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Jimmy Espinoza

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991
An article on the "Latino Legends of Rock 'n' Roll" concert tonight ("Midniters' Leader Ready to Rock Again" by Steve Hochman, July 4) misstated my position somewhat. I was responding to a question about Los Lobos member Louis Perez's feelings that packaging a show under a "Latino Legends" banner creates a barrier to progress of Latino artists. While I understand his opinion, I'm completely gratified that this concert is being held and see it as a significant step in representing our cultural heritage as artists of the Latino community.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1991
It's unfortunate that Steve Brigati (" 'Latino Legends' a Celebration of Vibrant Past," Counterpunch, July 8), whose knowledge of music is without question, missed the point I was trying to make in my comments regarding the "Latino Legends of Rock 'n' Roll" show ("Midniters' Leader Ready to Rock Again," Calendar, July 4). In virtually all instances, I support Brigati's sentiments. Many of his points reflect comments I made to Steve Hochman during our interview. The bands involved in the "Legends" show are , without exception, important, talented and great influences.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1991
First of all, I'd like to state that as a professional musician/artist I've always viewed Los Lobos as first-rate artists, musicians and trailblazers. Prior to their commercial hit "La Bamba," they had already been internationally acknowledged as an important new group of artists. Their endeavors to break new artistic ground are second to none. Louis Perez's July 4 comments about the "Latino Legends of Rock 'n' Roll" concert held at the Greek Theatre on July 6 did not disturb me. Perez was supporting more shows like these throughout the year, as opposed to special, one-time only concerts featuring Latino artists on Cinco de Mayo or Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991
An article on the "Latino Legends of Rock 'n' Roll" concert tonight ("Midniters' Leader Ready to Rock Again" by Steve Hochman, July 4) misstated my position somewhat. I was responding to a question about Los Lobos member Louis Perez's feelings that packaging a show under a "Latino Legends" banner creates a barrier to progress of Latino artists. While I understand his opinion, I'm completely gratified that this concert is being held and see it as a significant step in representing our cultural heritage as artists of the Latino community.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Lobos drummer Louis Perez remembers the time in the mid-'60s when he was growing up in East Los Angeles and his older sister dragged him across Whittier Boulevard to hear a few neighborhood rock bands playing in the parking lot of JohnSons Market. And he remembers a couple of years later taking his bike across the street and sitting on the steps of a Catholic church's social hall to hear bands rehearse.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1991 | STEVE BRIGATI, Brigati is a Los Angeles-based music historian and talent coordinator who has helped assemble and promote numerous "legends"-oriented concerts, including "Latino Legends." and
Who is Los Lobos' Louis Perez to criticize Saturday's "Latino Legends of Rock 'n' Roll" concert for holding back "progress" of Latino musicians (Calendar, July 4)? What took place "back then" was "not for the moment" and merely "an important part of musical history." It's about time that some of the great groups of the 1950s and '60s get some major exposure. Thee Midniters, the Blendells and the Champs might well be Los Lobos' musical forebears.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
Because they hailed from the streets of East Los Angeles and enjoyed the support of the local Latin community, Thee Midniters are generally considered the fathers of Chicano rock, paving the way for later bands such as Tierra, El Chicano and Los Lobos. Thee Midniters' classic 1965 debut album, however, reveals no musical traces of Latin America. Its effervescent version of "Land of a Thousand Dances" and its rollicking instrumental (and only real hit) "Whittier Blvd."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2000 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's take a trip down Olympic Boulevard. More than three decades ago, Little Willie G.'s invitation involved Whittier Boulevard, a few main drags to the north. That's when he sang for Thee Midniters, part of a cadre of bands that brought both cultural pride and rock 'n' roll to the Mexican American community of East Los Angeles. And sometimes beyond. "Land of 1000 Dances" made the national singles charts in versions by both Thee Midniters and friendly rivals Cannibal & the Headhunters.
NEWS
November 29, 1993 | GORDON DILLOW and RON RUSSELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a day--and night--for parade lovers to savor Sunday as two familiar Yuletide processions lighted up the streets of Hollywood and the Eastside. The 62nd annual Hollywood Christmas Parade attracted hundreds of thousands of spectators beneath a soon-to-eclipse full moon. Earlier in the day, the 19th annual East L.A. Christmas Fantasy Parade had mixed the brass of marching bands with the brass of mariachis. Organizers estimated that between 750,000 and 1 million people lined the 3.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | SALLI STEVENSONBD Stevenson is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer.
For 20 years, Plaza de La Raza has been an arts and cultural oasis on Los Angeles' Eastside. But it still labors under what its executive director, Gema Sandoval, calls nagging misconceptions. Some think Plaza de La Raza has tons of money. One group of people says it is only interested in Latino culture; conversely, others accuse it of overlooking its Latino heritage. Some think it deals only with traditional arts; others that it focuses too much on contemporary arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Lobos drummer Louis Perez remembers the time in the mid-'60s when he was growing up in East Los Angeles and his older sister dragged him across Whittier Boulevard to hear a few neighborhood rock bands playing in the parking lot of JohnSons Market. And he remembers a couple of years later taking his bike across the street and sitting on the steps of a Catholic church's social hall to hear bands rehearse.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As did the multitudes of World War II veterans and baby boomers who transformed Southern California in decades past, a great influx of Asian and Latino immigrants is leading to epochal shifts in the region's housing market. New studies show that one in every five home buyers in Southern California is foreign-born. That ratio is expected to rise dramatically in the coming years as more immigrants establish themselves and enter prime home-buying age.
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