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Jim Sasser

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996 | TOM PLATE, Tom Plate, whose column runs Tuesdays, has been traveling in Asia. His e-mail address is
Two very different kinds of U.S. action could help ease what Asian officials call "the tension" over the Taiwan Strait. Boldly, President Clinton should travel here for a summit. And very quietly, the new American ambassador, Jim Sasser, should work behind the scenes in the capital of the world's most populous nation to explain to the Chinese the mysterious ways of the U.S. Congress.
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NEWS
January 5, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James R. Sasser's initiation as the U.S. ambassador to China was a trial by fire that would have singed even the most experienced diplomat. The United States had been without an ambassador for eight months. Soon after Sasser arrived, China, hoping to intimidate voters in Taiwan--which it considers part of its territory--announced military exercises off the Taiwanese coast and moved troops and materiel, including missiles, into position. Sasser was not a diplomat, not by a long stretch.
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NEWS
December 2, 1988
Senate Democrats handed out committee assignments for the 101st Congress, with new leaders selected for two key panels that will deal directly with the budget deficit and the savings and loan crisis. Donald W. Riegle Jr. of Michigan was named chairman of the Banking Committee, succeeding William Proxmire of Wisconsin, and Jim Sasser of Tennessee will take over the Budget Committee from Lawton Chiles of Florida. Proxmire and Chiles retired. The Democrats gained one seat in the Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996 | TOM PLATE, Tom Plate, whose column runs Tuesdays, has been traveling in Asia. His e-mail address is
Two very different kinds of U.S. action could help ease what Asian officials call "the tension" over the Taiwan Strait. Boldly, President Clinton should travel here for a summit. And very quietly, the new American ambassador, Jim Sasser, should work behind the scenes in the capital of the world's most populous nation to explain to the Chinese the mysterious ways of the U.S. Congress.
NEWS
April 19, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
SHORT TAKES: GOP filibusters have Senate Democrats pinning a new curse word on Republicans: gridlocker . Sen. Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.) indignantly denied that he was one when Sen. Jim Sasser (D-Tenn.) suggested, in debate, that he certainly was. . . . A best-selling T-shirt shows Socks, the Clinton cat, sniffing a cherry blossom over the caption: "Socks Inhales." . . . Slick Willie's, a new proletarian eatery on Capitol Hill, features Razorback Meatloaf and The Big Willie, a hamburger.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | Associated Press
Sen. Jim Sasser (D-Tenn.) on Thursday entered the race to succeed Sen. George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) as majority leader. Sasser, 57, chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, is competing against Sen. Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) for the leadership post. Democratic senators will choose their new leader at the end of the year. Mitchell will retire from the Senate in January. Several other Democrats have recently declared that they would not seek Mitchell's job, including Sens. Wendell H.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
In another sign of a thaw in U.S.-China relations, President Clinton nominated former Democratic Sen. Jim Sasser of Tennessee to be the next U.S. ambassador to Beijing. The nomination came hours after China agreed to accept Sasser as Clinton's choice for the diplomatic post, which has been vacant since Stapleton Roy left three months ago. Sasser, 58, served in the Senate for 18 years, including as chairman of the Budget Committee.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Democratic Sen. Jim Sasser on Saturday criticized President Reagan's plan to protect Kuwaiti ships in the Persian Gulf as a provocation that could invite a disaster like the 1983 attack on U.S. Marines in Beirut. Giving the Democratic response to Reagan's weekly radio address, the Tennessee legislator--one of the most outspoken critics of the plan--said it is absurd to put U.S. flags on 11 Kuwaiti oil tankers while leaving U.S.-owned ships unprotected.
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | Associated Press
Iran won't be intimidated by U.S. or Soviet ships in the Persian Gulf, and it's "just a matter of time" before an American ship is attacked, a senator who just returned from the region said today. Responding to plans by the Reagan Administration for the Navy to escort Kuwaiti tankers flying American flags in the gulf, Sen. Jim Sasser (D-Tenn.) said on NBC-TV's "Today" show: "I think it's just a matter of time until the Iranians do (attack a U.S.-flag ship).
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
The agency that manages federal aircraft has lost track of how many civilian planes the government has and what they are used for, investigators at the agency have discovered. The inspector general's office of the General Services Administration unearthed 237 federal aircraft unknown to the GSA by checking Federal Aviation Administration records, according to the report, which was obtained by the Associated Press.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As military tensions continue to mount between China and Taiwan, new U.S. Ambassador James R. Sasser on Wednesday formally presented his credentials to China's President Jiang Zemin, ending an awkward eight-month period in which the United States had no ambassador to the world's most populous country. The former Democratic senator from Tennessee, who has been taking cram courses in Mandarin Chinese, will be tested immediately by the continuing fragility of the U.S.-Chinese relationship.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
In another sign of a thaw in U.S.-China relations, President Clinton nominated former Democratic Sen. Jim Sasser of Tennessee to be the next U.S. ambassador to Beijing. The nomination came hours after China agreed to accept Sasser as Clinton's choice for the diplomatic post, which has been vacant since Stapleton Roy left three months ago. Sasser, 58, served in the Senate for 18 years, including as chairman of the Budget Committee.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | D'Jamila Salem
Thirty five Senate seats, 36 governorships and all 435 House seats are up for grabs today. Here is a score card to help you keep track of the winners and losers as the GOP attempts to regain control of the Senate. Senate Dems listed first (i)=incumbent Leading Virtually Tonight's in polls tied in polls winner Ariz. Sam Coppersmith Jon Kyl x Calif. Dianne Feinstein (i) x Mike Huffington Conn. Joseph Lieberman (i) x Jerry Labriola Del. Charles M. Oberly William V. Roth Jr. (i) x Fla.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | From The Times Washington Bureau
YOU OK, SADDAM? In a Time magazine interview this week, President Clinton recalled a day in the eighth grade when he decked a bully after warning him to stop pushing him around. Clinton drew a parallel between that incident and his decision to deploy U.S. military forces against Iraqi and Haitian military strongmen who didn't heed his warnings. But according to Clinton friends, there is a bit more to the story of that old schoolboy punch.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | Associated Press
Sen. Jim Sasser (D-Tenn.) on Thursday entered the race to succeed Sen. George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) as majority leader. Sasser, 57, chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, is competing against Sen. Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) for the leadership post. Democratic senators will choose their new leader at the end of the year. Mitchell will retire from the Senate in January. Several other Democrats have recently declared that they would not seek Mitchell's job, including Sens. Wendell H.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
The agency that manages federal aircraft has lost track of how many civilian planes the government has and what they are used for, investigators at the agency have discovered. The inspector general's office of the General Services Administration unearthed 237 federal aircraft unknown to the GSA by checking Federal Aviation Administration records, according to the report, which was obtained by the Associated Press.
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Sen. Jim Sasser, on a fact-finding mission to the area of the devastating Iraqi attack on the guided-missile frigate Stark, said Monday that "the United States will not tolerate any armed attack on American ships by any nation." The Tennessee Democrat's remarks were clearly aimed at Iraq and Iran, belligerents in the Persian Gulf War, now nearly seven years old. An Iraqi missile strike May 17 killed 37 American sailors on the U.S. Navy warship.
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