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Jimmy Buffett

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NATIONAL
March 8, 2012 | By Ashley Powers
Jimmy Buffett's lyrics have always paired well with the  bottoms-up spirit of the Las Vegas Strip. Now the singer and entrepreneur is one step away from joining the ranks of the town's colorful casino moguls. The Nevada Gaming Control Board on Wednesday recommended that Buffett's company, Margaritaville Holdings, be granted a gambling license, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported . That would allow the company to share in the revenue of the Flamingo hotel's Margaritaville casino, which has 220 slot machines and a bar called -- what else?
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
It was an offhanded comment by singer-songwriter Jesse Winchester, but it stopped Elvis Costello cold when he was chatting with Winchester for his short-lived music-interview series “Spectacle” on the Sundance Channel a few years ago. In an aside, the inordinately gifted songwriter casually identified “The Brand New Tennessee Waltz” (one of the first songs for which he'd gained acclaim in the early 1970s) as the first song he'd ever written. Then he nonchalantly moved on to finish the main point he was making about the art of writing songs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Jimmy Buffett has never been a model of musical consistency. Like much of his past work, his concert Saturday night at the Hollywood Bowl contrasted literate, well-crafted songs with cheap and easy party anthems. Moving in fits and starts from song to song, Buffett tossed out an array of material filled with eccentric images--feeding frenzies among sharks, Gypsies on the loose, cheeseburgers in paradise and a last mango in Paris.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
Some people can be downright rude, one North Dakota restaurant reviewer learned this week. Not to mention snobby.  The story pits urbanites with endless culinary options against a prairie town with slim pickings. Marilyn Hagerty's review of a new Olive Garden in Grand Forks, N.D., seems to have struck a nerve among some city slickers. In an earnest, utilitarian column for the Grand Forks Herald, Hagerty wrote about the decor, the ambiance and the low-fat entrees available to those counting calories.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
Mention singer Jimmy Buffett and most music critics will gag. Let's face it, he doesn't sing very well. His songs, such as "If the Phone Doesn't Ring It's Me," "Cheeseburger in Paradise" and "Why Don't We Get Drunk," aren't models of good songwriting. Then why is he so popular? "Hell if I know," Buffett replied recently. He was just being modest. Buffett knows very well that he's the guru of the "Animal House" crowd. His party-time music is great background for frat parties.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's odd to go to a concert where the music is secondary to the real action. For Jimmy Buffett and his devoted fans (a.k.a. Parrot Heads), live performance has always been about everything but the music. Mainly it's about sporting shark hats, Hawaiian print shirts, leis and grass skirts while slamming down plenty of (choose any combination) beer, margaritas and pina coladas. Catching that party vibe is what matters, no?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jumping on the back of a Harley, racing at 100 m.p.h. in the dark with the headlights out--while she was drunk. This used to be how country-roots-rocker Marshall Chapman got her thrills. But in recent years, the South Carolina native has a different outlook on life and a new definition of excitement. Thanks primarily to an intensive, 4 1/2-week rehabilitation program for substance and alcohol abuse in 1988, Chapman discovered the sense of balance that eluded her for so long.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1992 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a warm afternoon three local musicians are rehearsing in the open garage of a home in Encinitas, surrounded by musical instruments, surfboards, and weight-lifting equipment. Looking on are two small children, a couple of adults, and a listless dog. It is a youthful tableau with a time-honored place in American iconography--a scene that is played out in a thousand suburban neighborhoods every day.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
That particularly bayou sound known in "N'Awlins" as zydeco is truly nationally popular now. Just look who showed up Sunday night in a French Quarter nightspot for the taping of an HBO special on the Cajun musical style: Jimmy Buffett, Herbie Hancock, Greg Allman, John Hiatt.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2012 | By Ashley Powers
Jimmy Buffett's lyrics have always paired well with the  bottoms-up spirit of the Las Vegas Strip. Now the singer and entrepreneur is one step away from joining the ranks of the town's colorful casino moguls. The Nevada Gaming Control Board on Wednesday recommended that Buffett's company, Margaritaville Holdings, be granted a gambling license, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported . That would allow the company to share in the revenue of the Flamingo hotel's Margaritaville casino, which has 220 slot machines and a bar called -- what else?
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
After a year of singing the blues in 2010, concert and ticketing giant Live Nation Entertainment Inc. had cause for a modest celebration, posting a 6% uptick in revenue and narrower losses in 2011 despite a tough global economy. Propelled by strong sales of concerts from Jimmy Buffett, Van Halen, Roger Waters and others, the Beverly Hills company on Thursday said sales for the year that ended Dec. 31 were $5.38 billion, compared with $5.06 billion in 2010. Meanwhile, its net loss narrowed to $83 million for 2011, from $228.4 million in 2010, as Live Nation de-emphasized its less profitable amphitheater concert venues and focused on its higher-margin arena events.
TRAVEL
July 18, 2010 | By Millie Ball, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Hey, got any extra Jimmy Buffett tickets?" The two 50ish retirees, both wearing sunglasses and hoop earrings, laughed as they tried to get passersby to stop and chat awhile, a Southerner's favorite pastime on sleepy summer days. And on this overcast afternoon, with a cooling breeze from the Gulf of Mexico, there was plenty to talk about. "It's usually bumper-to-bumper traffic this time of year," said Bunny Munoz, a lifelong resident of the Alabama coast. Her friend Rita Kruger motioned me to join them on a weather-worn bench on the boardwalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2010
James Patterson's publishing company says that he's the first author to exceed 1 million sales in electronic book delivery. The Hachette Book Group says Patterson has moved 1.14 million units of his books for devices like Kindle and the iPad. The big seller, by far, is the most recent: Patterson's novel "I, Alex Cross," which was published both electronically and in hardcover last fall. Since his first novel in 1976, Patterson's books have sold more than 205 million copies. There's no third-party monitor of e-book sales, so Hachette used its own figures and checked other prominent authors.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2008 | associated press
It's like the world's biggest beach party, hosted by the world's richest beach bum. The 15,000 fans packing the sold-out MGM Grand arena were enjoying the final concert of the season by Jimmy Buffett, the singer whose popularity and fortune grow greater even as his hair grows grayer. Buffett, who turned 62 on Christmas Day, long ago became an icon of certain baby boomers by offering the dream of dropping their responsibilities for his tropical party vibe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2005 | From a staff writer
A Secret Service agent was dispatched to recover Jimmy Buffett's lost cellphone, which reportedly contained numbers for Bill Clinton, Al Gore and Jimmy Carter. The singer lost the phone at a Cuban restaurant in Delray Beach, Fla., on May 29, according to the Palm Beach Post. Busboy Jason Martin picked it up. "We were sitting around smoking weed and strolling down the list on Jimmy's phone, going 'Wow!' " Martin told the paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996
"How many times can Buffett make the same album?" asks Steve Hochman in last Sunday's Record Rack. In reply I ask, "How many times can the Los Angeles Times and its Robert Hilburn clones write the same review for Jimmy Buffett?" Having heard the new CD "Banana Wind" several times, I beg to differ with Hochman. If Jimmy Buffett's music is so bad, then why does he continue to be one of the biggest if not the biggest concert act year after year? The sound that Jimmy makes is for the masses who want a little peace in their lives and a dream to follow as well as to attain a sense of fun and a view of the world that has some hope.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1997 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How much is a Cheeseburger in Paradise worth? Singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett and two Orange-based restaurant operators are squaring off in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to find out. The longtime performer known for his laid-back, Key West point of view has sued Edna Bayliff and Laren Gartner, alleging that they illegally used the title of his 1978 hit single "Cheeseburger in Paradise" for the name of a popular eatery and bar on Maui that opened in 1989.
BOOKS
November 21, 2004 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
You want likable fiction? Well, likability is Jimmy Buffett's stock in trade. Think of the refrain to his most famous song, "Margaritaville." The hung-over expatriate "wastin' away" on a tropical beach refuses to blame a woman for his plight. What a good sport he is, we think. And when, in the last verse, he admits that "it's my own damn fault," do we blame him for having made us assume all along that a woman had, in fact, done him wrong? No, we give him style points for honesty.
NEWS
July 22, 2004 | Robert Hilburn
In an era of teen pop and youthful hip-hop, the last person you'd expect to see at the top of the charts is a good-timin' ol' boy such as Jimmy Buffett. But the king of the parrot- heads' new album, "License to Chill," entered the national album sales chart Wednesday at No. 1 after selling 239,000 copies in its first week in the stores, reports Nielsen SoundScan. The CD -- the first No.
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