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Jimmie Reese

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November 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
Pitcher Mark Langston of the Angels won his sixth Gold Glove, his fourth in a row, on Tuesday and dedicated the award to Jimmie Reese, the longtime Angel coach who died this year at age 92. Langston started 18 games and had 27 putouts. "(Reese) had a great deal to do with my fielding success, as well as the defensive skills of my teammates," Langston said.
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SPORTS
August 27, 2009 | Bill Shaikin
Darren Oliver got this question from his wife the other day: "Hey, honey, are you going to play again next year?" The Angels' left-handed reliever knew better than to tell his wife he had made that decision by himself. His wife and two sons have returned home to Texas for the start of the school year and the football season, and he'll sit down with the family this fall to discuss whether to extend his professional career into a fourth decade. "I'm leaning more toward playing than retiring," Oliver said.
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SPORTS
July 14, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE and CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four months ago, on a sweltering day during the Angels' spring training camp, Jimmie Reese stood on the practice field, hitting grounder after grounder to pitcher Julio Valera. Reese, who could work wonders with his fungo bat, had Valera moving to his left, to his right, back and forth. "Jimmie, aren't you getting tired?" he moaned. Said Reese: "I'm doing just fine, son. You keep standing there, and I'll keep hitting them." Valera, 25, hung his head in disbelief.
SPORTS
August 5, 1995
What happened to the real California Angels? I hope they never show up. GEORGE GARDNER North Hollywood What were the Angels waiting for before they inducted 90-year-old fan favorite Jimmie Reese into their Hall of Fame? His death? JIM HARRIGAN Manhattan Beach
SPORTS
August 28, 1988 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Today, before their game against the New York Yankees, the Angels will honor a man with three years of major league playing experience--during the Hoover Administration--and an unsurpassed knack of hitting with half a bat. Today, Jimmie Reese, Angel conditioning coach, gets his day. He last got one 61 years ago. He hit .337 in 1927 for the Oakland Oaks of the Pacific Coast League, so the Oakland management had a "Jimmie Reese Day" and gave him $1,000 and a suitcase full of clothes.
SPORTS
July 29, 1990 | AL STUMP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Standing on first base after singling for the New York Yankees in 1930, 25-year-old Jimmie Reese felt real fear for the first time in a ballpark. "Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig hit in the next spots behind me," he said. "When those lefties pulled shots my way, all I got was a half-second flash of white. Sometimes their drives would clip my shirt-- swish! --before I could begin to duck. It was the only time I've been terrified.
SPORTS
August 3, 1995 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nolan Ryan again stood before a cheering Anaheim Stadium crowd Wednesday night. This time, his pitch was different. Ryan was there to honor the late Jimmie Reese, who was inducted into the Angels' Hall of Fame. He and Rod Carew spoke during a pregame ceremony that ended with the presentation of a bronze bust of Reese and the retiring of his No. 50. For Ryan, who spent eight years with the Angels, it was a moment to frame.
SPORTS
July 16, 1994 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Angel Gary Pettis took a breath, smiled, then told his Jimmie Reese story. "A guy hit a home run against us one day. I get back to the dugout and Jimmie said, 'Mullion, how come you didn't catch that one?' I said, 'Jimmie, it was 10 rows back.' He said, 'Come out early tomorrow, and we'll work on it.' " Reese, who died Wednesday at 92, was remembered Friday, not only with tears, but smiles.
SPORTS
July 23, 1994
Jimmie Reese left no (immediate family) survivors, so the Angels kindly provided him with a Christian (memorial service). However, it would seem that Angel errors are not limited to the playing field because I believe Jimmie Reese was Jewish. A Times article several years ago contained an anecdote about a celebrity baseball game in the 1940s. Songwriter Harry Ruby was pitching and told his catcher to dispense with the signs and just call out the pitches in Yiddish, since the batters would not understand this language.
SPORTS
April 10, 1991
Angel conditioning coach Jimmie Reese, who was hospitalized for treatment of phlebitis in his left leg during the last week of spring training, has been released from St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange and is at his Westwood home. Reese, 86, is expected to be in uniform for the Angels' home opener Monday against the Oakland Athletics.
SPORTS
August 3, 1995 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nolan Ryan again stood before a cheering Anaheim Stadium crowd Wednesday night. This time, his pitch was different. Ryan was there to honor the late Jimmie Reese, who was inducted into the Angels' Hall of Fame. He and Rod Carew spoke during a pregame ceremony that ended with the presentation of a bronze bust of Reese and the retiring of his No. 50. For Ryan, who spent eight years with the Angels, it was a moment to frame.
SPORTS
November 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
Pitcher Mark Langston of the Angels won his sixth Gold Glove, his fourth in a row, on Tuesday and dedicated the award to Jimmie Reese, the longtime Angel coach who died this year at age 92. Langston started 18 games and had 27 putouts. "(Reese) had a great deal to do with my fielding success, as well as the defensive skills of my teammates," Langston said.
SPORTS
July 23, 1994
Jimmie Reese left no (immediate family) survivors, so the Angels kindly provided him with a Christian (memorial service). However, it would seem that Angel errors are not limited to the playing field because I believe Jimmie Reese was Jewish. A Times article several years ago contained an anecdote about a celebrity baseball game in the 1940s. Songwriter Harry Ruby was pitching and told his catcher to dispense with the signs and just call out the pitches in Yiddish, since the batters would not understand this language.
SPORTS
July 16, 1994 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Angel Gary Pettis took a breath, smiled, then told his Jimmie Reese story. "A guy hit a home run against us one day. I get back to the dugout and Jimmie said, 'Mullion, how come you didn't catch that one?' I said, 'Jimmie, it was 10 rows back.' He said, 'Come out early tomorrow, and we'll work on it.' " Reese, who died Wednesday at 92, was remembered Friday, not only with tears, but smiles.
SPORTS
July 15, 1994 | MIKE PENNER
At first I was thinking they should name Anaheim Stadium after Jimmie Reese. But Anaheim Stadium, at age 28, is past its prime, out of date and out of fashion, which is something Jimmie, in all his 92 3/4 years, never was. Jimmie deserves better than that. Maybe they can name the new stadium after him, if and when it is built. Jimmie Reese Park has a nice ring. Fungo Field.
SPORTS
July 15, 1994 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks ago, John Cox was doing the same thing he did every time he had the opportunity 20 years ago. Fielding fungoes off a bat swung by Jimmie Reese. Reese was in a Santa Ana convalescent center and the staff was having trouble persuading him to get out of bed. Angel coach Bobby Knoop had left a few baseballs and Reese's favorite fungo bat in the room, so Cox saw his cue. "I said, 'C'mon, I need a few more,' " Cox said.
SPORTS
August 5, 1995
What happened to the real California Angels? I hope they never show up. GEORGE GARDNER North Hollywood What were the Angels waiting for before they inducted 90-year-old fan favorite Jimmie Reese into their Hall of Fame? His death? JIM HARRIGAN Manhattan Beach
SPORTS
February 15, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Angel coach Jimmie Reese, 92, who was too ill to be in uniform the second half of the 1993 season, is scheduled to leave today to rejoin the team for the opening of their spring training camp in Tempe, Ariz. Reese, with the title of conditioning coach, will be entering his 78th season of professional baseball and 22nd with the Angels. He was hospitalized twice last season, and was unable even to attend games the second half.
SPORTS
July 15, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Nolan Ryan, who named his second son after Jimmie Reese because of his deep admiration for the late Angel coach, said he will attend today's memorial service for Reese in Santa Ana. "I can't begin to tell you how much he meant to me," said Ryan from his Texas home. "He was a very special part of my life and always will be. When you think of the Angels, you think of him. I don't think that will ever change."
SPORTS
July 15, 1994 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel starter Mark Langston, who hates to talk, much less acknowledge anyone on the days he pitches, abruptly stopped his warm-up pitches in the bullpen. He walked toward the outfield fence Thursday night and intently watched the video board, unwilling to miss a moment of the tribute to his dear friend, Jimmie Reese. There was no one closer to Reese than Langston on the current roster.
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