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September 30, 2007 | Tara Ison, Tara Ison is the author, most recently, of "The List."
Battles for conquest from ancient Greece to Sputnik-era outer space; landscapes spanning the Australian desert and the Himalayan heights; the anxious inner lives of a man debating a vasectomy or the head executioner of revolutionary France -- such is the stunning breadth of the 11 stories in Jim Shepard's new collection, "Like You'd Understand, Anyway."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
You Think That's Bad Stories Jim Shepard Alfred A. Knopf: 226 pp., $24.95 It's not that Jim Shepard isn't known, exactly; it's that he isn't known enough. Although his 2007 collection of short fiction, "Like You'd Understand, Anyway," was a finalist for the National Book Award, he has never fully caught on with readers — his work is too diverse, too out there, too plain unclassifiable to find a place among the silos that define so much of our conversation about writers and books.
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February 24, 1994 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
In shock when her husband walks out with no more explanation than a scrawled note tucked under the telephone, Joanie Mucherino lives in the bell jar of depression: nothing but white noise and white silence. Her high school students pity her; on the other hand, a friend once told her that people are responsible for the bad things that happen to them. Twelve years of marriage have reduced her world to her job, her 11-year-old son, her relatives and a neighbor or two.
BOOKS
September 30, 2007 | Tara Ison, Tara Ison is the author, most recently, of "The List."
Battles for conquest from ancient Greece to Sputnik-era outer space; landscapes spanning the Australian desert and the Himalayan heights; the anxious inner lives of a man debating a vasectomy or the head executioner of revolutionary France -- such is the stunning breadth of the 11 stories in Jim Shepard's new collection, "Like You'd Understand, Anyway."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2004 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
With stories involving famous rock bands, classic horror movies, even historic disasters, writer Jim Shepard has found a way to compete with the faster, flashier entertainments of today. But the question remains: What is the role of literature in a world that seems to have passed it by?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
You Think That's Bad Stories Jim Shepard Alfred A. Knopf: 226 pp., $24.95 It's not that Jim Shepard isn't known, exactly; it's that he isn't known enough. Although his 2007 collection of short fiction, "Like You'd Understand, Anyway," was a finalist for the National Book Award, he has never fully caught on with readers — his work is too diverse, too out there, too plain unclassifiable to find a place among the silos that define so much of our conversation about writers and books.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can there be any doubt that novelists are possessed by their subjects? We know Jim Shepard, author of "Battling Against Castro," "Kiss of the Wolf," "Lights Out in the Reptile House" and others, to be a mild-mannered, precise writer. Indeed, "Nosferatu" has many of these stylistic attributes, but all too close to the surface burns the hypnotic, viral spirit of the vampire. This novel is out of control, completely infected by that spirit. The plot glides and shudders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1988
A fire Tuesday burned through the roof of an East Los Angeles commercial building that housed a carport manufacturing company and an engine rebuilding firm, causing $750,000 damage, officials said. The blaze, which began about 11:45 a.m., raged through an attic and then through the roof of the building at 5221 E. Olympic Blvd., county Fire Department spokesman Jim Shepard said. The fire was extinguished at 1:31 p.m., he said. There were no reports of injuries.
BOOKS
February 16, 1997
Rachel Ashwell, founder, Shabby Chic: "Flaubert-Sand: The Correspondence" edited by Alphonse Jacobs (Alfred A. Knopf). "There is a really lovely perspective on life in these pages, one rarely seen in this day and age." **** Mike R. Bowlin, chairman and chief executive officer, Arco: "The Killer Angels" by Michael Shaara (Ballantine). "An excellent book about Gettysburg, character and leadership. I particularly liked the portrayal of Robert E.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2004 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
With stories involving famous rock bands, classic horror movies, even historic disasters, writer Jim Shepard has found a way to compete with the faster, flashier entertainments of today. But the question remains: What is the role of literature in a world that seems to have passed it by?
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can there be any doubt that novelists are possessed by their subjects? We know Jim Shepard, author of "Battling Against Castro," "Kiss of the Wolf," "Lights Out in the Reptile House" and others, to be a mild-mannered, precise writer. Indeed, "Nosferatu" has many of these stylistic attributes, but all too close to the surface burns the hypnotic, viral spirit of the vampire. This novel is out of control, completely infected by that spirit. The plot glides and shudders.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
In shock when her husband walks out with no more explanation than a scrawled note tucked under the telephone, Joanie Mucherino lives in the bell jar of depression: nothing but white noise and white silence. Her high school students pity her; on the other hand, a friend once told her that people are responsible for the bad things that happen to them. Twelve years of marriage have reduced her world to her job, her 11-year-old son, her relatives and a neighbor or two.
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Novelist Denis Johnson's "Tree of Smoke," a story drawn from the Vietnam War, was nominated Wednesday for the 2007 National Book Award in fiction, along with two first-time novelists and two short story writers. Essayist Christopher Hitchens was nominated in the nonfiction category for "God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything," as was Edwidge Danticat's memoir of the Haitian diaspora, "Brother, I'm Dying," and Tim Weiner's "Legacy of Ashes," about the history of the CIA.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Kristina Lindgren; David L. Ulin; Nick Owchar
"Get hooked on a banned book." That's the American Library Assn.'s mantra for Banned Books Week, which begins Saturday. "Part of living in a democracy means respecting each other's differences and the right of all people to choose for themselves what they and their families read," Judith F. Krug, director of the ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom, said in a statement.
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