the half-mile in 1:59, well off his planned record pace of 1:56. And with nobody pacing him, he did it the hard way, by himself. After a third lap of 58.6 seconds, he streaked around the track on the last lap in 53.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
If a young man wants to date 26-year-old Heather Ryun, it's not as simple as calling her on the phone. First, he must talk to her father. The two men pray and decide if the suitor is ready for marriage. If the answer is yes, then--and only then--can the couple begin dating. Normally, this would be nobody else's business. But Heather Ryun's father is Jim Ryun, the former Olympic runner and world record holder in the mile and now a Republican candidate for Congress.
SPORTS
February 29, 1996 | MAL FLORENCE
Jack Ramsay, former NBA coach and general manager, recalling the many skills of Jerry West to Ken Wheeler of the Oregonian: "People forget how magnificent West was. He was everything. He could handle the ball, back you down and shoot jumpers over you. He could put it on the floor and either score or make the pass. He was everywhere on defense, and he could run the break.
SPORTS
June 5, 1993
I attended the University of Kansas at the same time as Jim Ryun (class of '69), and have followed his career ever since. Not until reading Jim Murray's column on May 25 was I aware that he had a hearing problem. I have admired Murray's work for more than 20 years and once again he has educated me. SUSAN FELICE Manhattan Beach To Jim Murray: I just got back from the Indianapolis 500 and opened my L.A. Times to the sports section. After reading the other stories, I turned to your column.
SPORTS
May 25, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
He was the best miler in the world for nine years. He was the world record-holder, also, in the 1,500 meters and in the 800 meters. He was an elegant runner who had the deceptive kick of Man o' War at the tape. He accelerated without seeming to. He was a cinch to become the first American to win the Olympic gold medal in the metric mile since 1908. What nobody knew was, Jim Ryun couldn't hear the cheers. Even more important, he was no more than even money to hear the gun.
SPORTS
June 5, 1993
I attended the University of Kansas at the same time as Jim Ryun (class of '69), and have followed his career ever since. Not until reading Jim Murray's column on May 25 was I aware that he had a hearing problem. I have admired Murray's work for more than 20 years and once again he has educated me. SUSAN FELICE Manhattan Beach To Jim Murray: I just got back from the Indianapolis 500 and opened my L.A. Times to the sports section. After reading the other stories, I turned to your column.
SPORTS
June 22, 1991 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES PREP SPORTS EDITOR
Jim Ryun might have been America's greatest mile runner, but not even he could have guessed that his high school record would go unchallenged for 25 years. Ryun, already an Olympic veteran and three-time Kansas prep champion, was 18 and a graduate of Wichita East High when he set the record of 3 minutes 55.3 seconds on June 27, 1965, at the national AAU meet in San Diego. A month earlier, he had set the national high school federation record of 3:58.3 at the Kansas state meet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1993 | ED BOND
The man who for nine years held the record for running the fastest mile in the world stood in front of a class of sixth-graders Friday and remembered what it was like to be young and unsure of himself because of a disability. "When I was their age, I was afraid to ask questions," said Jim Ryun, after spending about an hour with the John Muir Middle School Tripod classes in which hearing and hearing-impaired students learn together. He left behind some inspiration and hope.
SPORTS
June 22, 1991 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES PREP SPORTS EDITOR
Jim Ryun might have been America's greatest mile runner, but not even he could have guessed that his high school record would go unchallenged for 25 years. Ryun, already an Olympic veteran and three-time Kansas prep champion, was 18 and a graduate of Wichita East High when he set the record of 3 minutes 55.3 seconds on June 27, 1965, at the national AAU meet in San Diego. A month earlier, he had set the national high school federation record of 3:58.3 at the Kansas state meet.
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