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Jim Sleeper

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July 28, 1991 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a Times national political correspondent.
These are the years of Willie Horton and Tawana Brawley, of Louis Farrakhan and David Duke, of Rodney King and the Central Park jogger, of quotas and code words, of politics sharpened to a lethal edge on the adamantine differences between black and white. Not since the 1960s have racial questions been so vivid and dense with emotion. Books about the urban underclass are nestled between the self-help manuals on the national best-seller lists.
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October 4, 1998 | JACKSON LEARS, Jackson Lears teaches American cultural history at Rutgers University. He is working on a book about gambling and luck in American history
One evening some 30 years ago, the Smothers Brothers sang "The Lord is Colorblind" to a nationwide television audience. The movement for black equality had not completely passed beyond its early, epic phase; racial integration remained a shining ideal in many Americans' minds. It was a long time ago. Imagine the reactions that song might evoke today--bafflement, embarrassment, derision. We have entered an era when awareness of race seems inescapable, part of the atmosphere we breathe.
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BOOKS
October 4, 1998 | JACKSON LEARS, Jackson Lears teaches American cultural history at Rutgers University. He is working on a book about gambling and luck in American history
One evening some 30 years ago, the Smothers Brothers sang "The Lord is Colorblind" to a nationwide television audience. The movement for black equality had not completely passed beyond its early, epic phase; racial integration remained a shining ideal in many Americans' minds. It was a long time ago. Imagine the reactions that song might evoke today--bafflement, embarrassment, derision. We have entered an era when awareness of race seems inescapable, part of the atmosphere we breathe.
MAGAZINE
July 28, 1991 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a Times national political correspondent.
These are the years of Willie Horton and Tawana Brawley, of Louis Farrakhan and David Duke, of Rodney King and the Central Park jogger, of quotas and code words, of politics sharpened to a lethal edge on the adamantine differences between black and white. Not since the 1960s have racial questions been so vivid and dense with emotion. Books about the urban underclass are nestled between the self-help manuals on the national best-seller lists.
NEWS
May 21, 1989
EDITOR: Davilynn Furlow DESIGN DIRECTOR: Donald Burgess ASSISTANT EDITOR: Sherry Angel COPY COORDINATOR: David N. Blume RESEARCHER: Kathie Bozanich HISTORICAL CONSULTANT: Jim Sleeper OPERATIONS DIRECTOR: Jefferson G. Stillwell ART PRODUCTION: Robert Stone EDITOR, ORANGE COUNTY EDITION: Narda Zacchino EDITORIAL DIRECTOR: WALLACE GUENTHER
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1985
It is not surprising that Santa Ana's Yost Theater is still "pending for permanent status on the National Register of Historic Places" (as you reported Feb. 23). If the applicants submitted the same 1928 photo you ran identifying it as "The Yost Theater on Spurgeon Street," it should be pending for quite a while. Your photo is of Yost's Broadway Theater, six blocks away, on Broadway Street, as the sign on the building clearly says. JIM SLEEPER Tustin
NEWS
August 12, 1991 | Marla Cone
BARE OF BEARS: A century ago, grizzly bears were as common in Orange County as wild pigs and wolves--which is to say they were very common. . . . The last of the great shaggy bears to roam these parts was trapped and killed in 1908 at Holy Jim Canyon in the Santa Ana Mountains. . . . Ironically, the grizzly still graces the state flag, even though the California species is extinct. "California is the only state whose emblem is a stuffed museum piece," says local historian Jim Sleeper.
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