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August 22, 1993 | KRISTINE MCKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
The ultimate in politically correct art would, of course, be art that refused to participate in the money-driven art market in any way whatsoever. What that means is that you, the consumer/art viewer, would never even hear of it. This brings us to Jimmie Durham--an artist most people probably haven't heard of. A Cherokee Indian who's lived in Cuernavaca, Mexico, since 1986, Durham will show his work in Los Angeles for the first time beginning Saturday at the L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1993
Regarding "Money Can't Buy This Guy's Love," by Kristine McKenna (Aug. 22): After reading of Jimmie Durham's marketing philosophy, I said to friends who seemed awed by the overt altruism spread across your pages: "Hold it for a moment; there's got to be a perspective here." This is, after all, the world in which we live, and not the world of which we dream. When we see Durham's show at L.A. Louver, are we going to see a show without a price list? If I'm crazy about one of his objects, will the gallery give it to me?
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1993
Regarding "Money Can't Buy This Guy's Love," by Kristine McKenna (Aug. 22): After reading of Jimmie Durham's marketing philosophy, I said to friends who seemed awed by the overt altruism spread across your pages: "Hold it for a moment; there's got to be a perspective here." This is, after all, the world in which we live, and not the world of which we dream. When we see Durham's show at L.A. Louver, are we going to see a show without a price list? If I'm crazy about one of his objects, will the gallery give it to me?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1993 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmie Durham is a Cherokee Indian--though not recognized as such by the U.S. government since he lacks an "official" registration number. It is, therefore, somehow fitting that Durham makes art that is absurd and about absurdity--the absurdity of all brands of "officialdom"; the absurdity of being a native of an America where natives are regularly conjured as aliens; and, of course, the absurdity of making art.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1993 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmie Durham is a Cherokee Indian--though not recognized as such by the U.S. government since he lacks an "official" registration number. It is, therefore, somehow fitting that Durham makes art that is absurd and about absurdity--the absurdity of all brands of "officialdom"; the absurdity of being a native of an America where natives are regularly conjured as aliens; and, of course, the absurdity of making art.
BOOKS
September 13, 1987 | Louis D. Owens, Owens is the author of "American Indian Novelists." and
Beginning as far back as 1927 with Mourning Dove's novel, "Cogewea: The Half-Blood," American Indian writing in this century has been primarily the realm of the mixed blood bent on articulating an identity within the tense no man's land that lies between cultures.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Times asked its reporters and critics to highlight figures in entertainment and the arts who will be making news in 2014. Here's who they picked: Anne Ellegood | Curator Hammer Museum Senior Curator Anne Ellegood will likely see some attention this spring with the debut of her long-mulled, provocative show "Take It or Leave It: Institution, Image, Ideology. " The 35-artist historical show - co-organized by Ellegood's friend, New York-based art historian Johanna Burton - is an institutional critique of museums themselves as it examines American artists who the curators felt have changed the way we, as a culture, think about art. Among those included in the exhibition, focusing on work largely from the '80s and '90s, are Barbara Kruger, Mike Kelley, Jimmie Durham, Adrian Piper and David Wojnarowicz.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As chief curator of the Southwest Museum, Kathleen Whitaker defines her job as bringing the work of American Indian artists, who typically have difficulty breaking into mainstream galleries, to the attention of collectors. But for the first time in the Southwest's 80-year history, the museum must ask a question that some are saying makes institutions specializing in American Indian art more exclusive than restricted country clubs: "Are you really an American Indian and can you prove it?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Lately, there have been several dozen exhibitions with the words body politic lurking somewhere in their titles. OK, so there have been only three that I know of. It just seems like dozens. The reason it seems like dozens is that politics, especially political issues surrounding social control of the individual's body, have been central to much art-making by younger artists of the past decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1994 | CATHY CURTIS
Nothing is black and white about photographs except the effect of light on the film emulsion. Although filled with concrete details, photographs may exude intangible, between-the-lines emotions. They may show real people in settings or activities that are a figment of the photographer's imagination. The passage of time may expose their lies or deepen their mysteries--or both. At the UC Irvine Fine Arts Gallery through Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1993 | KRISTINE MCKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
The ultimate in politically correct art would, of course, be art that refused to participate in the money-driven art market in any way whatsoever. What that means is that you, the consumer/art viewer, would never even hear of it. This brings us to Jimmie Durham--an artist most people probably haven't heard of. A Cherokee Indian who's lived in Cuernavaca, Mexico, since 1986, Durham will show his work in Los Angeles for the first time beginning Saturday at the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1995 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
Jose Bedia looks every bit the urban guy of the '90s, with his requisite pony tail, sneakers, T-shirt and denim jacket. But nothing about the Cuban-born artist's appearance says more about his place in the world than a small beaded badge pinned to the pocket over his heart. Its vibrant red, green and orange design, representing a tepee, was made by Canadian Indians.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2004 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Efficiency has always been John Wesley's strong suit. No extraneous lines or unnecessary colors clutter his crisp Pop pictures of people and beasts. For more than 40 years, the L.A.-born, New York-based painter has been refining his knack for packing loads of emotional resonance into images as simple and direct -- and sometimes as strange -- as the Sunday comics.
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