Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJim Wickwire
IN THE NEWS

Jim Wickwire

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Affirmation of life is not in facing death; it's in facing life. And so it is that after three decades climbing into the ice and cold and thin air of the world's great peaks, after turning his back on the highest summit of all, after giving up mountaineering and promising his wife that he was home to stay--after all that--Jim Wickwire changed his mind. He is going back. To Everest. "The reasons are not entirely clear to me," Wickwire, 52, says to the obvious.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Affirmation of life is not in facing death; it's in facing life. And so it is that after three decades climbing into the ice and cold and thin air of the world's great peaks, after turning his back on the highest summit of all, after giving up mountaineering and promising his wife that he was home to stay--after all that--Jim Wickwire changed his mind. He is going back. To Everest. "The reasons are not entirely clear to me," Wickwire, 52, says to the obvious.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | BILL STALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty years ago next month, as his British team struggled toward the 29,028-foot summit of the world, expedition leader John Hunt walked to the edge of Mt. Everest's south shoulder to peer down the precipitous eastern face plunging to the jumbled Kangshung Glacier. It was a thrilling and appalling site for a mountaineer: 7,000 vertical feet of rock, snow and ice--a Himalayan house of cards the height of seven Eiffel Towers. "This will never be climbed," Hunt concluded. It has been, of course.
SPORTS
June 12, 1992 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Art Grimes expected bad weather when he went to Alaska to climb Mt. McKinley early in May. Grimes, 37, a salesman from Dana Point, has been mountaineering since he was a teen-ager and was well aware of McKinley's reputation as a bad-weather mountain. "We were all prepared for a couple of storm days, and we knew it would be cold," he said. Sure enough, within days of his expedition's start for McKinley's 20,320-foot summit, the highest point on the continent, the first snowstorm hit.
SPORTS
May 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
GLACIER BAY NATIONAL PARK, Alaska -- As the pilot guided the single-engine Piper Cherokee closer to an unclimbed mountain known as 8290, passenger Kevin Mahoney's smile grew. Mahoney gazed at the sharp, snowcapped peak, sizing it up for an attempt he and three partners will make to be the first to stand on its summit. Even if they don't reach the top, they will achieve their other goal during the three-week expedition into unknown territory: helping a cancer research center raise awareness about what's needed to fight the disease that recently claimed Mahoney's mother.
NEWS
September 19, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wind shrieks down the glacier like a midnight train. At 3 a.m., 16 souls, their lives attached to slim strands of rope strung up the side of the ice, plod their way upward through the howling night air. Each has paid $400 for this dubious privilege. Behind is 11,000 feet of alpine meadows, volcanic rock and pitched slopes of snow, most of it traversed step by painful step over the better part of three days.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|