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Jimmy Hoffa

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Every man has his price. What's yours? --Jimmy Hoffa If Danny DeVito were a rubber band, he'd be ready to snap. For two days, the director has been trying to shoot a complicated sequence in "Hoffa," which stars Jack Nicholson as Jimmy Hoffa, dark prince of the American labor movement. Nothing is going right. The sound is garbled. Extras knock over chairs. A flock of pigeons flies across the sound stage's cavernous rafters, making a racket.
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NATIONAL
June 19, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The FBI on Wednesday closed its latest search for the remains of former Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa, ending a dig in a rural field near Detroit where investigators failed to find a trace of the man who has been missing for almost 40 years. The latest effort to locate some trace of Hoffa officially ended Wednesday morning, according to Robert Foley, head of the FBI office in Detroit. He made the announcement hours after officials had resumed digging in the field in Oakland Township, the Detroit area where the union boss had his power base and was last seen.
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NATIONAL
June 17, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Jimmy Hoffa, arguably America's missingest man, gets another dig. Federal investigators, armed with shovels and a warrant, swarmed a field in Oakland Township outside Detroit on Monday in search of the body of the former Teamsters boss after yet another tip in the decades-long investigation. And again, officials are optimistic that, this time, they'll find him. On July 30, 1975, Hoffa, a famed union leader with mob ties, left the Machus Red Fox restaurant in Bloomfield Township, Mich., and was never seen again.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Imagine if the diggers really do find Jimmy Hoffa. That's a mental leap some Michigan residents are not quite ready to make, as the Federal Bureau of Investigation goes back to digging on the second day of its search for former Teamsters boss Hoffa, who became labor's version of Amelia Earhart when he disappeared in 1975. "You're not finding him," one resident tweeted a video of himself saying, as the latest dig site at an Oakland Township field north of Detroit has attracted an array of onlookers and TV crews checking out the search.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Jimmy Hoffa never drove a truck for a living but he turned the Teamsters into the largest and strongest union of its day. He trafficked with thugs but used a sophisticated grasp of the intricacies of trucking industry economics to consolidate his gains. A devoted family man who never developed champagne tastes, he disappeared on July 30, 1975, probably a victim of organized crime. He was a complex, contradictory personality whose life might have made an exceptional movie. It hasn't quite.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Jimmy Hoffa -- the legendary labor leader -- is still missing, authorities said Tuesday after tests failed to detect any human remains in a sample dug up from a suburban Detroit driveway. The negative results mean that Hoffa's final resting place still ranks with such notable mysteries as the whereabouts of aviator Amelia Earhart and the disappearance of Judge Joseph Force Crater . All have become fodder for theorists seeking to resolve unexplained endings. Scientists at Michigan State University recently tested two samples cored from the ground beneath a driveway in Roseville, Mich., as part of an investigation prompted by a tip from an unidentified man who said he thought he saw a body being buried beneath a driveway years ago. The tests came back negative, according to police.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Michigan officials went to a driveway in suburban Detroit this week in the latest search for the remains of dead Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa, but found no body at the home. On Friday, officials drilled out core samples of the earth beneath the concrete to send to Michigan State University for testing of human remains. The results could be available next week. “We'll have to wait for the test results back from Michigan State,” Roseville Police Chief James Berlin told a crowd of reporters from major television and cable networks.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The FBI on Wednesday closed its latest search for the remains of former Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa, ending a dig in a rural field near Detroit where investigators failed to find a trace of the man who has been missing for almost 40 years. The latest effort to locate some trace of Hoffa officially ended Wednesday morning, according to Robert Foley, head of the FBI office in Detroit. He made the announcement hours after officials had resumed digging in the field in Oakland Township, the Detroit area where the union boss had his power base and was last seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In 1957, Jimmy Hoffa was acquitted of charges of bribing a government official, largely due to the efforts of criminal lawyer Edward Bennett Williams. After the trial, Hoffa left the courtroom without a word of thanks. When Williams complained of Hoffa's ingratitude to Frank Costello, another client, the Mafia don replied: "I told you Hoffa was no gentleman." A tough guy among tough guys, Jimmy Hoffa was America's blue-collar samurai warrior.
NEWS
September 8, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One of the 20th century's leading advances in forensic science has suddenly added tantalizing new evidence to one of its great unsolved mysteries: the 1975 disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa. Using DNA testing, the FBI has established a match between known samples of Hoffa's hair and strands of human hair found here more than 25 years ago in a car that police believe was used to abduct the former Teamsters president and carry him to his death.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Jimmy Hoffa, arguably America's missingest man, gets another dig. Federal investigators, armed with shovels and a warrant, swarmed a field in Oakland Township outside Detroit on Monday in search of the body of the former Teamsters boss after yet another tip in the decades-long investigation. And again, officials are optimistic that, this time, they'll find him. On July 30, 1975, Hoffa, a famed union leader with mob ties, left the Machus Red Fox restaurant in Bloomfield Township, Mich., and was never seen again.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Jimmy Hoffa -- the legendary labor leader -- is still missing, authorities said Tuesday after tests failed to detect any human remains in a sample dug up from a suburban Detroit driveway. The negative results mean that Hoffa's final resting place still ranks with such notable mysteries as the whereabouts of aviator Amelia Earhart and the disappearance of Judge Joseph Force Crater . All have become fodder for theorists seeking to resolve unexplained endings. Scientists at Michigan State University recently tested two samples cored from the ground beneath a driveway in Roseville, Mich., as part of an investigation prompted by a tip from an unidentified man who said he thought he saw a body being buried beneath a driveway years ago. The tests came back negative, according to police.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Michigan officials went to a driveway in suburban Detroit this week in the latest search for the remains of dead Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa, but found no body at the home. On Friday, officials drilled out core samples of the earth beneath the concrete to send to Michigan State University for testing of human remains. The results could be available next week. “We'll have to wait for the test results back from Michigan State,” Roseville Police Chief James Berlin told a crowd of reporters from major television and cable networks.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
This post has been corrected. See the note below. The announcement this week that Playboy is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Playboy Interview with a 50-interviews-in-50-days e-book series  sent me back to my bookshelves, where I've kept a copy G. Barry Golson's “The Playboy Interview” for 30 years. Golson's book, which I bought in college, collected the most prominent interviews of Playboy's first two decades, including in-depth conversations with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Jimmy Hoffa, Miles Davis, The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and Jimmy Carter, who during the 1976 presidential campaign famously admitted that he had “committed adultery in my heart.” All these interviews (with the exception of Hoffa and Malcolm X, and you have to wonder why they're missing)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2010 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
James F. Neal, a formidable lawyer who won noteworthy victories on both sides of the courtroom — as a prosecutor he sent Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa and top Watergate figures to prison, and as a defense attorney he saved film director John Landis and Ford Motor Co. from serious criminal charges — died Thursday at a Nashville hospital. He was 81. The cause was esophageal cancer, said his longtime law partner, Aubrey B. Harwell. Neal's reputation for tenacity and brilliance in the courtroom began with the 1964 prosecution of Hoffa, who had successfully fended off two dozen indictments until Neal, a stocky, cigar-chomping ex-Marine with a Tennessee drawl, was assigned to his case.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2009 | Richard Verrier
David Carbonara has a gig many of his peers would covet: He writes music for the critically acclaimed AMC show "Mad Men." A former jazz trombonist, Carbonara loves his job and is grateful for the work. Yet even after he labors on 13 episodes for a full year, he says he won't earn enough to support his family. A one-hour basic cable TV show like "Mad Men" pays $7,000 to $13,000 an episode, but at least half of that goes toward hiring musicians, paying for studio time, copying music and other costs that composers like Carbonara increasingly absorb as studios look to lower their expenses.
NEWS
May 21, 1990
William E. Bufalino Sr., 72, a longtime attorney for the Teamsters Union and its vanished ex-president, Jimmy Hoffa. Bufalino represented Hoffa, the Teamsters or both in seven trials and won five of them. The attorney ended his lengthy relationship with Hoffa in 1971, four years before the labor leader disappeared. Bufalino served 21 years as president of Teamsters Local 985. He testified before two Senate committees that investigated links between labor and organized crime in the 1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmy Hoffa can rest easy, wherever he is. Comparing a union official with the former Teamsters leader does not constitute slander, according to a ruling Friday by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The ruling came in a long-running feud in Westminster. It began with a political squabble during the 1992 municipal elections and led to the dismantling of the Westminster Fire Department amid public accusations of fraud and theft by firefighters and union officials.
OPINION
October 5, 2009
Re "After the Pax," Opinion, Sept. 29 Though I admire the work of Christopher Layne and Benjamin Schwarz, I don't altogether agree with them. Pax Americana unquestionably fathered economic globalism, but the child has dwarfed its papa. There will be instances of old-fashioned nationalism -- as in the throwback worldview of Vladimir Putin -- but money will outwit them every time. With the rise of sovereign wealth funds and the unstoppable growth of nonstate international corporations, both of which drive globalism, I strongly doubt that we are destined to return to a world divided into "spheres of influence."
OPINION
May 26, 2006
I had the craziest dream last night -- the FBI agents digging at the farm outside Detroit revealed the grave of Mary Magdalene, thus leading to worldwide speculation that Jimmy Hoffa's remains would be found underneath the Louvre. DONALD BENTLEY La Puente
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