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Jim Tippins

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991 | ZION BANKS
Jim Tippins' secret blend of cornmeal on buffalo catfish is only part of what draws hundreds of people to his place each week. The other is that the Santa Ana restaurant is a rare place for blacks to meet in Orange County. Tippins Sea Food Connection is aptly named, customers say. A noted gathering spot for blacks scattered throughout the county, the restaurant provides more than fresh fish, fried Louisiana style.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991 | ZION BANKS
Jim Tippins' secret blend of cornmeal on buffalo catfish is only part of what draws hundreds of people to his place each week. The other is that the Santa Ana restaurant is a rare place for blacks to meet in Orange County. Tippins Sea Food Connection is aptly named, customers say. A noted gathering spot for blacks scattered throughout the county, the restaurant provides more than fresh fish, fried Louisiana style.
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NEWS
September 19, 1991 | ZION BANKS
For fried fish spiced Cajun style and a side dish of kitchen conversation--a combination rarely found in Orange County--Tippins Sea Food Connection in Santa Ana is the place to visit. Mild to fiery dishes are personally delivered with boisterous greetings by owner Jim Tippins. The no-frills atmosphere (paper plates and plastic utensils) and a relatively small staff contribute not only to affordable prices but to the intimacy of dining here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A professor emeritus who said he swatted an African American student on the bare behind with a ruler will not be teaching at Cal State Fullerton anytime soon, according to a university official who said Friday that "appropriate action" has been taken in the case.
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | ZION BANKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When black Texans began their migration to other states after the Civil War, California--with its ripe mining and agricultural markets--looked like a golden opportunity. Poor and often ragged, these newly freed slaves came only with their strong work ethics and an equally strong sense of freedom. On June 22 in Santa Ana, many of their descendants will celebrate the event that was responsible for them leaving the South in the first place: the end of slavery.
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