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Jim Thorpe Pa

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SPORTS
July 11, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took 71 years of asking, but in 1983 the family of Jim Thorpe was finally given back the two Olympic gold medals Thorpe won at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics. Thorpe, as a Carlisle, Pa., Indian School athlete, played semipro baseball during the summer of 1911, the year before he won his gold medals for the decathlon and pentathlon in Sweden. Seven months after the 1912 Olympics, a newspaper in Worcester, Mass., reported that Thorpe had earned $2 per game playing baseball.
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SPORTS
July 11, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took 71 years of asking, but in 1983 the family of Jim Thorpe was finally given back the two Olympic gold medals Thorpe won at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics. Thorpe, as a Carlisle, Pa., Indian School athlete, played semipro baseball during the summer of 1911, the year before he won his gold medals for the decathlon and pentathlon in Sweden. Seven months after the 1912 Olympics, a newspaper in Worcester, Mass., reported that Thorpe had earned $2 per game playing baseball.
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SPORTS
February 16, 2001 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jim Thorpe's Olympic gold medals were returned to his family in 1983, 70 years after they had been taken from their father, his children wept with joy. And a happy sports nation wept with them. Now Jim Thorpe's children want something else returned: Jim Thorpe. Five of Thorpe's children announced at an Oklahoma City news conference Thursday that they want their father's remains returned from Jim Thorpe, Pa., and buried in a family cemetery at Shawnee, Okla.
SPORTS
March 28, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1950, the Associated Press conducted a poll of sportswriters and sports broadcasters, trying to determine who was the greatest athlete of the first half-century. The runaway winner: Jim Thorpe. He died at 64 on this date 46 years ago, stricken by a heart attack while having dinner in his small trailer on Pacific Coast Highway in Lomita. The range of his athletic achievements remain unmatched, even by modern standards of two-sport athletes such as Bo Jackson and Deion Sanders.
TRAVEL
February 17, 1991 | ERIC FRIEDHEIM
Question: Are there short cruises in Alaskan and other northern waterways? Answer: Short cruises are offered in various parts of Alaska and on the Yukon. Contact See Alaska Sightseeing Tours at (800) 426-7702, or Gray Line of Alaska at (800) 544-2206. Q: Where can I get information about fishing in the Florida area? A: Free information is offered by the Fish Florida Referral Service. Call (800) 741-5873 for information.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Benjamin S. Bloom, whose research transformed teaching around the world and provided a theoretical basis for the Head Start program in this country, has died. He was 86. The eminent researcher, a professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, died Monday at his Chicago home, university spokesman Bill Harms said.
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | ROSA SALTER, THE ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL
As the hike begins, the pre-dawn air is cool and moist with drizzle. The terrain, through state game lands, is flat until it drops sharply down a ridge to Schuylkill River near the town of Port Clinton, blanketed in morning fog. Across the river, the climb steepens until the crest of the mountain ridge is reached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2007
The Defense Department last week identified the following American military personnel killed in Afghanistan and Iraq: Jeffrey A. Avery, 19, of Colorado Springs, Colo.; private first class, Army. Avery was killed Monday when an improvised bomb exploded at a security checkpoint in Muqdadiya, Iraq, northeast of Baghdad. He was assigned to the 571st Military Police Company, 504th Military Police Battalion, 42nd Military Police Brigade at Ft. Lewis, Wash. * Ray M.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By Kari Howard
So this week they announced the latest crop of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame nominees. And of course one of my favorites, Nirvana, is a lock. But our pop critic Randall Roberts gives these grim odds for a band I like even more, the Replacements: 25 to 1. Justice must be served to one of the best songwriters of the last 30 years, Paul Westerberg. Start lobbying the voting members now. It would be cool to create our own Hall of Fame here at The Times, with the writers behind the most legendary Column Ones (the retro term for Great Reads)
TRAVEL
July 24, 1988 | ART WILD, Wild is a Times news editor.
The brochure carried a promise and a warning. "It is an opportunity to walk through history," it said. "It is not, however, for those faint of heart." After an 8,000-mile tour of the Soviet Union with 22 stouthearted fellow travelers, my wife and I were in total agreement. It was a rigorous but exhilarating and enlightening journey. We found it well worth the time and effort to extend our itinerary beyond Moscow and Leningrad to Siberia, Central Asia and Georgia.
WORLD
November 11, 2003 | Associated Press
The Department of Defense and family members have identified 383 U.S. troops who have died in Iraq since the war began March 20, through Nov. 7. Of these, 245 died on or after May 1, when President Bush declared that major combat operations had ended. Those listed here include noncombat deaths. Other U.S. troops have been reported dead but have not been fully identified. Starting Sunday, The Times will begin publishing a weekly accounting of U.S. troop deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan.
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