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Jimmy Carter

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1996 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. E-mail: rscheer@aol.com
Jimmy Carter called me the other day to clear up the confusion in his mind about the lust in his heart. Actually he was returning my call, since I had taken umbrage over the treatment in his current book "Living Faith," of the Playboy interview I did with him during his 1976 presidential campaign. Although he refers in his book to the hullabaloo over the interview as "one of the best-known events in U.S.
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NEWS
November 25, 1998 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
"You are old when regrets take the place of dreams." --Jimmy Carter, "The Virtues of Aging" Former President Carter remembers clearly when reality struck, when he knew he had reached senior citizendom, a state he had until then rejected as only for older folks. He and Rosalynn and friends had ordered identical breakfasts at a cafe in Georgia, but when the bills came, Carter's was less. An honest man, Carter "called the waitress over and said, 'You made a mistake,' " he recalls.
BOOKS
January 3, 1993 | Robert Dallek, Dallek, a specialist in recent American history at UCLA, is the author of, among other books, "Lone Star Rising: Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1908-1960," which is just out in paperback from Oxford University Press.
To most Americans, politics is a dirty business in which operators--usually lawyers, lobbyists and special interests--indulge themselves at public expense. The current affinity for term limits grows out of decades of cynicism about the country's elected officials. There is ample reason for the public's sour mood. Scandals, abuse of voting rights, unrepresentative government dominated by self-serving advocates, all have punctuated our history.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | CAROLYN S. CARLSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jimmy Carter's tight, measured script is in the margins of virtually every memo, report and briefing book that crossed his desk in the White House. Newly opened files at the Carter Presidential Library disclose that Carter, unlike some other modern Presidents, liked to put his thoughts on paper--usually on the paper that prompted the thought. He was a speed reader and preferred memos to meetings so he could deal more efficiently with issues presented to him.
BOOKS
August 14, 1988 | Frank Levering, Levering farms, writes, and tramps the Blue Ridge Mountains in Orchard Gap, Va. and
Having penned the obligatory memoirs of his presidency, as well as weighty books on the Mideast, the "golden years" and the art of negotiation, Jimmy Carter, in "An Outdoor Journal: Adventures and Reflections," turns to the first love of his youth and the refuge of his stormy adult life: the primal world of hunting and fishing. The nation, it must be noted, has not been waiting breathlessly for this event.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
For a moment here Saturday, as he appeared before the most exuberant crowd of the day, Vice President Dan Quayle could reach back into the past and snarl at the ghost of the last Democratic President. "Remember a guy named Jimmy Carter?" he asked supporters gathered at a senior citizens center. "You see what Jimmy Carter and the Democratic Congress did to us in the late 1970s? Weak. Impotent. Lost respect not only here at home, but around the world."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1991 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Division del Norte elementary school here, the just-completed academic year ushered in the arrival of a new group of students-- Los Jimis, as they're known. A bus route was also born, painted signs on windshields proclaiming the destination--the neighborhood known simply as "Jimmy Carter." The year also saw the fulfillment of Mercedes Gomez Arcadia's lifelong ambition--a home for herself, her husband and three children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1992 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Strolling past honky-tonks and honking trucks, sizzling chorizo stands and endless stacks of plastic toys, former President Jimmy Carter took an impromptu walk through Skid Row with Mayor Tom Bradley on Monday afternoon. In town for two days to generate philanthropic support for inner-city projects, Carter spurned his waiting car, turned away from the city's gleaming towers of finance and law, and headed eastward into a bustling community of mostly poor people who cheered and shouted "Jimmy!
BOOKS
December 21, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
It's best to forget that Jimmy Carter's account of the American Revolution in Florida, the Carolinas and his native Georgia is supposed to be a novel. The former president has no more idea of how to write compelling fiction than we do, say, of how to broker peace between Israel and Egypt. Yet he has researched the period deeply and presented his findings with admirable evenhandedness.
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three former presidents, including two Republicans, on Thursday urged the GOP-controlled Congress to ban from U.S. elections all "soft money," the term for vast but unregulated contributions to the political parties. Such donations--made mostly by big business to Republicans and by big labor to Democrats--totaled more than $260 million last year, and they are now at the center of congressional investigations into campaign fund-raising abuses.
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