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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1993 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Seeley was on his cellular phone, somewhere within the limestone confines of Capitol Hill, urgently reporting on a mini-legislative coup for Los Angeles. "Hey, remember that percentage thing on the police officer money I told you about? We got the 50/50 split we wanted! It was slipped in at the last moment," Seeley related in his buddy-buddy conversational style.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1993 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Seeley was on his cellular phone, somewhere within the limestone confines of Capitol Hill, urgently reporting on a mini-legislative coup for Los Angeles. "Hey, remember that percentage thing on the police officer money I told you about? We got the 50/50 split we wanted! It was slipped in at the last moment," Seeley related in his buddy-buddy conversational style.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's proposed 1992 budget would send money to the San Fernando Valley area for parkland, defense systems and decontamination at Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory. The $1.4-trillion spending proposal includes $11.5 million to buy land in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, the same amount that Bush included in his 1991 budget.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though investors and other observers were quick to handicap winners and losers Friday a day after Senate passage of a telecom reform bill, veterans of the long struggle to overhaul the nation's 61-year-old communications laws say the die is not yet cast. For starters, there were so many amendments added in the waning hours of debate on the bill--more than 20--that many lobbyists, legislative aides and others said they are not even clear on all the details of the measure.
NEWS
February 8, 2000 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal budget President Clinton unveiled Monday included a surprise request of $50 million to help the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority relieve overcrowding on its troubled bus system. The budget also contains a laundry list of other proposals to benefit California, such as money to start building a federal courthouse in Los Angeles, to buy parkland in the Santa Monica Mountains and to preserve Southern California desert land.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Educators would get more federal help to start charter schools. Immigrants trying to cross the border illegally would face tighter surveillance. And efforts to conserve Pacific salmon river habitat would get a major boost. Those are just a few of the nuggets culled from the budget President Clinton released Monday that could affect California. Of course, the full impact of the proposed spending plan on the nation's most populous state will not be known for some time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1993 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Honberger is the closest thing Ventura County has to a full-time lobbyist in the nation's capital. While San Diego County is his largest, most time-consuming client, Honberger manages to look out for the interests of Ventura County. Over the past eight years, Honberger has tracked new federal rules and legislation for county officials, tipping them to developments that would affect the county.
NEWS
February 7, 1985 | KAREN TUMULTY and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writers
California would be the major beneficiary of the military buildup proposed in the Reagan Administration's fiscal 1986 budget, but critics charged Wednesday that the windfall would not protect the state from the effects of dramatic cuts proposed for social programs. Children, the poor, the elderly and the disabled would be hurt the worst, contended Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez), a member of the House Budget Committee. "Lockheed doesn't have an application window for those people. . . .
NEWS
August 3, 1986 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Paul Sweet, the University of California's full-time representative here, remembers a conversation he had with one of his counterparts from the South. It was an exchange that illustrates why California entities may need all the help they can get in Washington. The man told Sweet that Southern schools need more federal help than California's because, "You have a larger tax base. We have poor people in our state."
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