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Jimmie Rodgers

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August 10, 1997 | Richard Cromelin, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar
Two notable things happened on Oct. 7, 1927: Babe Ruth hit a World Series home run and Jimmie Rodgers' first record went on sale. Even though Ruth was at the pinnacle of his fame and Rodgers was unknown, the intersecting events form a neat symbolic link between two defining figures of the century. Ruth's prowess and charisma transformed the game of baseball. Similarly, Rodgers single-handedly changed the shape of American popular music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2008 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Bear Family Records' remarkable new release, "Let Me Be Your Sidetrack: The Influence of Jimmie Rodgers," makes a persuasive argument that Rodgers is one of the most important figures in the history of country music. According to the liner notes for the six-disc boxed set released last week, 102 of the 109 songs Rodgers did in the late 1920s and early 1930s were later recorded by other artists -- a 94% "cover ratio" unmatched by any other country singer-songwriter, including Hank Williams.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1992 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in bib overalls, a railroader's denim cap and red bandanna, 79-year-old Otis Roy crooned in a drawling voice for a crowd of shoppers at an outdoor market in San Dimas. "I got a barrel of flour," he sang. "Lord, I got a bucket of lard. I ain't got no blues. . . . Got corn in my crib, cotton growing in my patch." His audience seemed intrigued, even if none were likely to recognize the song, "No Hard Times."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
The name Charlie Poole could cause even a lot of country music aficionados to plead ignorance, yet he's described as "the patron saint" of the genre in liner notes for the new three-CD box set "You Ain't Talkin' to Me: Charlie Poole and the Roots of Country Music" (Legacy Recordings, www.legacyrecordings.com).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Most of the songs played in the Jimmie Rodgers tribute at Jacks Sugar Shack on Tuesday, marking the 65th anniversary of the death of the Singing Brakeman, were not Rodgers tunes. Instead, the performers more often offered material from their regular repertoires, throwing maybe one or two Rodgers numbers into their brief sets. But that didn't diminish the celebration of the man generally recognized as the father of country music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Steve Hochman
Reverence for the Singing Brakeman is so high that even Bono, in the strings-backed "Dreaming With Tears in My Eyes," turns in his most straightforward vocal since, well, ever. And most of the cast, from Alison Krauss to Jerry Garcia to organizer Bob Dylan stick to basic variations of nostalgic Dixie swing, which is fine--the songs are classics. But only down 'n' dirty John Mellencamp ("Gambling Bar Room Blues") and jazzy Van Morrison ("Mule Skinner Blues") give any new spins.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
The name Charlie Poole could cause even a lot of country music aficionados to plead ignorance, yet he's described as "the patron saint" of the genre in liner notes for the new three-CD box set "You Ain't Talkin' to Me: Charlie Poole and the Roots of Country Music" (Legacy Recordings, www.legacyrecordings.com).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2008 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Bear Family Records' remarkable new release, "Let Me Be Your Sidetrack: The Influence of Jimmie Rodgers," makes a persuasive argument that Rodgers is one of the most important figures in the history of country music. According to the liner notes for the six-disc boxed set released last week, 102 of the 109 songs Rodgers did in the late 1920s and early 1930s were later recorded by other artists -- a 94% "cover ratio" unmatched by any other country singer-songwriter, including Hank Williams.
SPORTS
June 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Boston Celtics tapped Chris Ford as their new coach today, moving the longtime assistant coach of the club into the top spot. Team officials described Ford as "a guy who is truly a Celtic, a guy who has paid his dues." Ford told a news conference that he expects his tenure to be "a good time." He added, though, that it is "going to take a lot of hard work and dedication to get us back on top."
SPORTS
December 24, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's only natural for fathers to be interested in the athletic careers of their sons. The only drawback is many don't have enough time to become involved because of job commitments. That isn't a problem for Jimmy Rodgers, the former Boston Celtic coach. He has the time and financial security to do whatever he wants. So his avocation is watching his son, Matt, play quarterback for the Iowa Hawkeyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1999 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a record executive going on a talent search at the outset of the rock era and discovering Elvis Presley and the Beatles within two weeks of each other. Ralph Peer came close. In 1927, when the New York talent agent traveled to Bristol, Tenn., he discovered Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family, who were every bit as important to country music, artistically and commercially, as the King of Rock 'n' Roll and the Fab Four were to rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Most of the songs played in the Jimmie Rodgers tribute at Jacks Sugar Shack on Tuesday, marking the 65th anniversary of the death of the Singing Brakeman, were not Rodgers tunes. Instead, the performers more often offered material from their regular repertoires, throwing maybe one or two Rodgers numbers into their brief sets. But that didn't diminish the celebration of the man generally recognized as the father of country music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Steve Hochman
Reverence for the Singing Brakeman is so high that even Bono, in the strings-backed "Dreaming With Tears in My Eyes," turns in his most straightforward vocal since, well, ever. And most of the cast, from Alison Krauss to Jerry Garcia to organizer Bob Dylan stick to basic variations of nostalgic Dixie swing, which is fine--the songs are classics. But only down 'n' dirty John Mellencamp ("Gambling Bar Room Blues") and jazzy Van Morrison ("Mule Skinner Blues") give any new spins.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1997 | Richard Cromelin, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar
Two notable things happened on Oct. 7, 1927: Babe Ruth hit a World Series home run and Jimmie Rodgers' first record went on sale. Even though Ruth was at the pinnacle of his fame and Rodgers was unknown, the intersecting events form a neat symbolic link between two defining figures of the century. Ruth's prowess and charisma transformed the game of baseball. Similarly, Rodgers single-handedly changed the shape of American popular music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1992 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in bib overalls, a railroader's denim cap and red bandanna, 79-year-old Otis Roy crooned in a drawling voice for a crowd of shoppers at an outdoor market in San Dimas. "I got a barrel of flour," he sang. "Lord, I got a bucket of lard. I ain't got no blues. . . . Got corn in my crib, cotton growing in my patch." His audience seemed intrigued, even if none were likely to recognize the song, "No Hard Times."
SPORTS
December 24, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's only natural for fathers to be interested in the athletic careers of their sons. The only drawback is many don't have enough time to become involved because of job commitments. That isn't a problem for Jimmy Rodgers, the former Boston Celtic coach. He has the time and financial security to do whatever he wants. So his avocation is watching his son, Matt, play quarterback for the Iowa Hawkeyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1999 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a record executive going on a talent search at the outset of the rock era and discovering Elvis Presley and the Beatles within two weeks of each other. Ralph Peer came close. In 1927, when the New York talent agent traveled to Bristol, Tenn., he discovered Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family, who were every bit as important to country music, artistically and commercially, as the King of Rock 'n' Roll and the Fab Four were to rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1990 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as singer Patty Booker and her band mates in the Hired Hands are concerned, when God invented country music, on the first day He created Buck Owens and the Bakersfield sound. Indeed, to this vibrant band that spends most nights pounding out country classics as well as its own compositions in a handful of Orange County honky-tonks, country music's Golden Age wasn't the early '30s of Jimmie Rodgers or the late '40s of Hank Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1990 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as singer Patty Booker and her band mates in the Hired Hands are concerned, when God invented country music, on the first day He created Buck Owens and the Bakersfield sound. Indeed, to this vibrant band that spends most nights pounding out country classics as well as its own compositions in a handful of Orange County honky-tonks, country music's Golden Age wasn't the early '30s of Jimmie Rodgers or the late '40s of Hank Williams.
SPORTS
June 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Boston Celtics tapped Chris Ford as their new coach today, moving the longtime assistant coach of the club into the top spot. Team officials described Ford as "a guy who is truly a Celtic, a guy who has paid his dues." Ford told a news conference that he expects his tenure to be "a good time." He added, though, that it is "going to take a lot of hard work and dedication to get us back on top."
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