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Jim Thorpe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2006
March 28, 1953: Native American athlete Jim Thorpe, who won two gold medals in the 1912 Olympics and went on to play professional baseball and football, died at 64 in his Lomita trailer. After Thorpe won the decathlon and pentathlon at the Olympics in Stockholm, Swedish King Gustav V said, "Sir, you are the greatest athlete in the world."
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NATIONAL
October 26, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
In an odd series of events leaving authorities searching for answers, a Pennsylvania police officer took another officer hostage, drove him to a nearby town in a police car, and ultimately shot himself in the head. Carbon County Deputy Sheriff David Midas, 33, died after a self-inflicted gunshot wound at 8:20 p.m. Friday, according to state police. Midas went to the Lansford police station Friday night and took ammunition and an unmarked police car and drove it to the home of another off-duty officer and took him hostage, according to the Associated Press.
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NEWS
December 9, 1986 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--The competition was won long ago, but there was one final medal ceremony for Jim Thorpe. The five surviving children of the American Indian who was considered one of the world's greatest athletes presented their father's Olympic gold medals to the Oklahoma Historical Society. "Today--after all these years--today these medals finally come home to rest," said the athlete's son, Jack Thorpe, chief of the Sac and Fox Indians, at the Oklahoma City ceremony.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2013 | By Peter Hall
It was a sweat lodge ceremony in Texas where Jim Thorpe reached out to his grandson through a medicine man. The shaman told John Thorpe that his grandfather's spirit was content in the Pennsylvania town where his body has lain for six decades. "Grandpa made contact with him and told him that he was at peace and wanted no more upset connected to him," John Thorpe said. That was nearly three years ago - shortly after one of Jim Thorpe's sons, Jack, filed a lawsuit against the eastern Pennsylvania borough named after the legendary Native American athlete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
The school board unanimously chose legendary athlete Jim Thorpe over suffragette Susan B. Anthony when naming a planned new elementary school this week. Trustees also unanimously voted to name a second new school after Pio Pico, the last Mexican governor of California, instead of after former Mexican President Benito Juarez. "Pio Pico is a very important figure in California history," said Trustee Robert W. Balen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The dusty field on West Alton Avenue was barren and blazing hot. But the image of sports great Jim Thorpe stood triumphant over the 175 schoolchildren, educators and fans who gathered Wednesday to break ground for what is believed to be the first school in California named after the Native American who won two gold medals in the 1912 Olympic Games.
SPORTS
October 28, 1985 | From Times Wire Services and
Jim Thorpe took advantage of a bogey by Jack Renner on the par-4 13th hole Sunday and went on to win the Tucson Match Play Championship title with a 4 and 3 victory on the Randolph North Golf Course at Tucson. Thorpe, 36, who scored the first victory of his PGA Tour career in the Milwaukee Open earlier this season, claimed $150,000 from the total purse of $750,000.
SPORTS
September 9, 1988 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
As a safety tandem, USC's Mark Carrier and Cleveland Colter work together as teammates. In a sense, though, they are competing against one another. Both have been nominated for the Jim Thorpe Award, given to the nation's best collegiate defensive back. Their skills are so comparable that you can't mention one without referring to the other. They are usually interviewed as an entry, as they were recently.
SPORTS
February 16, 2001 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jim Thorpe's Olympic gold medals were returned to his family in 1983, 70 years after they had been taken from their father, his children wept with joy. And a happy sports nation wept with them. Now Jim Thorpe's children want something else returned: Jim Thorpe. Five of Thorpe's children announced at an Oklahoma City news conference Thursday that they want their father's remains returned from Jim Thorpe, Pa., and buried in a family cemetery at Shawnee, Okla.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2012
The decathletes Here are three more Olympic champions who tried their luck at the movies: Jim Thorpe Thorpe won Olympic gold medals in 1912 for the pentathlon and decathlon. He was stripped of them when it was learned he had played semi-professional baseball before the Olympics, but they were reinstated in 1983. He appeared in mostly uncredited roles in films and shorts, including 1935's "Captain Blood" and 1950's "Wagon Master. " Bob Mathias The two-time Olympic gold medal winner in the decathlon, Mathias played himself in 1954's "The Bob Mathias Story" and continued to work in movies and TV, including starring with Keenan Wynn in the 1959-60 series "The Troubleshooters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2012
The decathletes Here are three more Olympic champions who tried their luck at the movies: Jim Thorpe Thorpe won Olympic gold medals in 1912 for the pentathlon and decathlon. He was stripped of them when it was learned he had played semi-professional baseball before the Olympics, but they were reinstated in 1983. He appeared in mostly uncredited roles in films and shorts, including 1935's "Captain Blood" and 1950's "Wagon Master. " Bob Mathias The two-time Olympic gold medal winner in the decathlon, Mathias played himself in 1954's "The Bob Mathias Story" and continued to work in movies and TV, including starring with Keenan Wynn in the 1959-60 series "The Troubleshooters.
SPORTS
June 10, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
The Olympic Games offer competitors the chance to bathe in national glory and international acclaim. The victors - indeed, all the athletes who aspire to victory - are celebrated in the Olympic motto of "Citius, Altius, Fortius. " Faster, higher, stronger. Yet celebration and aspiration sometimes share the Olympic spotlight with controversy, with scandal and with athletes who train and compete outside the bounds of Citius, Altius and Fortius. One ranking of the 10 least pure moments in the history of the Summer Games: No. 10 (1912)
SPORTS
April 25, 2012 | By Brian Cronin
FOOTBALL URBAN LEGEND : The first pro football halftime show was designed as a way to sell dogs. Today, halftime shows are a consistent part of any NFL game, with the Super Bowl halftime show routinely being the most lavish example. However, in the early days of pro football, halftime shows were non-existent. The players would go into the locker rooms and that was it. Even in college football, halftime shows by the 1920s were a rarity. This changed with the introduction of a new football team in 1922 that was designed all around one very important function...selling dogs.
SPORTS
February 12, 2009 | Barry Stavro
The deification of sports figures continues, this time in Pittsburgh. A regional commission approved plans to name a street near Heinz Field after former Steelers coach Chuck Noll, who led the team to four Super Bowl titles. Nearby, streets are already named in honor of Hall of Famer and Pirates star Bill Mazeroski, the late Steelers owner Art Rooney Sr. and former Pitt football star Tony Dorsett. In Boston, there's the Ted Williams Tunnel; in Green Bay, a Vince Lombardi middle school; and in Austin, Texas, a subdivision called Ty Cobb Place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2006
July 30, 1938: An overflow crowd of 30,000 came out to see the leading men take on the comedians in the annual motion picture charity baseball game at Wrigley Field in South Los Angeles. Mary Pickford threw out the first ball, caught by "the great Indian athlete of yesteryear," Jim Thorpe, The Times reported. Dick Powell was captain of the leading men. Buster Keaton was "cavorting around the infield" for the comedians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2006
March 28, 1953: Native American athlete Jim Thorpe, who won two gold medals in the 1912 Olympics and went on to play professional baseball and football, died at 64 in his Lomita trailer. After Thorpe won the decathlon and pentathlon at the Olympics in Stockholm, Swedish King Gustav V said, "Sir, you are the greatest athlete in the world."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2000 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last bolts, wires and cables are finally in place and although the school in Santa Ana named for Jim Thorpe is winding up its first year of classes, the school officially opens today with songs, speeches and a dedication to the athlete whom it honors. Named for the Native American athlete who won two gold medals in the 1912 Olympic Games, the school, which was completed this year and houses 740 students, is a fundamental school, placing strong emphasis on the basics.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2013 | By Peter Hall
It was a sweat lodge ceremony in Texas where Jim Thorpe reached out to his grandson through a medicine man. The shaman told John Thorpe that his grandfather's spirit was content in the Pennsylvania town where his body has lain for six decades. "Grandpa made contact with him and told him that he was at peace and wanted no more upset connected to him," John Thorpe said. That was nearly three years ago - shortly after one of Jim Thorpe's sons, Jack, filed a lawsuit against the eastern Pennsylvania borough named after the legendary Native American athlete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gail Margaret Thorpe, a daughter of famed athlete Jim Thorpe, died Friday in Oklahoma after a lengthy illness, the Jim Thorpe Assn. said in a statement. She was 88.
SPORTS
July 22, 2002 | Shav Glick
Jim Thorpe is a senior golfer who wins sometimes, but smiles nearly all the time. Hale Irwin is a senior golfer who wins most of the time, but almost never smiles. "Hale's a great player who has won more money than anyone who has played the game, but he's one of those guys who is just not fan friendly," Thorpe said. "We have a bunch of jerks out there." Thorpe said his fellow seniors have a ritual with Irwin, the tour's leading money winner with $1.5 million this year.
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