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Jim Steyer

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BUSINESS
May 11, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
As far as Jim Steyer's children are concerned, he has the worst job ever. Their friends complain that because of what he does at the office, they're forbidden to visit some websites or watch certain TV shows. The grousing doesn't bother Steyer, the founder and chief executive of Common Sense Media ( www.commonsensemedia.org), because it's proof of his success.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 2010 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Video games are replete with gangsters, zombies and other evil characters. But for the industry that makes those games, its scariest foe is Jim Steyer. A longtime children's advocate, Steyer has taken up the flag against the game industry and lobbied zealously on behalf of a California law that bans the sale of violent games to minors. The law, which was struck down by lower federal courts as unconstitutional, is scheduled for a hearing Tuesday in the U.S. Supreme Court. For Steyer, the hearing is the culmination of a life's work tackling what he sees as a major health hazard endangering kids.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 2010 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Video games are replete with gangsters, zombies and other evil characters. But for the industry that makes those games, its scariest foe is Jim Steyer. A longtime children's advocate, Steyer has taken up the flag against the game industry and lobbied zealously on behalf of a California law that bans the sale of violent games to minors. The law, which was struck down by lower federal courts as unconstitutional, is scheduled for a hearing Tuesday in the U.S. Supreme Court. For Steyer, the hearing is the culmination of a life's work tackling what he sees as a major health hazard endangering kids.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
As far as Jim Steyer's children are concerned, he has the worst job ever. Their friends complain that because of what he does at the office, they're forbidden to visit some websites or watch certain TV shows. The grousing doesn't bother Steyer, the founder and chief executive of Common Sense Media ( www.commonsensemedia.org), because it's proof of his success.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday called on the news media to use more positive images of people, saying that children cannot protect themselves from increasing sensationalism and violence on the news. "Children can't cope with much of what they see" on television, she said. A steady diet of stories about children being murdered or priests who molest children tends to desensitize young viewers and "prevent them from developing emotionally and psychologically," she said.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2008 | Swati Pandey, Times Staff Writer
The bloodthirsty fisherman isn't the only one who can claim, "I Still Know What You Did Last Summer." Nearly 9 million children also know the gory details of the R-rated 1998 horror sequel about teens fleeing a stalker. In a study published in the August issue of Pediatrics, Dartmouth Medical School researchers found that violent movies like "Last Summer" attract, on average, 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While crime inundates KNBC-TV Channel 4's local news hours, the station in all its wisdom programs useful shows like "Growing Up Scared" and "Victory Over Violence" at the wonderfully convenient hours of noon and 7 p.m. on a Saturday. In "Growing Up Scared," about ways for parents to help their kids contend with violence, host Teri Garr forever reminisces about her innocent childhood, but hers is a selective memory: The '60s were hardly a placid, safe time for a lot of kids.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Parents take note: Your teens can now post status updates and photos on Facebook for anyone to see. The giant social network on Wednesday lifted restrictions on kids ages 13 to 17 that kept them from sharing information with people they do not know. Until now, teens' posts on Facebook could be viewed only by friends and the friends of their friends. The move presents a tough new challenge to parents trying to keep their kids safe on social media. Facebook said it was bringing its privacy policy in line with competitors' by giving teens the freedom to decide whether they want to express themselves among a close circle of friends or with a bullhorn.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2010 | David G. Savage and Alex Pham, reporting from washington reporting from los angeles
One version of the video game "Postal 2" features an easily angered "postal guy" with dark glasses and a high-powered rifle. He wanders through town killing everyone he sees, leaving them bloody and mutilated. A trip to the library turns into carnage of mass shootings and blazing fires. Another features young girls being struck by a shovel as they beg for mercy. The player can then pour gasoline over them, set them on fire and urinate on them. Despite admittedly being disturbed by what he saw in "Postal 2," a federal judge struck down, on free-speech grounds, a California law that would forbid the sale or rental of such grossly violent video games to those younger than 18. On Tuesday, when much of the nation is focused on the midterm elections to Congress, the Supreme Court will hear California's appeal and debate whether the states can restrict the sale of violent games to children and teenagers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2003 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Quentin Tarantino's bloody homage to martial arts, "Kill Bill Vol. 1," slashed its way to an estimated $22.2 million over the weekend, Miramax reported. Clint Eastwood's widely acclaimed drama "Mystic River" grossed a stunning $45,491 per theater in 13 locations for a three-day estimated total of $591,390. It marked a per-theater average record for Eastwood, who has received rave reviews for his interpretation of the somber drama based on Dennis Lehane's bestselling novel.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2003 | Ronald Brownstein
Why are Brad Pitt and Julia Roberts stonewalling thousands of middle and high school students writing to ask them to stop glamorizing smoking in their films? Probably because that's how the entertainment industry almost always reacts when challenged on the social effect of its products, especially on children.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
No ads for our tweens on Facebook. That's the gist of a letter written to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg from a coalition of consumer, privacy and child-advocacy groups. "Facebook is a kind of privacy minefield," said Jeff Chester of the Center for Digital Democracy. "Now that they're public, kids are the last area in the United States where there is a market potential. " As the company considers letting kids younger than 13 years old in the front door instead of their sneaking in through cracks in the system, a dialogue has begun about what is -- and is not -- appropriate for young people in the online social sphere.
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