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Jim Uhls

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Fight Club," a film about men who like to fight, is an unsettling experience, but not the way anyone intended. What's most troubling about this witless mishmash of whiny, infantile philosophizing and bone-crunching violence is the increasing realization that it actually thinks it's saying something of significance. That is a scary notion indeed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
The science-fiction thriller "Jumper" is being marketed as a cross between the "Bourne" movies and "The Matrix." And sure, there's plenty of globe-trotting and an obscure mythology in place, and "Jumper" star Hayden Christensen does share a conveniently blank, otherworldly quality with fellow Canadian Keanu Reeves -- a trait that's balanced by the gravitas of a powerful African American actor (Samuel L. Jackson). But "Jumper" is all high concept with little invested in characters or story.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
There is a lot of good work in "Liars Poker" at the Cast Theatre--nice acting, decent if unspectacular direction, even some individually well-written moments. But this Bernard Velinsky play that was workshopped in the Cast's Foundry series, is one more barroom slice of life that adds up to . . . not very much.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
The one sure thing that David Fincher's $68-million movie "Fight Club" has going for it, or against it, is controversy. According to movie marketing experts, the free publicity that the film is generating can either help or impair a film's ultimate box-office performance. No one in Hollywood doubts that 20th Century Fox's "Fight Club," starring Brad Pitt and Edward Norton, will have a strong opening this weekend--estimates range from $14 million to $17 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oscar-nominated actor Edward Norton doesn't take criticism lightly. At least not criticism of "Fight Club," the violent, brutal 1999 satire he stars in with Brad Pitt and Helena Bonham Carter. "Fight Club," which recently came out on a two-disc special DVD edition (Fox, $35), didn't exactly burn up the box office or win over the hearts of many critics. In commentary on the disc, Norton is quick to chastise The Times' movie critic, Kenneth Turan, for not finding a certain scene funny.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2007 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
It's not often that a 90-minute staged performance includes a Renaissance-era swordfight to the death, a present-day shouting match between a devout suburban mother and her stoner son, and the sexual assault of a 17-year-old female Bosnian sniper. But at Safehouse that's just another Monday night. A weekly workshop for writers to see their work performed by local actors, Safehouse is the creation of screenwriters Aleks Horvat ("Sweethearts") and Jim Uhls ("Fight Club").
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1999 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waking up in bed, fully clothed, after a night of drinking and dancing and who knows what else, Rick, a disheveled young lawyer in the new movie "Body Shots," raises a puzzled brow when the young lawyer next to him opens her eyes and asks, in a hung-over, whispery voice: "What the hell happened?" It's a straightforward question. But anyone who expects a straightforward answer hasn't been paying attention at the movies of late, because straightforward has gone out of style.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2006 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
Scriptland is a new weekly feature on the work and professional lives of screenwriters. * Indiana Jones, meet Jack Sparrow. Jim Uhls, who successfully adapted the "unadaptable" Chuck Palahniuk novel "Fight Club," has been hired to turn "Rex Mundi," a series of graphic novels by Arvid Nelson and Eric Johnson, into a feature for Johnny Depp to star in and produce through his Infinitum Nihil (Infinite Nothing) production company.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
Walk into the Office and you feel as though you've wandered into a Brentwood day spa. And in a sense you have, but a day spa for writers. Writers who live in Brentwood or the Palisades or Santa Monica, writers with studio deals, perhaps, and offices at home or on the lot but who nevertheless still find themselves needing that elusive "room of one's own," as Virginia Woolf, in a somewhat different context, put it.
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