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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
What would you do if seven miles of city streets stretched out before you and there wasn't a car in sight? Hop on your bicycle? Drop into a yoga pose? Samba? Salsa? Sing? These are the sorts of choices Angelenos will have Sunday, when the city boots vehicles from several major thoroughfares and urges its citizens to come out and play. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., portions of a dozen streets will be closed to car traffic on a zigzagging route that extends from East Hollywood through Westlake and into downtown and Boyle Heights.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
What would you do if seven miles of city streets stretched out before you and there wasn't a car in sight? Hop on your bicycle? Drop into a yoga pose? Samba? Salsa? Sing? These are the sorts of choices Angelenos will have Sunday, when the city boots vehicles from several major thoroughfares and urges its citizens to come out and play. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., portions of a dozen streets will be closed to car traffic on a zigzagging route that extends from East Hollywood through Westlake and into downtown and Boyle Heights.
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MAGAZINE
November 2, 2003 | ANDREW JOHN IGNATIUS VONTZ
If Jimmy Lizama had his way, the fossil-fuel-burning monsters clogging our streets would be relegated to the junkyard while Angelenos savor the city's beauty and climate on bicycles. "I want to help working-class people who want to go to the market on their bikes instead of driving 10 miles to go to a store," says the proprietor of Kill Your Car Courier service and a founding member of the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition advocacy group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2005 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
There were at least 500 of them, wearing angel wings, rubber tentacles, Girl Scout uniforms and other costumes. But in a city where freakish exhibitionism is as about as original as saying you're working on a screenplay, the more startling sight was seeing everyone pedaling a bicycle. The cyclists commandeered three westbound lanes on Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake late Friday night, forming a convoy a quarter-mile long.
MAGAZINE
October 2, 2005 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer.
It's like riding a bicycle, once you learn you never forget . . . As with other handy adages, this one will get you from here to there for a good long while. Then one day you come across something new that also happens to be something quite old. And you find yourself starting over again.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
The Bicycle Kitchen occupies, yes, a kitchen. It overfills the remainder of a studio apartment too. Inside the air smells vaguely of perspiration, mixed with the mechanical scent of bicycle grease and the talc-rubber aroma of inner tubes. People are cooking here, but not dinner. Their conversations drown out music from a boombox. It is impossible to not be in the way. Described figuratively instead of literally, the Bicycle Kitchen encompasses quite a bit more than these busy, cheerful rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2009 | Nick Owchar; Orli Low; Carolyn Kellogg
'Shadow and substance' What's the first thing you think about when you hear the words "The Twilight Zone"? Is it a man in a black suit with a cigarette? Or that cool, lawyerly voice: "Submitted, for your perusal: a Kanamit. Height: a little over 9 feet. Weight: in the neighborhood of 350 pounds. Origin: unknown . . ."? Rod Serling brought something new to television when the first episode of "The Twilight Zone" aired in October 1959. Some publishers have already celebrated the show's 50th anniversary: Douglas Brode's "Rod Serling and the Twilight Zone: The 50th Anniversary Tribute" (Barricade Books)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2004 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
"It's better than a video game! It's better than a movie!" Ben Guzman's eyes widen. Sure they do. He stands a half-inch taller just thinking about Southern California's most daring thrill ride -- propelling a spindly, stripped-down bicycle straight into the fury of big city traffic. Guzman's friend ponders the remark, and shakes his head. "No," says Jimmy Lizama, flashing a ferocious grin. "It is the movie." Traffic got you down?
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