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Jim Sheridan

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January 2, 1994 | ALLEN BARRA, Allan Barra writes about the arts for Newsday and the Village Voice.
Jim Sheridan isn't exactly sure what it is that he's done, but he's absolutely certain that what he hasn't done is make a film about the Irish Republican Army. Members of the British press, most of whom haven't yet seen "In the Name of the Father," seem convinced that he has. One London paper, the Evening Standard, suggested that Emma Thompson might be stigmatized for her decision to appear in it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014 | by Greg Braxton
WGN America has ordered the 10-part scripted series "Ten Commandments" from Weinstein Co. The ambitious project, to be shown over 10 nights, will feature 10 noted filmmakers, each putting a modern interpretation on a different commandment. Gus Van Sant ("Milk"), Lee Daniels ("Lee Daniels' 'The Butler' "), Jim Sheridan ("In the Name of the Father"), Wes Craven ("Scream") and Michael Cera ("Juno") are among the filmmakers signed to the series. Oscar-winning producer Bruce Cohen and Bob Weinstein will produce.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014 | by Greg Braxton
WGN America has ordered the 10-part scripted series "Ten Commandments" from Weinstein Co. The ambitious project, to be shown over 10 nights, will feature 10 noted filmmakers, each putting a modern interpretation on a different commandment. Gus Van Sant ("Milk"), Lee Daniels ("Lee Daniels' 'The Butler' "), Jim Sheridan ("In the Name of the Father"), Wes Craven ("Scream") and Michael Cera ("Juno") are among the filmmakers signed to the series. Oscar-winning producer Bruce Cohen and Bob Weinstein will produce.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Danish filmmaker Susanne Bier's excellent tragedies tend to feature the sorts of characters and conflicts that turn up in her newest movie, "Love Is All You Need. " We meet a heartbroken widower, a breast-cancer survivor, an unfaithful husband, an estranged son, another headed off to war, a bulimic teenager and witness a wedding that is threatening to implode. But this time, the writer-director has used her favorite themes to whip up a frothy confection and set it to Dean Martin's mellow "That's Amore.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1997 | Susan King, Susan King is a Times staff writer
Emily Watson has been counting her blessings. "I've been incredibly lucky with the roles that have been coming my way," she says. "I am kind of on a bit of a roll." Indeed. The 30-year-old British actress illuminated the screen last year in her first film, "Breaking the Waves." Watson received a best actress Oscar nomination for her performance as a distraught wife. Watson has been working almost nonstop since then.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1990 | PETER RAINER
This year's quintet of Oscar nominees for Best Director is a mix of hifalutin' pile drivers, stage-based phenoms and lapidary craftsmen. As Academy slates go, it's slightly better than most. Only two of the choices make me twitch, Oliver Stone, for "Born on the Fourth of July," and Peter Weir for "Dead Poets Society."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The movies--individually and as an industry--have not lost their capacity to surprise. Few would have predicted a year ago that a film about an autistic savant would dominate the critics' awards and then the Oscars. Even fewer, I suspect, would have predicted that a film about a severely crippled cerebral palsy victim would win honors from the critics' groups this year and could well show up in the Academy Award nominations Feb. 14.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Danish filmmaker Susanne Bier's excellent tragedies tend to feature the sorts of characters and conflicts that turn up in her newest movie, "Love Is All You Need. " We meet a heartbroken widower, a breast-cancer survivor, an unfaithful husband, an estranged son, another headed off to war, a bulimic teenager and witness a wedding that is threatening to implode. But this time, the writer-director has used her favorite themes to whip up a frothy confection and set it to Dean Martin's mellow "That's Amore.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2003 | Jon Matsumoto, Special to The Times
Jim Sheridan is a born storyteller, with a particular knack for stories that examine the human condition. Although the Irish writer-director has told them to great effect in films ranging from "My Left Foot" to "In the Name of the Father," one story he hadn't told on film was his own. With "In America" (which opened Wednesday at the Monica in Santa Monica and the Grove Stadium 14), Sheridan, 54, has made what he considers his most personal -- and personally revealing -- movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2009 | By Geoff Boucher
No one does a better impression of Irish filmmaker Jim Sheridan than his old friend Bono. On a recent crystal-blue afternoon in L.A., the rock star, who was in town for a concert at the Rose Bowl, lifted his shoulders, dropped his chin and scowled like Popeye. He slapped a palm to his forehead and began rubbing hard, like a man trying to sandpaper off an eyebrow. Then in a growled brogue, he muttered: "Do you want to have a look at the pitch-chur? It's a ting about brud-ders." Yes, the new Sheridan picture is "Brothers," and it's a thing about family, the nature of duty, war, guilt and calamity of the human heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2010 | By Susan King
Travel the globe this week in the comfort of a darkened theater. The first stop is Ireland, courtesy of the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre, where the country's premier filmmaker, Jim Sheridan, is scheduled to discuss his career and screen his current film, "Brothers," and his well-regarded 2003 drama " In America" on Friday. Two more well-regarded Sheridan films -- with Daniel Day-Lewis -- keep us in the Emerald Isle on Saturday: 1989's "My Left Foot," for which Day-Lewis received his first Academy Award, as painter Christy Brown, and 1993's "In the Name of the Father," for which the actor earned an Oscar nomination as a man unjustly accused of an IRA pub bombing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2009 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
Director Jim Sheridan sets the table early on for everything that will unfold in "Brothers." It's a last supper of sorts for the Cahill family, featuring Tobey Maguire as older brother Sam, a Marine captain returning to Afghanistan, and Tommy (Jake Gyllenhaal), younger by a few years, a roguish reprobate just out of jail. Though it is Sam's experiences on the frontlines that will ultimately sear and shred the Cahills, dinner turns out to be not a bad starting point. As is often the case in Sheridan's movies, family dynamics will actually be the main course with old fights and simmering resentments served alongside rolls and the rest.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2009 | By Geoff Boucher
No one does a better impression of Irish filmmaker Jim Sheridan than his old friend Bono. On a recent crystal-blue afternoon in L.A., the rock star, who was in town for a concert at the Rose Bowl, lifted his shoulders, dropped his chin and scowled like Popeye. He slapped a palm to his forehead and began rubbing hard, like a man trying to sandpaper off an eyebrow. Then in a growled brogue, he muttered: "Do you want to have a look at the pitch-chur? It's a ting about brud-ders." Yes, the new Sheridan picture is "Brothers," and it's a thing about family, the nature of duty, war, guilt and calamity of the human heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2003 | Jon Matsumoto, Special to The Times
Jim Sheridan is a born storyteller, with a particular knack for stories that examine the human condition. Although the Irish writer-director has told them to great effect in films ranging from "My Left Foot" to "In the Name of the Father," one story he hadn't told on film was his own. With "In America" (which opened Wednesday at the Monica in Santa Monica and the Grove Stadium 14), Sheridan, 54, has made what he considers his most personal -- and personally revealing -- movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1997 | Susan King, Susan King is a Times staff writer
Emily Watson has been counting her blessings. "I've been incredibly lucky with the roles that have been coming my way," she says. "I am kind of on a bit of a roll." Indeed. The 30-year-old British actress illuminated the screen last year in her first film, "Breaking the Waves." Watson received a best actress Oscar nomination for her performance as a distraught wife. Watson has been working almost nonstop since then.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1994 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As advance screenings of major movies go, it wasn't exactly conventional. Only 5% of those invited showed up, and the film was temporarily halted halfway through because the audience had other important business to attend to. Yet the special screening this week for British lawmakers of Jim Sheridan's film "In the Name of the Father," held in Committee Room 20 at the seat of Britain's Parliament--Westminster's House of Commons--was widely judged a success.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2010 | By Susan King
Travel the globe this week in the comfort of a darkened theater. The first stop is Ireland, courtesy of the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre, where the country's premier filmmaker, Jim Sheridan, is scheduled to discuss his career and screen his current film, "Brothers," and his well-regarded 2003 drama " In America" on Friday. Two more well-regarded Sheridan films -- with Daniel Day-Lewis -- keep us in the Emerald Isle on Saturday: 1989's "My Left Foot," for which Day-Lewis received his first Academy Award, as painter Christy Brown, and 1993's "In the Name of the Father," for which the actor earned an Oscar nomination as a man unjustly accused of an IRA pub bombing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2009 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
Director Jim Sheridan sets the table early on for everything that will unfold in "Brothers." It's a last supper of sorts for the Cahill family, featuring Tobey Maguire as older brother Sam, a Marine captain returning to Afghanistan, and Tommy (Jake Gyllenhaal), younger by a few years, a roguish reprobate just out of jail. Though it is Sam's experiences on the frontlines that will ultimately sear and shred the Cahills, dinner turns out to be not a bad starting point. As is often the case in Sheridan's movies, family dynamics will actually be the main course with old fights and simmering resentments served alongside rolls and the rest.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1994 | ALLEN BARRA, Allan Barra writes about the arts for Newsday and the Village Voice.
Jim Sheridan isn't exactly sure what it is that he's done, but he's absolutely certain that what he hasn't done is make a film about the Irish Republican Army. Members of the British press, most of whom haven't yet seen "In the Name of the Father," seem convinced that he has. One London paper, the Evening Standard, suggested that Emma Thompson might be stigmatized for her decision to appear in it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1990 | PETER RAINER
This year's quintet of Oscar nominees for Best Director is a mix of hifalutin' pile drivers, stage-based phenoms and lapidary craftsmen. As Academy slates go, it's slightly better than most. Only two of the choices make me twitch, Oliver Stone, for "Born on the Fourth of July," and Peter Weir for "Dead Poets Society."
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