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Jimmy Heuga

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December 26, 1993 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmie Heuga was about to stop the rental car and beat the tar out of Billy Kidd. It was December of 1962, on an icy road outside Zermatt, Switzerland. Reason? "I didn't like him," Heuga remembers. The two U.S. ski team stars were in the throes of a high-speed romp across Europe. After dropping U.S. Coach Bob Beattie off at the Geneva train station, they thought it would be fun to beat the locomotive to Austria by car if only to see the look on Beattie's face when he stepped off the platform.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2010 | From Times staff and wire reports
Jimmie Heuga, who won a bronze medal skiing at the 1964 Winter Olympics and was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis six years later, has died. He was 66. Heuga died Monday at Boulder Community Hospital in Colorado, said University of Colorado ski coach and longtime friend Richard Rokos. He said Heuga had recently been dealing with respiratory problems. At the '64 Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria, Heuga finished third in the slalom, just behind fellow American Billy Kidd. They were the first U.S. men to win medals in skiing.
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SPORTS
February 9, 1989 | BOB LOCHNER, Times Assistant Sports Editor
Billy Kidd's first reaction was, "Oh no, I didn't win the race." Jimmie Heuga said he took his gloves off and threw them down on the snow in disgust. The date was Feb. 8, 1964, the place Innsbruck, Austria. And moments after their initial disappointment subsided, both men realized that they had just made history, of a sort.
SPORTS
December 26, 1993 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmie Heuga was about to stop the rental car and beat the tar out of Billy Kidd. It was December of 1962, on an icy road outside Zermatt, Switzerland. Reason? "I didn't like him," Heuga remembers. The two U.S. ski team stars were in the throes of a high-speed romp across Europe. After dropping U.S. Coach Bob Beattie off at the Geneva train station, they thought it would be fun to beat the locomotive to Austria by car if only to see the look on Beattie's face when he stepped off the platform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2010 | From Times staff and wire reports
Jimmie Heuga, who won a bronze medal skiing at the 1964 Winter Olympics and was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis six years later, has died. He was 66. Heuga died Monday at Boulder Community Hospital in Colorado, said University of Colorado ski coach and longtime friend Richard Rokos. He said Heuga had recently been dealing with respiratory problems. At the '64 Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria, Heuga finished third in the slalom, just behind fellow American Billy Kidd. They were the first U.S. men to win medals in skiing.
SPORTS
February 8, 1990 | GARR KLUENDER
The disclosure of NHL players' salaries prompted Dave Molinari of the Pittsburgh Press to do some comparative shopping. Molinari's best-buy team: Center: Pierre Turgeon, Buffalo Sabres, $125,000. Right wing: Brett Hull, St. Louis Blues, $125,000. Left wing: Todd Krygier, Hartford Whalers, $110,000. Defense: Glen Wesley, Boston Bruins, $130,000; Paul Cavallini, St. Louis, $135,000. Goalie: Daren Puppa, Buffalo, $130,000. The worst-buy lineup: Center: Bernie Federko, Detroit Red Wings, $335,000.
SPORTS
February 6, 1985 | Bob Lochner
There has been persistent talk lately of holding another Olympics in California as early as 1992. This time, it would be the Winter Games, and although the host city would be Reno, the skiing events would be held at California resorts in the Lake Tahoe basin--including Squaw Valley, Heavenly Valley and Kirkwood. At least, that's what officials of Reno-Tahoe Winter Games told Nevada legislators this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1989
Five years after the Olympic spirit captivated Los Angeles, a new group of Californians has dreams of the five encircled rings in its future, not to mention the prospect of big dollar signs. Lake Tahoe officials from both California and Nevada have joined with the Reno area to bid for the 1998 winter Olympic Games. One of the ski areas involved is Squaw Valley, the site of the 1960 games in which the United States won the ice hockey gold medal and skiers Billy Kidd and Jimmy Heuga made stunning medal-winning runs.
HEALTH
December 8, 1997 | ROSA SALTER, THE MORNING CALL
Keith Nash has just gone from doing reps on a leg-press machine to a weight bench, where he's now in the middle of a set of biceps curls with a pair of 15-pound dumbbells. At 5-foot-8 and 155 pounds, he looks trim and wiry, and he happily reports he's lost 10 pounds since he started working out in May.
SPORTS
March 13, 1991 | BOB LOCHNER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
From out of the past they skied, blending into a montage of Winter Olympics in the modern era. The names were familiar, at least to anyone born before 1960: Franz Klammer, Cindy Nelson, Pepi Stiegler, Nancy Greene, Steve Podborski, Kiki Cutter, Anderl Molterer. And, for those in the post-modern era, there was Billy Johnson, now an official, certified Legend.
SPORTS
February 9, 1989 | BOB LOCHNER, Times Assistant Sports Editor
Billy Kidd's first reaction was, "Oh no, I didn't win the race." Jimmie Heuga said he took his gloves off and threw them down on the snow in disgust. The date was Feb. 8, 1964, the place Innsbruck, Austria. And moments after their initial disappointment subsided, both men realized that they had just made history, of a sort.
SPORTS
March 31, 1993 | ALLAN MALAMUD
If the transfer of the Atlanta Braves and Cincinnati Reds to the National League East and the Chicago Cubs and the St. Louis Cardinals to the West had been approved, the Dodgers might be legitimate candidates to go from worst to first in their division. . . . Reports out of Vero Beach indicate that they are no threat to repeat as 99-game losers. . . . Jody Reed, Tim Wallach and even Jose Offerman are putting the "field" back into the infield.
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