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Jimmy Breslin

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Branch Rickey Jimmy Breslin Viking/Penguin Lives: 148 pp., $19.95 "I had a problem for a writer," Jimmy Breslin tells us in the prologue to "Branch Rickey," his impressionistic portrait of baseball's great emancipator, the man responsible for bringing Jackie Robinson to the major leagues. "The rule I followed from my first day as a copyboy in the sports departments was that you couldn't write about a game unless you went to see it. … The trouble is, I spoke to Branch Rickey only once in my whole life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Branch Rickey Jimmy Breslin Viking/Penguin Lives: 148 pp., $19.95 "I had a problem for a writer," Jimmy Breslin tells us in the prologue to "Branch Rickey," his impressionistic portrait of baseball's great emancipator, the man responsible for bringing Jackie Robinson to the major leagues. "The rule I followed from my first day as a copyboy in the sports departments was that you couldn't write about a game unless you went to see it. … The trouble is, I spoke to Branch Rickey only once in my whole life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Oregonian has dropped Jimmy Breslin's syndicated column because of racial slurs he made about a co-worker, the newspaper announced Thursday. Breslin recently lambasted a Korean-American reporter with New York Newsday in the newsroom after she criticized one of his columns as sexist. The reporter wasn't present during the obscenity-laced outburst. On May 8, Newsday suspended Breslin for two weeks. Reached by telephone in New York, Breslin had little comment about the Oregonian's action.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2009 | Associated Press
The daughter of writer Jimmy Breslin has died after collapsing at a New York City restaurant four days earlier. Bellevue Hospital Center spokesman Stephen Bohlen said Kelly Breslin died at the hospital Tuesday night. The cause was not immediately known. The 44-year-old woman had no pulse and wasn't breathing after she passed out at L'Express restaurant last Friday. She was with three friends. The 79-year-old Breslin is an author and has worked as a columnist for Newsday, the New York Daily News and New York magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
Opinionated and outspoken to the last. In his last regular column, published in Newsday on Tuesday, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Jimmy Breslin said he was so sure Democratic nominee John Kerry was going to win the presidential race easily that he wasn't even going to stay up to watch the election returns on television. "So I go to bed with total confidence.... And I leave today as the only one in America who from the start was sure John Kerry would win by a large margin," Breslin wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1986 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Jimmy Breslin may not be the world's last passionate man, but you have the feeling that he's one of a group so small it could convene at a table in the Automat--and it was never that large a group to begin with. Breslin, who won a Pulitzer Prize not long ago for his three-a-week columns in the New York Daily News, is large, profane, restless, enthusiastic and urgent.
BOOKS
May 18, 1986 | William Hochswender, Hochswender, the features editor of Harper's Bazaar, grew up in an Irish-German neighborhood to the south of Queens. and
Jimmy Breslin has given us novels before--and innumerable stories, large and small, in his much-honored newspaper column--but never has he been so generous with his talent. "Table Money" is a heavyweight saga in an era of welterweights, a big fat book that's bone-hard all the way through.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 40 years, Jimmy Breslin has turned words into weapons. A rumpled, cigar-smoking man who drinks hard and writes harder, the Pulitzer Prize-winning newsman has pummeled the privileged and defended the down-and-out in tough, bare-knuckled columns read by millions of New Yorkers. Brash. Insulting. Street-smart. Compassionate. Nobody personifies the brawling, in-your-face side of the Big Apple better than the Irish-American Breslin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2008 | David L. Ulin, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK has always been a gangster's paradise. That's part of its romance and its lore. From groups like the 19th century Plug Uglies, immortalized in Herbert Asbury's 1928 "The Gangs of New York," to their 20th century counterpart, the Mafia, the city has a peculiar fascination with its least repentant miscreants, the ones who flaunt their lives outside the law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990 | From Tony Kornheiser's column in the Washington Post.
Last Friday, Jimmy Breslin burst out of his office at New York Newsday and spouted off sexist and racist invectives against an Asian-American colleague, a reporter, who had written an internal memo complaining of sexism in his column. Newsday has suspended him for two weeks without pay. Following are two views on the controversy. Some people have lumped Breslin with Al Campanis, Jimmy the Greek and Andy Rooney, all of whom came under fire for stupid remarks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Jim Bellows, a legendary editor who built a career resuscitating underdog big-city newspapers from Los Angeles to New York and helped turn Tom Wolfe and Jimmy Breslin into stars, has died. He was 86. Bellows, a longtime resident of Brentwood, died Friday at a nursing home in Santa Monica, according to his wife, Keven Bellows. The cause was Alzheimer's disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2008 | David L. Ulin, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK has always been a gangster's paradise. That's part of its romance and its lore. From groups like the 19th century Plug Uglies, immortalized in Herbert Asbury's 1928 "The Gangs of New York," to their 20th century counterpart, the Mafia, the city has a peculiar fascination with its least repentant miscreants, the ones who flaunt their lives outside the law.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
Opinionated and outspoken to the last. In his last regular column, published in Newsday on Tuesday, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Jimmy Breslin said he was so sure Democratic nominee John Kerry was going to win the presidential race easily that he wasn't even going to stay up to watch the election returns on television. "So I go to bed with total confidence.... And I leave today as the only one in America who from the start was sure John Kerry would win by a large margin," Breslin wrote.
BOOKS
May 19, 2002 | MICHAEL HARRIS, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
It began as a routine news story: In November 1999, an undocumented Mexican worker was killed when part of a condominium complex under construction collapsed in Brooklyn. He was on the third floor, which plunged to the basement, where he drowned in wet concrete 3 feet deep. He was 21. Then the story, from a media standpoint, became sexy. Big names and deep-seated corruption were involved. The condos collapsed because the developer, Eugene Ostreicher, was cutting corners.
BOOKS
July 8, 2001
THE UNKNOWN SIGRID UNDSET Jenny and Other Works Edited by Tim Page Translation from the Danish by Tina Nunnally; Steerforth Press: 424 pp., $30 Sigrid Undset was born in Denmark in 1882 but grew up in Norway. In 1928, she won the Nobel Prize for her epic trilogy, "Kristin Lavransdatter," set in medieval Scandinavia. Her first novel, "Jenny" (1911), along with two stories and several letters, all written before the author was 30, are included in "The Unknown Sigrid Undset."
BOOKS
September 15, 1996 | RICHARD EDER
Of course Jimmy Breslin, newspaper columnist and New York chronicler, did not develop a cerebral aneurysm just so that he could write about it. It was a hijacking or a drowning, and you don't arrange those. Still, here is Breslin with waterproof notebook and underwater pen to record both the drowning itself--a dangerous brain operation--and the flash-by of the past that drowning is said to elicit.
BOOKS
April 17, 1988 | William J. Hochswender, Hochswender is a writer living in New York
If New York has become the Emerald City for the young, the educated and the acquisitive, then the city in Jimmy Breslin's new novel, "He Got Hungry and Forgot His Manners," is the dark netherworld that seethes beneath the glitter. This is the other New York--of welfare mothers watching "Santa Barbara" and "Hawaii Five-0" in the rat-infested Flatbush Arms Hotel, and of prim tycoonesses who patronize good causes.
BOOKS
June 21, 1992
Re Jimmy Breslin's review of "Chief" (May 24): What Los Angeles really doesn't need is a (another) left-liberal "take" on Chief Daryl Gates, and especially one designed by that opinionated blatherskite Jimmy Breslin (from New York City, yet; maybe the crime capital of the world). For example: Excoriating Gates, and indeed the entire Los Angeles Police Department, for all human error on his watch (New York City police don't make any?), and for his refusal to take immediate retirement, Breslin cites former Mayor Abe Beame's disposal of what he judged to be a recalcitrant police commissioner: He terminated him with a stroke of his pen. Say, that worked out swell, what?
BOOKS
September 29, 1991 | John Schulian, Schulian, formerly a syndicated sports columnist in Chicago and Philadelphia, is co-executive producer of NBC-TV's "Reasonable Doubts."
When you look at the gray tapioca that American newspapers have become, it's hard to believe they ever spawned Damon Runyon, who covered his first hanging at 11 and grew up to create Broadway by populating it with Nicely-Nicely and Harry the Horse, Madame La Gimp, Nathan Detroit and Little Miss Marker. But Runyon lived in an age when a reporter could drink with a ballplayer named Bugs one day and go to the track with Pancho Villa the next.
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