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Jimmie Dale Gilmore

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This was weird: Here Texas singer-songwriter Jimmie Dale Gilmore is one of the most respected, critically lauded and decidedly individualistic performers in country music today, and the Taste of Orange County folks perhaps didn't quite know who he was. Rather than put Gilmore on the main stage at night, when thousands more would have been in attendance, they stuck him on the small Miller Draft stage in front of 170 or so people sweltering in Sunday's blazing afternoon heat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Texas singer-songwriter Joe Ely has been in love with trains his whole life. In 1977, he recorded one of the great train songs -- "Boxcars," which his longtime pal Butch Hancock wrote -- laying out exactly what had hooked him over the course of countless rides in open freight cars journeying to and from his hometown of Lubbock. If you ever heard the whistle on a fast freight train Beatin' out a beautiful tune If you ever seen the cold blue railroad tracks Shinin' by the light of the moon If you ever felt a locomotive shake the ground I know you don't have to be told Why I'm going down to the railroad tracks And watch them lonesome boxcars roll "My grandfather worked the Rock Island line, and my father worked on the Santa Fe line," Ely, 62, said Sunday night following his performance at Burt's Tiki Lounge, about two blocks from the Albuquerque train station.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmie Dale Gilmore and his record label parted ways about a year after the release of the singer-songwriter's critically praised but commercially disappointing "Braver Newer World" (1996). So the philosophical Texan with the distinctive, fluttering voice understandably has kept a low profile of late. Except in the film world. In fact, three recent projects have enlarged Gilmore's resume. He made his acting debut in the Coen brothers' latest adventure, "The Big Lebowski."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the fabled West Texas band the Flatlanders made a list of reasons to reconvene almost 30 years after recording its only album, cashing in on past fortunes surely wouldn't be on it. "Yes, here comes the payoff gig," jokes Butch Hancock, 55, whose friendship with fellow Lubbock singer-songwriters Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Joe Ely turned into the musical collaboration that became the Flatlanders.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1994 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You've got to hand it to the folks who run the Crazy Horse Steak House for booking Jimmie Dale Gilmore. A singer-songwriter from Texas, Gilmore is as much like your typical country musician as sushi is like a McDonald's fish sandwich. Of course, each of those culinary creations has its fans, and Gilmore packed the Crazy Horse Monday night as tightly as the mainstream, radio-friendly country acts that dominate the club's schedule. But what a difference in content.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for The Times
Jimmie Dale Gilmore is walking toward the exit of the NBC-TV studio in Burbank following his appearance on "The Tonight Show" when he runs into Kevin Eubanks, the guitarist in the show's house band. Eubanks praises the singer's performance, saying that the resident musicians always enjoy listening to a guest who does "the real thing."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Texas singer-songwriter Joe Ely has been in love with trains his whole life. In 1977, he recorded one of the great train songs -- "Boxcars," which his longtime pal Butch Hancock wrote -- laying out exactly what had hooked him over the course of countless rides in open freight cars journeying to and from his hometown of Lubbock. If you ever heard the whistle on a fast freight train Beatin' out a beautiful tune If you ever seen the cold blue railroad tracks Shinin' by the light of the moon If you ever felt a locomotive shake the ground I know you don't have to be told Why I'm going down to the railroad tracks And watch them lonesome boxcars roll "My grandfather worked the Rock Island line, and my father worked on the Santa Fe line," Ely, 62, said Sunday night following his performance at Burt's Tiki Lounge, about two blocks from the Albuquerque train station.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000
SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO 8pm Pop Music What's the sound of one hand clapping? Certainly not what you hear whenever Zen country crooner Jimmie Dale Gilmore comes to town. His latest album, "One Endless Night," finds the Texas songwriter's songwriter paying tribute to many of the writers he most admires.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1996 | Steve Hochman
* * * 1/2 Jimmie Dale Gilmore, "Braver Newer World," Elektra. While not as dramatic as the Emmylou Harris-Daniel Lanois collaboration, the pairing of the Texas troubadour with producer T-Bone Burnett results in some stunning new spins. Colorful string and horn arrangements recall Jimmy Webb while underscoring Gilmore's hopeless-romantic bent, and the closing "Outside the Lines" is an atypical but irresistible rocker.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000
SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO 8pm Pop Music What's the sound of one hand clapping? Certainly not what you hear whenever Zen country crooner Jimmie Dale Gilmore comes to town. His latest album, "One Endless Night," finds the Texas songwriter's songwriter paying tribute to many of the writers he most admires.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS
Texas' favorite Zen-country singer-songwriter explores the endless search that fills so much of human existence: the search for an old love, a lost opportunity, a single moment of bliss. He does it, as usual, with the disarming directness and gentility of a seasoned tour guide.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmie Dale Gilmore, the Texas troubadour who may be the folksiest philosopher in pop music, went "Seinfeld" one better Friday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano. Gilmore put on a show about everything, and disguised it as a show about nothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmie Dale Gilmore and his record label parted ways about a year after the release of the singer-songwriter's critically praised but commercially disappointing "Braver Newer World" (1996). So the philosophical Texan with the distinctive, fluttering voice understandably has kept a low profile of late. Except in the film world. In fact, three recent projects have enlarged Gilmore's resume. He made his acting debut in the Coen brothers' latest adventure, "The Big Lebowski."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM
One thing Jimmie Dale Gilmore would like to do if he ever makes a real bundle from his music is to finance a recording by Al Strehli Jr., a Lubbock songwriter hardly known outside the credit lines on Gilmore's past two albums. Gilmore, who included two Strehli songs on each release, said he has known him since 1966 or so. "He's real reclusive; he's never even played in a band," Gilmore said. "It's a paradoxical situation, because he doesn't like publicity, and I'm always raving about him.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This was weird: Here Texas singer-songwriter Jimmie Dale Gilmore is one of the most respected, critically lauded and decidedly individualistic performers in country music today, and the Taste of Orange County folks perhaps didn't quite know who he was. Rather than put Gilmore on the main stage at night, when thousands more would have been in attendance, they stuck him on the small Miller Draft stage in front of 170 or so people sweltering in Sunday's blazing afternoon heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM
One thing Jimmie Dale Gilmore would like to do if he ever makes a real bundle from his music is to finance a recording by Al Strehli Jr., a Lubbock songwriter hardly known outside the credit lines on Gilmore's past two albums. Gilmore, who included two Strehli songs on each release, said he has known him since 1966 or so. "He's real reclusive; he's never even played in a band," Gilmore said. "It's a paradoxical situation, because he doesn't like publicity, and I'm always raving about him.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
Los Lobos and Jimmie Dale Gilmore are the top names on this year's Taste of Orange County music roster. There's strength elsewhere in the lineup, too, as Taste presents an interesting array of national acts and local performers in jazz, rock, country and R&B. Los Lobos, which headlines at 9:30 p.m. on Friday, has long been one of the most diverse and accomplished bands on the roots-rock scene.
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