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Jimmy K Shin

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BUSINESS
June 17, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
When Northrop sought to hire a consultant in 1983 with influential connections in the South Korean government and a shrewd understanding of international arms trading, it went to Jimmy K. Shin. Shin, known in Honolulu as a gregarious and high-stakes operator who drives a Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, was put on the Northrop payroll for $102,000 per year to help sell the company's F-20 jet fighter to South Korea. But Shin, a former bar owner with a checkered past, was not the U.S.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
Aerospace contractor Northrop Corp. is suing Honolulu businessman James Shin to recover $6.25 million allegedly paid to him and several South Korean associates. According to the suit filed Friday in U.S. District Court here, the money paid from 1984 to 1986 was to assist "Northrop's business activities in Korea."
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NEWS
June 30, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Northrop Chairman Thomas V. Jones, two other executives and the company itself are the subjects of a criminal investigation into payments made to Korean firms as part of the company's unsuccessful effort to sell its F-20 fighter jet, according to a reliable source. The three men were ordered to testify before a federal grand jury in Los Angeles and the company was ordered to produce documents related to its Korean deals, Northrop disclosed Wednesday.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Justice Department investigators looking into the legality of $7.75 million in foreign payments that Northrop made to South Koreans in 1984 are examining whether some Northrop officials may have eventually received some of the money, according to knowledgeable sources. In an apparently related development, the Internal Revenue Service has begun its own probe of Northrop's payments to the Koreans, apparently to determine whether American recipients of the funds properly reported the income.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Justice Department investigators looking into the legality of $7.75 million in foreign payments that Northrop made to South Koreans in 1984 are examining whether some Northrop officials may have eventually received some of the money, according to knowledgeable sources. In an apparently related development, the Internal Revenue Service has begun its own probe of Northrop's payments to the Koreans, apparently to determine whether American recipients of the funds properly reported the income.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
Aerospace contractor Northrop Corp. is suing Honolulu businessman James Shin to recover $6.25 million allegedly paid to him and several South Korean associates. According to the suit filed Friday in U.S. District Court here, the money paid from 1984 to 1986 was to assist "Northrop's business activities in Korea."
BUSINESS
July 18, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning legal setback for Northrop, a South Korean arbitrator has rejected the company's claim that it was the innocent victim of fraud when it paid $6.25 million to a Korean power broker in an effort to sell jet fighters to that nation's air force.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Northrop Chairman Thomas V. Jones, two other executives and the company itself are the subjects of a criminal investigation into payments made to Korean firms as part of the company's unsuccessful effort to sell its F-20 fighter jet, according to a reliable source. The three men were ordered to testify before a federal grand jury in Los Angeles and the company was ordered to produce documents related to its Korean deals, Northrop disclosed Wednesday.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
When Northrop sought to hire a consultant in 1983 with influential connections in the South Korean government and a shrewd understanding of international arms trading, it went to Jimmy K. Shin. Shin, known in Honolulu as a gregarious and high-stakes operator who drives a Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, was put on the Northrop payroll for $102,000 per year to help sell the company's F-20 jet fighter to South Korea. But Shin, a former bar owner with a checkered past, was not the U.S.
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