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Jim Wallis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2005 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
On a recent rainy night, an evangelical Christian preacher held 900 people spellbound at a Pasadena church. He roared about evil and sexual morality. He quoted Jesus and the Hebrew prophets. He shared his story of conversion, recalling the fire-and-brimstone minister who first drew him to Christ. But the Rev. Jim Wallis, 56, saved most of his thunder for matters not typically found in evangelical Christian sermons: poverty, environmental protection and peacemaking.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2005 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
On a recent rainy night, an evangelical Christian preacher held 900 people spellbound at a Pasadena church. He roared about evil and sexual morality. He quoted Jesus and the Hebrew prophets. He shared his story of conversion, recalling the fire-and-brimstone minister who first drew him to Christ. But the Rev. Jim Wallis, 56, saved most of his thunder for matters not typically found in evangelical Christian sermons: poverty, environmental protection and peacemaking.
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MAGAZINE
November 6, 1994 | Howard Kohn, Contributing editor Howard Kohn is at work on a book titled "We Had a Dream," a look at the goals of the civil-rights movement 25 years later, to be published by Simon & Schuster.
Next to a sidewalk with weeds in every crack, a purple-blossoming plant was growing: a petunia, planted by someone as optimistic as the writer and political missionary Jim Wallis. On a hot September afternoon, Wallis was leading me through a stretch of Washington, D.C., known as the 14th Street corridor. The petunia stuck out among the forsaken patches of a neighborhood--Columbia Heights, 20 blocks from the White House--that has lain in waste since the 1968 rioting. Rounding a corner, we came upon five youths standing over another young man who was prone on the sidewalk, breathing loudly, his face messed up, skin broken, blood running onto his shirt.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Elizabeth Parker, the president of the Orange County Board of Education, the call to action came when a conservative Christian activist called her a "Nazi lover" for attending an abortion rights meeting. Father Brad Karelius of Santa Ana's Episcopal Church of the Messiah decided to get involved after noticing the increasing discomfort of his middle-of-the-road congregants with the Christian Coalition's fundamentalist views on social issues.
MAGAZINE
December 11, 1994
Your piece on Jim Wallis ("Faith, Hope and Activism," by Howard Kohn, Nov. 6) was uplifting. All my life I have lived in white suburban neighborhoods while my child attended predominantly white schools. Then I became starkly aware of the separateness of white America and black America. I recently moved to a predominantly African American neighborhood. My child now goes to a school where there is a mixture of races. Jim Wallis and the Sojourners light the way for those of us who have heard the wake-up call.
BOOKS
October 23, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH
THE SOUL OF POLITICS by Jim Wallis (The New Press/Orbis Books: $19.95; 275 pp.). The many-hued spiritual revival occurring in the U.S. today--fundamentalist, prophetic, evangelical, feminist, New Age, etc.--has many politicians quaking in their boots. They should be quaking: modern politicos are largely responsible for this rekindled interest in religion, having failed to produce an effective, encompassing vision for the nation and the world at large.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Elizabeth Parker, the president of the Orange County Board of Education, the call to action came when a conservative Christian activist called her a "Nazi lover" for attending an abortion rights meeting. Father Brad Karelius of Santa Ana's Episcopal Church of the Messiah decided to get involved after noticing the increasing discomfort of his middle-of-the-road congregants with the Christian Coalition's fundamentalist views on social issues.
OPINION
April 1, 2005
Re "Gospel for Both Sides of the Aisle," Column One, March 28: If we could only get a presidential candidate such as the Rev. Jim Wallis, we could finally create a third political party that would truly represent the best of both the Republican and Democratic parties and could unite the red and blue states. Carene Landino Temple City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996
George Mitrovich and Jim Wallis (Commentary, April 22) write about our uncivil political process without acknowledging historical process. History shows that radical campaign finance reform is necessary. For at least 30 years now, in my experience, capitalists have been purchasing political influence as if it were just another commodity. I took my first "practical politics" course in a small city in Iowa in the early 1960s under the sponsorship of the local Chamber of Commerce. It followed the enthusiasm of the city for a visit by General Electric's ambassador, Ronald Reagan.
MAGAZINE
December 11, 1994
There is always something in the Los Angeles Times Magazine that interests me, but the Nov. 6 issue was a particular joy, beginning with "Duet With a Diva," by James McCourt. No singer has given me as much pleasure as Victoria de los Angeles in the many recitals I attended here and in New York during the '60s and '70s. Then the article about Jim Wallis was fascinating. To read about a man who practices justice and tolerance was especially wonderful after the recent dismal political campaigns.
MAGAZINE
December 11, 1994
Your piece on Jim Wallis ("Faith, Hope and Activism," by Howard Kohn, Nov. 6) was uplifting. All my life I have lived in white suburban neighborhoods while my child attended predominantly white schools. Then I became starkly aware of the separateness of white America and black America. I recently moved to a predominantly African American neighborhood. My child now goes to a school where there is a mixture of races. Jim Wallis and the Sojourners light the way for those of us who have heard the wake-up call.
MAGAZINE
November 6, 1994 | Howard Kohn, Contributing editor Howard Kohn is at work on a book titled "We Had a Dream," a look at the goals of the civil-rights movement 25 years later, to be published by Simon & Schuster.
Next to a sidewalk with weeds in every crack, a purple-blossoming plant was growing: a petunia, planted by someone as optimistic as the writer and political missionary Jim Wallis. On a hot September afternoon, Wallis was leading me through a stretch of Washington, D.C., known as the 14th Street corridor. The petunia stuck out among the forsaken patches of a neighborhood--Columbia Heights, 20 blocks from the White House--that has lain in waste since the 1968 rioting. Rounding a corner, we came upon five youths standing over another young man who was prone on the sidewalk, breathing loudly, his face messed up, skin broken, blood running onto his shirt.
BOOKS
October 23, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH
THE SOUL OF POLITICS by Jim Wallis (The New Press/Orbis Books: $19.95; 275 pp.). The many-hued spiritual revival occurring in the U.S. today--fundamentalist, prophetic, evangelical, feminist, New Age, etc.--has many politicians quaking in their boots. They should be quaking: modern politicos are largely responsible for this rekindled interest in religion, having failed to produce an effective, encompassing vision for the nation and the world at large.
OPINION
March 17, 2007
Re "Evangelical agenda fight is heating up," March 10 I am always amused by such right-wing Christian leaders as James C. Dobson, who condemn such fellow tribesmen as the Rev. Jim Wallis for taking up causes such as global warming, the AIDS epidemic, poverty and ill-conceived wars. I take this to mean that evangelicals should mindlessly support big business, all wars and capital punishment and oppose universal healthcare and poverty programs. On the other hand, I can see why the likes of Dobson would counsel inaction in the face of global warming and its devastating consequences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1997
A group that presents itself as an alternative to the Christian Coalition is holding a conference today to "challenge the religious community of Orange County to do its part with regards to welfare reform." The conference, which is open to the public, will be held by the O.C. Call to Renewal from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the St. Joseph Center, at 480 S. Batavia St., in Orange.
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