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Jimmy Cliff

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AUTOS
January 25, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
Another day closer to the Super Bowl brings us another automaker teasing the ads they've paid millions to air. This time it's Volkswagen, the company behind a number of memorable Super Bowl ads, including the adorable "The Force" spot from 2011 in which a mini Darth Vader breathes life into a Passat. For 2013, the message is "Get Happy. " The teaser ad doesn't show any VWs, just Rock and Roll Hall of Fame musician Jimmy Cliff singing "C'mon, Get Happy" in a field. Joining him are various YouTube celebrities known for their decidedly unhappy online tirades or breakdowns.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
Walter Lutz, 41, bopped his head as he weaved in and out of traffic lanes Sunday in Chinatown. His 7-year-old daughter, Scarlette, giggled as she biked behind her father. Bright-colored leis dangled from Lutz's neck, complementing his luminous Hawaiian shirt with sunset and palm trees. The word "CicLAvia" was painted across Lutz's straw hat. "Each year, I try to do something different," Lutz said of participating in the bike festival. "I've walked and skateboarded" before. His cargo bike toted a large music speaker that would be replaced with Scarlette's bike once she tired of riding.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times
After one take of Jimmy Cliff's new song "Blessed Love," producer, fan and lifelong punk rocker Tim Armstrong offered a quick assessment: "I think we got it. " Not entirely. Armstrong, best known as the scratchy-voiced leader of Oakland punk outfit Rancid, looked to the reggae legend for his feeling. "Fine, fine, fine," said Cliff, rocking forward and holding his hands together as if in prayer. Armstrong suggested doing another take. Cliff, at first, seemed indecisive. Armstrong recognized that cue and nodded to his band to get ready for Take 2. "I'm an introverted character," Cliff said about an hour later.
AUTOS
January 25, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
Another day closer to the Super Bowl brings us another automaker teasing the ads they've paid millions to air. This time it's Volkswagen, the company behind a number of memorable Super Bowl ads, including the adorable "The Force" spot from 2011 in which a mini Darth Vader breathes life into a Passat. For 2013, the message is "Get Happy. " The teaser ad doesn't show any VWs, just Rock and Roll Hall of Fame musician Jimmy Cliff singing "C'mon, Get Happy" in a field. Joining him are various YouTube celebrities known for their decidedly unhappy online tirades or breakdowns.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
Jimmy Cliff, headlining the Palace in Los Angeles on Tuesday, found a novel way around his perennial dilemma of dealing with an audience primed to hear the hits from "The Harder They Come." He did sing three tunes from the 1972 movie that made him reggae's first international star, but two of them--"By the Rivers of Babylon" and "Johnny Too Bad"--were Jamaican hits for other artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1987 | CONNIE JOHNSON
With the deaths of Bob Marley and, this year, Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff is now the most recognizable and charismatic figure in reggae. When the curtain rose Sunday night at the Wiltern Theatre, it was to the sight of Cliff, seated on the floor with a set of bongo drums, a coat draped across his thin shoulders as he sang an African-tinged message song about the pursuit of freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmy Cliff still sees himself as an outlaw. Not the sort of gun-toting Robin Hood character he played in the classic 1971 reggae film "The Harder They Come," but one dedicated to spreading hopeful messages at a time when "ragamuffin" raps on sex and violence are the vogue in reggae. "I am still an outlaw in a sense, but I have grown spiritually," says Cliff, who is widely regarded as the greatest living reggae singer. "That character I played, he was rebelling politically.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Colonel Sanders came across even half as nice as Jimmy Cliff, those chickens would be roosting on his outstretched arm--even the arm holding the cleaver. Cliff is so relentlessly upbeat, he could persuade a cat to marry a vacuum cleaner. Compared with Cliff, Mr. Rogers seems like Don Rickles in traction. If a smile is, in fact, Cliff's umbrella, he wouldn't get wet if it rained.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The rebel in me will touch the rebel in you," Jimmy Cliff sang at the Coach House on Monday, and the Jamaican singer's ability to touch and inspire an audience indeed seems only to grow stronger over the years. Cliff first entered a recording studio in 1962, a year before the Rolling Stones cut their first record. But, unlike the moribund, pre-programmed marketing event that Mick Jagger & Co.'
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2010 | By Matea Gold and Randy Lewis
Thank goodness the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame voters relented and allowed Iggy Pop and the Stooges into the club. Without the proto-punk rockers on hand, Monday night's awards dinner at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City would have been a pretty tame affair. This year's class of performer inductees, also including ABBA, the Hollies, Genesis and Jimmy Cliff, proved an exceedingly earnest and genuinely appreciative bunch. And then there was Iggy: "This thing is . . . heavy," Pop said, hefting the statue he'd just been handed, then flipping two middle fingers to the crowd of designer-suited men and cocktail-dressed women looking on. "Well, roll over, Woodstock!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times
After one take of Jimmy Cliff's new song "Blessed Love," producer, fan and lifelong punk rocker Tim Armstrong offered a quick assessment: "I think we got it. " Not entirely. Armstrong, best known as the scratchy-voiced leader of Oakland punk outfit Rancid, looked to the reggae legend for his feeling. "Fine, fine, fine," said Cliff, rocking forward and holding his hands together as if in prayer. Armstrong suggested doing another take. Cliff, at first, seemed indecisive. Armstrong recognized that cue and nodded to his band to get ready for Take 2. "I'm an introverted character," Cliff said about an hour later.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2010 | By Matea Gold and Randy Lewis
Thank goodness the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame voters relented and allowed Iggy Pop and the Stooges into the club. Without the proto-punk rockers on hand, Monday night's awards dinner at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City would have been a pretty tame affair. This year's class of performer inductees, also including ABBA, the Hollies, Genesis and Jimmy Cliff, proved an exceedingly earnest and genuinely appreciative bunch. And then there was Iggy: "This thing is . . . heavy," Pop said, hefting the statue he'd just been handed, then flipping two middle fingers to the crowd of designer-suited men and cocktail-dressed women looking on. "Well, roll over, Woodstock!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003
Honors: Jamaica will award reggae singer Jimmy Cliff with the country's third-highest civic award this year, the Order of Merit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmy Cliff still sees himself as an outlaw. Not the sort of gun-toting Robin Hood character he played in the classic 1971 reggae film "The Harder They Come," but one dedicated to spreading hopeful messages at a time when "ragamuffin" raps on sex and violence are the vogue in reggae. "I am still an outlaw in a sense, but I have grown spiritually," says Cliff, who is widely regarded as the greatest living reggae singer. "That character I played, he was rebelling politically.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1998
In the wrong hands, even sentiments about love and freedom can be meaningless platitudes--it's an easy formula for too many reggae artists. But if veteran singer Jimmy Cliff had few new tricks to offer on Tuesday at the House of Blues, his idealistic preaching was never less than genuine. High-stepping and twirling to the beat in a rust-colored suit, Cliff demonstrated himself to be a still-vibrant survivor from reggae's classic era.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Colonel Sanders came across even half as nice as Jimmy Cliff, those chickens would be roosting on his outstretched arm--even the arm holding the cleaver. Cliff is so relentlessly upbeat, he could persuade a cat to marry a vacuum cleaner. Compared with Cliff, Mr. Rogers seems like Don Rickles in traction. If a smile is, in fact, Cliff's umbrella, he wouldn't get wet if it rained.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003
Honors: Jamaica will award reggae singer Jimmy Cliff with the country's third-highest civic award this year, the Order of Merit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmy Cliff was already a star in Europe and South America by the late '60s, but it was in his starring role in the now cult-classic film "The Harder They Come" in 1972 that introduced him to U.S. audiences. Cliff had been making records in Jamaica since 1962, and the film's tale of a young singer exploited and embittered by the island's corrupt music industry had many parallels to his own life.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The rebel in me will touch the rebel in you," Jimmy Cliff sang at the Coach House on Monday, and the Jamaican singer's ability to touch and inspire an audience indeed seems only to grow stronger over the years. Cliff first entered a recording studio in 1962, a year before the Rolling Stones cut their first record. But, unlike the moribund, pre-programmed marketing event that Mick Jagger & Co.'
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