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September 15, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Jimmy Lyons, president, general manager and chief honcho of the Monterey Jazz Festival, is on to a good thing. For 15 years, the festival, which opens its 32nd season tonight in an idyllic setting at the Monterey County Fairgrounds, has sold out all five of its Friday-Sunday, 7,000-seat concerts--and usually in advance. And this without the more popular jazz/fusion artists like Kenny G, Spyro Gyra or Lee Ritenour. In two words, Monterey is not trendy.
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April 11, 1994 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James L. (Jimmy) Lyons, founder of the legendary Monterey Jazz Festival and its manager from 1958 until his retirement in 1992, died Sunday in San Luis Obispo. He was 78. Lyons suffered a heart attack and died at Sierra Vista Hospital, according to jazz festival spokesman Paul Fingerote. The son of a Presbyterian missionary, Lyons was born in China in 1916. His family moved to Cleveland in 1922 and later settled in California.
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NEWS
April 11, 1994 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James L. (Jimmy) Lyons, founder of the legendary Monterey Jazz Festival and its manager from 1958 until his retirement in 1992, died Sunday in San Luis Obispo. He was 78. Lyons suffered a heart attack and died at Sierra Vista Hospital, according to jazz festival spokesman Paul Fingerote. The son of a Presbyterian missionary, Lyons was born in China in 1916. His family moved to Cleveland in 1922 and later settled in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Jimmy Lyons, president, general manager and chief honcho of the Monterey Jazz Festival, is on to a good thing. For 15 years, the festival, which opens its 32nd season tonight in an idyllic setting at the Monterey County Fairgrounds, has sold out all five of its Friday-Sunday, 7,000-seat concerts--and usually in advance. And this without the more popular jazz/fusion artists like Kenny G, Spyro Gyra or Lee Ritenour. In two words, Monterey is not trendy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"A Singer's Singer." Mabel Mercer. V.I.E.W. $39.95. The British-born singer, born in 1900, became a Paris favorite in the 1930s and the toast of New York's East Side starting in the '40s. Revered by her countless fans, she offers here a cross section of songs, most of them fairly obscure, in her almost parlando style. For many, an obvious feeling for lyrics compensated for her lack of technical skill.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Mundell Lowe, the guitarist and composer who for the last three years has been musical director of the Monterey Jazz Festival, has resigned. Lowe said Tuesday that he will be musical director for a festival in Del Mar, to be produced in the spring of 1988 by Jack Wheaton, and that he will begin work soon on seeking talent for the event. "I will have complete artistic control over what happens there," Lowe said. "I never did have that at Monterey."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the high points of next weekend's Monterey Jazz Festival, America's oldest and most highly regarded jazz event, has always been the presentation of new jazz compositions. In the early years, legendary artists such as Duke Ellington, Jon Hendricks, John Lewis, J.J. Johnson and Dave Brubeck debuted impressive, newly composed works.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The biggest West Coast jazz weekend of the fall season kicks off next Friday with the start of the 39th Monterey Jazz Festival--a colorful, three-day, virtually nonstop celebration of the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It'll take a bit of doing to make all the stops--a private helicopter would help--but there's enough jazz festival action taking place over the next week to satisfy the most avid fans. Tonight, for example, the Monterey Jazz Festival (presented by MCI WorldCom) kicks off its 42nd installment, one of the world's longest-running uninterrupted series of jazz concerts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1987 | DON SNOWDEN
"Great musicians are more than musicians--they are poets and spiritual forces," said pianist Cecil Taylor. "It is the sensitivity and the concept of the person playing that is most important to me. "I'm not interested in the music or the instruments, per se, but what kind of poetic vision are you attempting to attain? Musicians are many but people who change the urgency, the size of the music as we know it, are few."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sprawling events like the Monterey Jazz Festival often achieve their special qualities via unexpected, star-quality turns by lesser-known artists. And this year's 41st installment of the festival--which is considered by many to be America's premier jazz event--had plenty of sterling performances by performers with little, if any, national visibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Grazing was the order of the day Friday and Saturday at the 41st annual Monterey Jazz Festival. Grazing for food in the festival's multitude of eating places, and grazing for music among the programs taking place simultaneously in six different venues. Toward that end, the colorful food court area was positioned in a long pathway connecting the principal performance arena, the Jimmy Lyons Stage, with the smaller concert locations.
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