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Jim Whittaker

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BUSINESS
September 18, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first U.S. climber to conquer Mt. Everest now aspires to be the Fuller Brush man of environmentalism. Jim Whittaker, who climbed the Himalayan peak in 1963, has launched a direct-sales company to market environmentally benign household products. More than 800 part-time environmentalists/entrepreneurs in Oregon and Washington already preach preservation while they sell cleansers, soaps and toilet paper through Greenway, Whittaker's 2-year-old firm. His next target market: California.
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SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
This column is for the adventuresome, and buying tickets to a Lakers game and yelling at the referees does not qualify. Fifty years ago - May 1, 1963, to be exact - a tall and slender man named Jim Whittaker stood at the summit of Mt. Everest. That's 29,028 feet above sea level, or about as high as you are when you fly coast to coast in a commercial jet. Think of looking out the window and having somebody wave at you at eye level. Best estimates put the number of people making it to the top of Everest at about 3,000.
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SPORTS
May 11, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Two hundred Japanese, Chinese and Nepalese spent $12.5 million and a life to show a dozen of their number on live television from the top of Mt. Everest last week. The feat raised the hackles of some traditional mountain climbers. Jim Whittaker, a member of the first American team to reach that 29,028-foot summit 25 years ago this month, called the recent feat "a mob scene." Malcolm Daly, a mountaineering instructor and guide in Denver, said: "I have mixed feelings about it.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first U.S. climber to conquer Mt. Everest now aspires to be the Fuller Brush man of environmentalism. Jim Whittaker, who climbed the Himalayan peak in 1963, has launched a direct-sales company to market environmentally benign household products. More than 800 part-time environmentalists/entrepreneurs in Oregon and Washington already preach preservation while they sell cleansers, soaps and toilet paper through Greenway, Whittaker's 2-year-old firm. His next target market: California.
SPORTS
June 13, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Well, that did it, Jim Whittaker figured, he ruined Everest for everybody. Turned the world's highest mountain into a molehill, he did, putting so many people from his International Peace Climb expedition on top that the next ones will come looking for the escalator. "It's almost embarrassing," were Whittaker's first words radioed from Base Camp. "People will think it was easy." No previous expedition had ever put 20 climbers on top. A Norwegian team had 17 reach the summit in 1985.
SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
This column is for the adventuresome, and buying tickets to a Lakers game and yelling at the referees does not qualify. Fifty years ago - May 1, 1963, to be exact - a tall and slender man named Jim Whittaker stood at the summit of Mt. Everest. That's 29,028 feet above sea level, or about as high as you are when you fly coast to coast in a commercial jet. Think of looking out the window and having somebody wave at you at eye level. Best estimates put the number of people making it to the top of Everest at about 3,000.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Chinese, American and Soviet mountaineers plan to scale Mt. Everest and clean up some of the 2 tons of discarded tents, oxygen bottles and other garbage left by generations of climbers on the world's highest peak. The expedition--a new kind of superpower summitry--is China's biggest joint cultural undertaking with any foreign country since June, when its violent crackdown on protesters strained ties with many countries. Jim Whittaker of Port Townsend, Wash.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | From Associated Press
Six climbers from the United States, China and Soviet Union reached the top of Mt. Everest today in an expedition intended to foster goodwill among their nations and pick trash off the world's highest peak. The official New China News Agency said they reached the summit of the 29,028-foot-high peak this afternoon. In Seattle, Dianne Roberts, spokeswoman for the expedition, said she learned of the ascent by radio.
SPORTS
June 13, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Well, that did it, Jim Whittaker figured, he ruined Everest for everybody. Turned the world's highest mountain into a molehill, he did, putting so many people from his International Peace Climb expedition on top that the next ones will come looking for the escalator. "It's almost embarrassing," were Whittaker's first words radioed from Base Camp. "People will think it was easy." No previous expedition had ever put 20 climbers on top. A Norwegian team had 17 reach the summit in 1985.
SPORTS
May 11, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Two hundred Japanese, Chinese and Nepalese spent $12.5 million and a life to show a dozen of their number on live television from the top of Mt. Everest last week. The feat raised the hackles of some traditional mountain climbers. Jim Whittaker, a member of the first American team to reach that 29,028-foot summit 25 years ago this month, called the recent feat "a mob scene." Malcolm Daly, a mountaineering instructor and guide in Denver, said: "I have mixed feelings about it.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | From Reuters
Peter Hillary, the son of the first man to climb Mt. Everest, has begun his own bid to scale the world's highest peak, the Nepalese Tourism Ministry said. Hillary, 32, whose father, Sir Edmund Hillary, made the first ascent of Everest in May, 1953, along with Tenzing Norgay Sherpa, is leading a four-member team of New Zealanders and Australians. They pitched their base camp at 18,470 feet on Aug. 23, according to the ministry spokesman.
TRAVEL
June 29, 2008 | Associated Press; Reuters
1 China Scattered with the debris of more than 50 years of climbing -- oxygen canisters, tents and backpacks -- Mt. Everest has been called the world's highest garbage dump. China is moving to clean up its northern side of the mountain and protect its fragile Himalayan environment. Last week, an official announced a trash-collection campaign and indicated that fewer climbers and other visitors may be allowed next year. "Our target is to keep even more people from abusing Mt.
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