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Jim Velasques

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1997 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jim Velasques, tribal chief of the Coastal Gabrieleno-Digueno Indians, picked up his mail at the front door Friday, he found a small padded Manila envelope containing a bullet. Painted white and with the threat, "Our ancestors await you" inscribed on it, the bullet became the latest in a rash of threats sent to people linked by their involvement with development projects. "The minute I saw that the envelope was padded, that was it. I knew what it was," Velasques said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1997 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jim Velasques, tribal chief of the Coastal Gabrieleno-Digueno Indians, picked up his mail at the front door Friday, he found a small padded Manila envelope containing a bullet. Painted white and with the threat, "Our ancestors await you" inscribed on it, the bullet became the latest in a rash of threats sent to people linked by their involvement with development projects. "The minute I saw that the envelope was padded, that was it. I knew what it was," Velasques said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sheriff's Department has launched an investigation after City Manager George Scarborough received a Manila envelope in the mail containing a bullet and a threatening note. More than a half dozen rifle bullets have been mailed to Orange County city officials and real-estate developers involved in projects being built on lands containing Native American bones or artifacts. The Sheriff's Department would not say if they think the latest incident is related. San Juan Capistrano Mayor David M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1994 | ROBERT BARKER
Native American tribal leaders said Thursday that they won't make recommendations for the disposition of what they believe to be remains of ancestors buried in the Bolsa Chica Wetlands until an investigation into an alleged death threat to an archeologist is completed. Tribal leaders said this week that they are not involved in the recent threat reported by archeologist Nancy Whitney-Desautels, who unearthed what some believe to be ancient Native American bones in the area.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spiritual rites and modern development clashed Wednesday as the Irvine Co. reburied ancient artifacts unearthed in 1994 while building a Newport Beach housing development. When the Irvine Co. began building the 149 Harbor Cove homes along the bluffs of upper Newport Bay, it discovered skeletal remains and artifacts, including charm stones, hunting tools and ceremony beads belonging to two tribes--the Juanenos band of Mission Indians and the Coastal Gabrieleno-Dieguno Indians.
NEWS
March 3, 1997 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY
Native American tribes seeking formal recognition from the U.S. government are required to meet seven criteria, according to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, which makes the ultimate decision: * History. They must be identified as an Indian entity by people outside their group and provide supporting documentation, such as photographs and newspaper clips, as well as federal, state and local records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | JAMES M. GOMEZ
Irvine Co. officials assured a group of local Indians on Friday that they will have a new role in monitoring future archeological digs at the Newport Coast development between Laguna Beach and Corona del Mar. But company officials refused a request to change their policy of digging up ancestral Indian remains and burying them in areas that are earmarked for open space. "We are doing everything according to state law," said project director Bernard A. Maniscalco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A crowd of about 200 people crammed into a meeting room Thursday night for an archeologist's public unveiling of data from one of Orange County's most important prehistoric finds. The crowd at the Western Digital Building gasped as Michael E. Macko held up a mahogany obsidian blade, uncovered along with more than 2,000 bone beads and dozens of round stone balls during a controversial excavation above Newport Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1997 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Warriors have quietly returned to school in Irvine. So have the Indians in Fullerton, the Comanches in Anaheim and the Aztecs in Westminster. In contrast to the controversy in Los Angeles public schools over mascots that depict Native Americans, Orange County schools say they have heard little or no protest. Still, some have considered the arguments and opted to keep the names. "We take a lot of pride in the Aztec name," said James Monahan, principal of La Quinta High School in Westminster.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bullets began arriving before Christmas. One was sent to an Irvine Co. vice president, another to Seal Beach's development director, and another to an American Indian leader. But not until Seal Beach Mayor Gwen Forsythe announced her intention to resign after being sent a rifle bullet earlier this month was it made public that an array of people have been sent bullets in the mail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spiritual rites and modern development clashed when members of a Native American tribe condemned the way the Irvine Co. on Wednesday reburied ancient artifacts unearthed in 1994 during the building of a Newport Beach housing development. When the Irvine Co.
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