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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As concertmaster for the orchestra that recorded the soundtrack for the movie "Psycho," classical violinist Israel Baker helped create a piece of pop culture that is regarded as one of Hollywood's most terrifying. He led the piercing attack of the violins that accompanies the 1960 Alfred Hitchcock film's chilling shower scene. He "was a renowned violinist and concertmaster in the Hollywood studio system" and was heard on dozens of movie scores, said Jon Burlingame, a film and music historian.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1992
I am moved to write a letter of complaint about Grice (or should I say Mrs. Wallace A. Smith, the station president's wife?). I've been meaning to write for some time about her cutesy-wootsy talk, not to mention her ghastly corny "witticisms." Someone already complained to her about that, so she told us, but then she responded with a thumbing-of-her-nose "joke." Oh, to have Gail Eichenthal back! Since that's unlikely, how about the former programming director, the bringer of this embarrassing lawsuit, Tom Deacon?
MAGAZINE
November 28, 1999 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott last wrote for the magazine about three men joining the priesthood
The best classical music DJ in America doesn't own a home stereo, would rather play Spike Jones than Herbert von Karajan and has sworn to kill anyone who tries to steal his Spice Girls poster. Jim Svejda is decidedly not your father's classical radio guy. He's so passionately devoted to Mozart that he once wrote the composer's name on a summer job application in the box marked "religion," yet he refers to the Luciano Pavarotti of the late 1990s as "a vulgar sot."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1992
I read with much sadness the letters about the lawsuit of Tom Deacon regarding Bonnie Grice, Wallace A. Smith and KUSC Radio ("Is Love a Threat to Classical-Music Lovers?," Nov. 28). What I find puzzling is how unfair a limited number of listeners of KUSC-FM are to the style and format of Grice's morning-commute show. Grice has chosen a format that showcases classical music for the average commuter battling traffic. I believe this more accessible approach will ultimately increase the audience for shows such as Jim Svejda's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As concertmaster for the orchestra that recorded the soundtrack for the movie "Psycho," classical violinist Israel Baker helped create a piece of pop culture that is regarded as one of Hollywood's most terrifying. He led the piercing attack of the violins that accompanies the 1960 Alfred Hitchcock film's chilling shower scene. He "was a renowned violinist and concertmaster in the Hollywood studio system" and was heard on dozens of movie scores, said Jon Burlingame, a film and music historian.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1996
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the biggest problem with KUSC's recent format: There was no substance (Letters, Dec. 15). Whenever I listened, all I heard were bonbons, regardless of the type of music, except during Jim Svejda's program. I quickly got an icky taste in my ear, which was even harder to accept because the music tended to be presented as if to kindergartners (again, Svejda was an exception). The older KUSC was a bit staid, but it did offer substance as well as sweets.
MAGAZINE
November 28, 1999 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott last wrote for the magazine about three men joining the priesthood
The best classical music DJ in America doesn't own a home stereo, would rather play Spike Jones than Herbert von Karajan and has sworn to kill anyone who tries to steal his Spice Girls poster. Jim Svejda is decidedly not your father's classical radio guy. He's so passionately devoted to Mozart that he once wrote the composer's name on a summer job application in the box marked "religion," yet he refers to the Luciano Pavarotti of the late 1990s as "a vulgar sot."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Classical music station KUSC-FM (91.5) will celebrate its 60th birthday Tuesday with special guests and programming throughout the day. Among the features will be a replay of a concert broadcast from USC's Hancock Auditorium in the 1940s and excerpts from Jim Svejda's "Opera Quiz" shows.
MAGAZINE
January 9, 2000
Several years ago, I turned my radio to KUSC during its "new sound of classical music" era and heard a hideous version of Bizet's "Carmen Suite" played by flutist James Galway. When it was over, a familiar voice came on and said: "And now for something different. Some real music." For moments like that, thank you, Jim Svejda. Thank you. Alan Coles Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1996
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the biggest problem with KUSC's recent format: There was no substance (Letters, Dec. 15). Whenever I listened, all I heard were bonbons, regardless of the type of music, except during Jim Svejda's program. I quickly got an icky taste in my ear, which was even harder to accept because the music tended to be presented as if to kindergartners (again, Svejda was an exception). The older KUSC was a bit staid, but it did offer substance as well as sweets.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1992
I read with much sadness the letters about the lawsuit of Tom Deacon regarding Bonnie Grice, Wallace A. Smith and KUSC Radio ("Is Love a Threat to Classical-Music Lovers?," Nov. 28). What I find puzzling is how unfair a limited number of listeners of KUSC-FM are to the style and format of Grice's morning-commute show. Grice has chosen a format that showcases classical music for the average commuter battling traffic. I believe this more accessible approach will ultimately increase the audience for shows such as Jim Svejda's.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1992
The Deacon-KUSC article is one more reminder of how badly this once-fine station has deteriorated. In becoming personality-oriented in an effort to avoid being "stuffy," Smith and his colleagues have forgotten that people who love good music listen to a classical-music station for the music. Good music has spoken for itself over the centuries and needs no help from people in love with the sounds of their own voices. Pithy, cogent comment, delivered with wit and intelligence--such as we get from Jim Svejda--is always welcome, but dissertations on cooking rutabagas or a description of a drive down Sunset Boulevard are an exasperating distraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1992
"M ore Talk, Less Bach," last Sunday's story on KUSC-FM by Patrick Mott, has prompted an outpouring from readers . Those critical of the station's revamped format outnumbered supporters by more than 2 to 1. A sampling of their views: For classical music lovers, what has happened to KUSC is a calamity. By emphasizing the blather of announcers Bonnie Grice and Tom Crann, and playing far too much dreck, station president Wally Smith has made a double-edged error. First, he put the spotlight on announcers who, with their inanely casual style, demean the classical repertory.
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