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Jim White

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SPORTS
January 24, 1991 | CHUCK BOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The father sits in the stands, watching his son dribble upcourt. Frank White, 30 feet from the basket, calls Miraleste High's offensive set and notices how closely the Verbum Dei defender is guarding him. The junior guard dribbles the ball through his legs, goes around his defender and accelerates toward the hoop. Three more defenders block his path, but White stops and passes the ball to an open teammate for an easy basket.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
Disney World can be a nightmare for many visitors, but it's rarely a sexual hell. Yet in "Escape From Tomorrow," that's the experience of Jim White (Roy Abramsohn), a grouchy father of two who spends his last day in Mickey's playground stalking a pair of Parisian jailbait. They titter and "ooh la la" to his predatory delight. But Jim later awakens to find himself in bed with a bug-eyed, evil-stepmother type (Alison Lees-Taylor). Worse than the idea of sleeping with an age-appropriate woman - he compares his own thirtysomething wife (Elena Schuber)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Realism holds such a lofty place in today's pop music culture that it is used to justify anything--from gangsta rap's worst excesses of violence and misogyny to the banalities of modern-rockers who feel entitled to blurt out any artless declaration of pain and still call it art, as long as the pain is theirs, and therefore "real."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Roaring through the South in a beat-up 1970 Chevy Impala, alt-country singer-songwriter Jim White gives a guided tour to some of the off-the-interstate locales and milieus that inspire his music in the decidedly strange, delightfully demented documentary "Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus."
SPORTS
October 12, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jim White became the first driver to eclipse the 290-m.p.h. mark in a Funny Car, taking over the No. 1 qualifying position at the NHRA Chief Auto Parts Nationals at Ennis, Tex. White's elapsed time was 5.148 seconds at 290.13 m.p.h.
SPORTS
September 3, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jim White finished off a lucrative weekend by driving 283.64 m.p.h. in an elapsed time of 5.275 seconds, finishing the quarter mile as the escape hatch blew off his Dodge Daytona and nosing out John Force in the Funny Car final of the National Hot Rod Assn. at Indianapolis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1985
As a director of the Laguna Beach Free Clinic, I am writing to express my gratitude for your excellent coverage on the Laguna Beach Free Clinic and the current financial problems facing us (Sept. 26). It is my perception that many in the community think of the clinic in terms of those early years when it was viewed as a haven for drug abusers and street people. Nothing could be further from the truth, but the stigma still seems to persist. The many professionals (doctors, lawyers, psychologists, dentists and nurses)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2001 | RICHARD CROMELIN
*** 1/2 Johnny Dowd, "Temporary Shelter," KOCH. ** 1/2 Jim White, "No Such Place," Luaka Bop. The term roots-rock usually suggests a wholesome communion with the primary colors of American music, the red, white and blue of country, blues and gospel. But when you poke around those roots, you might also come across things better buried. For some artists, this kind of uncomfortable excavation is fuel for the creative fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
Disney World can be a nightmare for many visitors, but it's rarely a sexual hell. Yet in "Escape From Tomorrow," that's the experience of Jim White (Roy Abramsohn), a grouchy father of two who spends his last day in Mickey's playground stalking a pair of Parisian jailbait. They titter and "ooh la la" to his predatory delight. But Jim later awakens to find himself in bed with a bug-eyed, evil-stepmother type (Alison Lees-Taylor). Worse than the idea of sleeping with an age-appropriate woman - he compares his own thirtysomething wife (Elena Schuber)
SPORTS
April 5, 1991 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cliff Warren was officially named basketball coach at Harbor College and former Harbor Coach Jim White will serve as his assistant, Athletic Director Jim O'Brien said Thursday. "Jim and Cliff will be a dynamite duo," O'Brien said. "It will be an outstanding coaching staff." Warren, one of the South Bay's most successful prep coaches during his six seasons at Rolling Hills, replaces Ken Curry, who was fired after coaching Harbor for four seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2001 | RICHARD CROMELIN
*** 1/2 Johnny Dowd, "Temporary Shelter," KOCH. ** 1/2 Jim White, "No Such Place," Luaka Bop. The term roots-rock usually suggests a wholesome communion with the primary colors of American music, the red, white and blue of country, blues and gospel. But when you poke around those roots, you might also come across things better buried. For some artists, this kind of uncomfortable excavation is fuel for the creative fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Realism holds such a lofty place in today's pop music culture that it is used to justify anything--from gangsta rap's worst excesses of violence and misogyny to the banalities of modern-rockers who feel entitled to blurt out any artless declaration of pain and still call it art, as long as the pain is theirs, and therefore "real."
SPORTS
October 12, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jim White became the first driver to eclipse the 290-m.p.h. mark in a Funny Car, taking over the No. 1 qualifying position at the NHRA Chief Auto Parts Nationals at Ennis, Tex. White's elapsed time was 5.148 seconds at 290.13 m.p.h.
SPORTS
September 3, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jim White finished off a lucrative weekend by driving 283.64 m.p.h. in an elapsed time of 5.275 seconds, finishing the quarter mile as the escape hatch blew off his Dodge Daytona and nosing out John Force in the Funny Car final of the National Hot Rod Assn. at Indianapolis.
SPORTS
April 5, 1991 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cliff Warren was officially named basketball coach at Harbor College and former Harbor Coach Jim White will serve as his assistant, Athletic Director Jim O'Brien said Thursday. "Jim and Cliff will be a dynamite duo," O'Brien said. "It will be an outstanding coaching staff." Warren, one of the South Bay's most successful prep coaches during his six seasons at Rolling Hills, replaces Ken Curry, who was fired after coaching Harbor for four seasons.
SPORTS
January 24, 1991 | CHUCK BOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The father sits in the stands, watching his son dribble upcourt. Frank White, 30 feet from the basket, calls Miraleste High's offensive set and notices how closely the Verbum Dei defender is guarding him. The junior guard dribbles the ball through his legs, goes around his defender and accelerates toward the hoop. Three more defenders block his path, but White stops and passes the ball to an open teammate for an easy basket.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Roaring through the South in a beat-up 1970 Chevy Impala, alt-country singer-songwriter Jim White gives a guided tour to some of the off-the-interstate locales and milieus that inspire his music in the decidedly strange, delightfully demented documentary "Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus."
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Henry Rivero / Los Angeles Times. Graphics by Leavett Biles / Los Angeles Times
ORANGE COUNTY SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT (*55 unsolved murders in unincorporated areas) Dorothy Gale Brown, age 11, July 3, 1962 The girl's nude body was found in the ocean about 200 yards offshore, just south of Cameo Shores near Corona del Mar. The cause of death was listed as asphyxia due to drowning. The victim had last been seen alive July 3, riding her bicycle near her home in Torrance. She was found the next day by a diver, who brought her body ashore with the help of another diver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1985
As a director of the Laguna Beach Free Clinic, I am writing to express my gratitude for your excellent coverage on the Laguna Beach Free Clinic and the current financial problems facing us (Sept. 26). It is my perception that many in the community think of the clinic in terms of those early years when it was viewed as a haven for drug abusers and street people. Nothing could be further from the truth, but the stigma still seems to persist. The many professionals (doctors, lawyers, psychologists, dentists and nurses)
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