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Jim Tressel

SPORTS
August 2, 2011 | Chris Dufresne
Willie Lyles does not coach or play football or work for ESPN. He is not a candidate for this year's Heisman Trophy. No one invited him to grand-opening festivities. He just sort of crashed the party. Only in wacky college football world could Oregon and Louisiana State meet in a huge Sept. 3 game in Dallas with both teams under NCAA investigation for dealings with same guy. Some are already calling it "The Lyles Bowl. " Lyles is a Houston-based scouting services provider who may have provided players instead of services.
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SPORTS
July 15, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Noting that "progress has been made," NFL owners and players wrapped up a round of intensive talks Friday without a full agreement to end the league's four-month lockout but determined to keep pushing over the weekend. NFL Players Assn. leader DeMaurice Smith expects to speak with Commissioner Roger Goodell in the next couple of days, possibly in person, while the sides' legal and financial teams continue working. After about eight hours of negotiations in New York on Friday — tacked onto more than 25 hours across Wednesday and Thursday — the league and players issued a joint statement that said: "The discussions this week have been constructive and progress has been made on a wide range of issues.
SPORTS
July 8, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Ohio State's 2010 Big Ten Conference championship, its 12-1 season, its victories against rival Michigan and in the Sugar Bowl — all gone. Coach Jim Tressel is out and so is star quarterback Terrelle Pryor . Left behind: two years of self-imposed probation. The question now is whether it will be enough to save Ohio State football from more severe penalties in an upcoming trip to see the NCAA committee on infractions. In response to NCAA violations committed by football players who traded autographs and memorabilia for cash and tattoos — and by a coach who covered it up — Ohio State issued its official response Friday.
SPORTS
June 7, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Terrelle Pryor's career at Ohio State, which started with so much promise and potential, came to an abrupt and scandal-ridden end. The Ohio State quarterback announced through his attorney Tuesday that he would not play for the Buckeyes this season. He had already been suspended for the first five games for breaking NCAA rules by accepting improper benefits from the owner of a tattoo parlor. He is expected to make himself available for an NFL supplemental draft. The NCAA is looking into all aspects of Ohio State's once-glittering program, including cash, tattoos and car deals for players and other potential violations.
SPORTS
May 31, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
A day after coach Jim Tressel's forced resignation for lying about Ohio State players receiving improper benefits, the focus has shifted to the investigation of star quarterback Terrelle Pryor and his succession of used cars. The salesman who put Pryor behind the wheel of several vehicles said in an affidavit released by Ohio State on Tuesday that he didn't offer any special deals to Buckeyes. "The deals that I did for Ohio State student-athletes were no different than any of the other 10,000-plus deals that I've done for all my other customers," Aaron Kniffin said in the statement.
SPORTS
May 30, 2011 | Chris Dufresne
Jim Tressel's resignation as Ohio State football coach on Memorial Day was sad for all the kids involved but sadder for all the grown-ups. The school is now in search of a permanent coach and an instructor for a new course called "Crisis Bungling. " It could be taught next year by Gene Smith, if he's still the athletic director, and Gordon Gee, if he's still the president. Tressel, Gee, Smith — the Three Buckeyeteers — are all in this together. You expect young people to mess up. It's what they do. They make mistakes, and often compound them.
SPORTS
April 28, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Big Ten Conference Commissioner Jim Delany might have acted differently toward five Ohio State football players who were allowed to play in the Sugar Bowl despite NCAA violations had he known the information that has since been uncovered. The players were permitted to wait until this fall to begin serving five-game suspensions for accepting money and tattoos from the owner of a Columbus tattoo parlor. It was not until more than a week after the Buckeyes' 31-26 victory over Arkansas that school officials realized Coach Jim Tressel had known about the violations for more than nine months.
SPORTS
March 12, 2011 | Melissa Rohlin, Staff and Wire Reports
The Columbus, Ohio, lawyer who tipped off Ohio State Coach Jim Tressel that two of his players were involved in a federal drug trafficking case has received death threats and now says he regrets ever contacting the Buckeyes coach. "I'm not the Judas in this situation. You know, I feel like Peter, but I'm not the Judas," attorney Christopher Cicero said in an interview Friday with ESPN's "Outside the Lines" and reported on ESPN.com. Tressel has admitted he violated NCAA rules by not disclosing information Cicero e-mailed to him. He repeatedly refrained from telling Ohio State's compliance department or his superiors about potential NCAA bylaw violations involving some of his players.
SPORTS
March 11, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
In the wake of the Jim Tressel scandal at Ohio State, it is hard to know which target to fire at. We must choose between the smarmy world of big-time college football or the smarmy Tressel. Either way, it's fun to use a great word like "smarmy. " Out here among the palm trees and the skateboards at Venice Beach, we probably don't care all that much. The sun is out and we've already had our own recent fill of cheating players (Reggie Bush) and head-in-the-sand-until-I-depart coaches (Pete Carroll)
SPORTS
January 26, 2011 | By Peter A. Coclanis and Alex Coclanis, Special to The Times
Admittedly, the 2010-2011 bowl season wasn't kind to the Big Ten, whose teams finished with a mediocre 3-5 record. The fact that Big Ten teams were underdogs in six of the eight games in which they participated hasn't been mentioned much in the national media, which as usual have pounded on the venerable conference, calling it overrated, if not second-rate. The Big Ten hasn't helped itself much in this regard either: The proposed names for the league's new divisions -- Legends and Leaders -- were tailor-made for parody, and readily morphed on the internet into Losers and Laggards, to the amusement of the league's many detractors.
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