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Jimmy Garcia

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SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, Gabriel Ruelas kept telling himself, it was all wrong. Jimmy Garcia wasn't supposed to die. He, Ruelas, was the one who was supposed to die young. That's the way it had always been in the dreams. Night after night they would come to him in his restless sleep. The circumstances were different, but the result was always the same. Gabe Ruelas dead before his time. Although he has been a boxer since age 12, he never died in the ring in the dreams. Often it would be in a car accident.
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SPORTS
October 5, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Arturo Gatti, almost out on his feet in the fourth round, stormed back in the fifth to knock down and stop Gabriel Ruelas and retain the IBF junior lightweight championship Saturday night. It was a war, especially in the last two rounds of the scheduled 12-round bout on the Lennox Lewis-Andrew Golota undercard. In another bout, Fernando Vargas of Oxnard stopped Alex Quiroga of Miami at 2:53 of the sixth round.
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SPORTS
May 20, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Super-featherweight Jimmy Garcia of Colombia died Friday morning from brain injuries suffered in a title fight with champion Gabriel Ruelas. Garcia had been in a coma for 13 days after receiving repeated blows to the head in the May 6 bout at Caesars Palace. His life-support systems were shut off at 1:43 a.m. after physicians at University Medical Center in Las Vegas declared him brain dead.
SPORTS
March 14, 1996 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shaking off the lingering effects of having thrown the fatal blows that killed Jimmy Garcia last spring, Gabriel Ruelas won a unanimous 10-round decision over Julio Cesar Herrera at the Olympic Auditorium on Wednesday night before about 3,000. It was a very different Ruelas from the one who lost the World Boxing Council super-featherweight title to Azumah Nelson in December in five rounds. On that night, Ruelas said he saw the ghost of Garcia in the ring.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carmen Garcia couldn't take her eyes off Gabriel Ruelas' hands. As he spoke and gestured, she kept her eyes glued to his fists. It was last Monday, the first formal meeting between the two. Ten days earlier, Ruelas had fought her son, Jimmy, the Colombian junior-lightweight champion. Ruelas had won the bout when it was stopped in the 11th round.
SPORTS
July 29, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are linked by their last name and their profession but nothing more, said Oxnard boxer Robert Garcia of the late Jimmy Garcia, a Colombian junior lightweight who died after suffering head injuries in a May 6 loss to Gabe Ruelas of Sylmar. Robert Garcia sat at ringside and watched as Ruelas hammered Jimmy Garcia for nearly 11 rounds before the fight was stopped. Garcia, 23, collapsed after leaving the ring, immediately underwent surgery and lay in a coma for 13 days before succumbing.
SPORTS
May 12, 1995 | From Associated Press
Injured boxer Jimmy Garcia's condition worsened Thursday, and his doctor said Garcia was in danger of suffering a fatal stroke. Doctors who had been optimistic about Garcia's chances for recovery said the Colombian boxer was unresponsive overnight and his condition became unstable Thursday.
SPORTS
May 8, 1995 | Associated Press
Jimmy Garcia remained in critical but stable condition Sunday after surgery for a large blood clot that formed in his brain following his WBC super-featherweight title bout with Gabriel Ruelas Saturday night at Caesars Palace. Doctors said the Colombian boxer showed slight improvement after the two-hour operation to drain blood from his brain and stop bleeding in a vein, but that it was too early to speculate on his chances of recovery. Garcia was described as "slightly responsive" Sunday.
SPORTS
June 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
Boxer Jimmy Garcia could have survived his fight with Gabriel Ruelas if doctors had a way to tell earlier that he was bleeding in the brain, his neurosurgeon said. Because doctors didn't know of the bleeding, the fight continued to the point where there was a massive shift in Garcia's brain, Al Capanna said. "If we would have known that 20 minutes earlier we could have operated and maybe there would have been no damage," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1995
Jimmy Garcia died of a brain injury this month, 13 days after his title fight with super-featherweight champion Gabriel Ruelas of Sylmar. Because the Colombian was the fourth boxer to die of head injuries in the last 14 months, there has been a renewed chorus of demands that boxing be banned. We have a different perspective: Maybe this lopsided fight should never have taken place.
SPORTS
December 3, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly seven months after the title fight in which his punches caused the death of Jimmy Garcia, Gabriel Ruelas faced Garcia in the ring once again Friday night. Saturday morning, Ruelas offered a possible explanation for the vision he saw of Garcia while Ruelas was losing his World Boxing Council super-featherweight title to Azumah Nelson on a fifth-round knockout.
SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | Jim Murray
In the summer of 1947, when Sugar Ray Robinson fought Cleveland's Jimmy Doyle, he beat him so badly Doyle collapsed and died. Some days later, at the hearing into the death, the district attorney turned to Ray and asked accusingly, "Couldn't you see he was hurt?" Sugar Ray looked at him resentfully. "Sir," he told him, "it's my business to hurt people." It was, unfortunately, too true. The business of boxing is hurting.
SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, Gabriel Ruelas kept telling himself, it was all wrong. Jimmy Garcia wasn't supposed to die. He, Ruelas, was the one who was supposed to die young. That's the way it had always been in the dreams. Night after night they would come to him in his restless sleep. The circumstances were different, but the result was always the same. Gabe Ruelas dead before his time. Although he has been a boxer since age 12, he never died in the ring in the dreams. Often it would be in a car accident.
SPORTS
July 29, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are linked by their last name and their profession but nothing more, said Oxnard boxer Robert Garcia of the late Jimmy Garcia, a Colombian junior lightweight who died after suffering head injuries in a May 6 loss to Gabe Ruelas of Sylmar. Robert Garcia sat at ringside and watched as Ruelas hammered Jimmy Garcia for nearly 11 rounds before the fight was stopped. Garcia, 23, collapsed after leaving the ring, immediately underwent surgery and lay in a coma for 13 days before succumbing.
SPORTS
June 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
Boxer Jimmy Garcia could have survived his fight with Gabriel Ruelas if doctors had a way to tell earlier that he was bleeding in the brain, his neurosurgeon said. Because doctors didn't know of the bleeding, the fight continued to the point where there was a massive shift in Garcia's brain, Al Capanna said. "If we would have known that 20 minutes earlier we could have operated and maybe there would have been no damage," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1995
Jimmy Garcia died of a brain injury this month, 13 days after his title fight with super-featherweight champion Gabriel Ruelas of Sylmar. Because the Colombian was the fourth boxer to die of head injuries in the last 14 months, there has been a renewed chorus of demands that boxing be banned. We have a different perspective: Maybe this lopsided fight should never have taken place.
SPORTS
October 5, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Arturo Gatti, almost out on his feet in the fourth round, stormed back in the fifth to knock down and stop Gabriel Ruelas and retain the IBF junior lightweight championship Saturday night. It was a war, especially in the last two rounds of the scheduled 12-round bout on the Lennox Lewis-Andrew Golota undercard. In another bout, Fernando Vargas of Oxnard stopped Alex Quiroga of Miami at 2:53 of the sixth round.
SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | Jim Murray
In the summer of 1947, when Sugar Ray Robinson fought Cleveland's Jimmy Doyle, he beat him so badly Doyle collapsed and died. Some days later, at the hearing into the death, the district attorney turned to Ray and asked accusingly, "Couldn't you see he was hurt?" Sugar Ray looked at him resentfully. "Sir," he told him, "it's my business to hurt people." It was, unfortunately, too true. The business of boxing is hurting.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carmen Garcia couldn't take her eyes off Gabriel Ruelas' hands. As he spoke and gestured, she kept her eyes glued to his fists. It was last Monday, the first formal meeting between the two. Ten days earlier, Ruelas had fought her son, Jimmy, the Colombian junior-lightweight champion. Ruelas had won the bout when it was stopped in the 11th round.
SPORTS
May 20, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Super-featherweight Jimmy Garcia of Colombia died Friday morning from brain injuries suffered in a title fight with champion Gabriel Ruelas. Garcia had been in a coma for 13 days after receiving repeated blows to the head in the May 6 bout at Caesars Palace. His life-support systems were shut off at 1:43 a.m. after physicians at University Medical Center in Las Vegas declared him brain dead.
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