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Jimmy Maslon

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2001 | Elaine Dutka
POP/ROCK Politics and Performing at Latin Grammys Singer Gloria Estefan and her producer-husband Emilio say they will not be attending the Latin Grammy Awards now that the show has been moved from their hometown of Miami to Los Angeles. The move was triggered by organizers' security concerns in the face of expected anti-Castro protests against Cuban artists. But Jimmy Smits and Christina Aguilera will be there: They were announced Tuesday as co-hosts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2001 | Elaine Dutka
POP/ROCK Politics and Performing at Latin Grammys Singer Gloria Estefan and her producer-husband Emilio say they will not be attending the Latin Grammy Awards now that the show has been moved from their hometown of Miami to Los Angeles. The move was triggered by organizers' security concerns in the face of expected anti-Castro protests against Cuban artists. But Jimmy Smits and Christina Aguilera will be there: They were announced Tuesday as co-hosts.
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NEWS
May 12, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the ironies of life in subtropical South Florida is that while other major U.S. cities have taken part in a virtual worldwide mania for Latin music by playing host to some of Cuba's top singers and bands, this most Cuban of American cities has not. It's not that Miamians are immune to salsa fever. Dance clubs are packed, and performers such as Celia Cruz draw large, hip-shaking crowds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the absence of qualifying releases from many of the world's best-known Latino superstars, the second annual Latin Grammy nominations turned the spotlight Tuesday on an array of lesser-known, though not less acclaimed performers from Spain, Portugal and Latin America.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, Ernesto Lechner is a regular contributor to Calendar
Think of Latin music in 2000 and a chorus of female voices is likely to flood your mind. From the silky boleros of Omara Portuondo and the rock poetry of Julieta Venegas to the electronica-tinged bossa nova of Bebel Gilberto and the bittersweet pop of Ana Torroja, the past year saw women releasing the most compelling albums in the Latin field. And this trend might well continue in the months to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2006 | Randy Lewis;Robert Lloyd; Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Running short on inspiration for gifts as the 11th hour of holiday shopping approaches? Consider these ideas for noteworthy DVDs that might have escaped your attention. Pop Music Pop music DVDs are as plentiful and varied as the far-reaching field they spring from. Here are several spotlighting fallen heroes, one showcasing a tragically underappreciated band and one celebrating an inspired transatlantic pairing. "Hot as a Pistol, Keen as a Blade" (Hip-O, $19.98).
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Organizers of the Latin Grammy Awards said Monday they will shift this year's event, originally scheduled to occur here in three weeks, to the Los Angeles area because of fears that protests by anti-communist Cuban exiles might turn violent. C.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, Agustin Gurza is a Times staff writer
Jimmy Maslon was raised a Minnesota country boy who didn't speak a speck of Spanish and barely heard a serious lick of Latin music until a few years ago. Today, this onetime R&B guitarist and horror-film fan owns the hottest contemporary Cuban music label in the U.S. The quixotic executive lives in Hollywood, thousands of miles and cultural light years from historic Havana, where most of his artists are based.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA, Times Staff Writer
It's been five years since the first U.S.tour by Los Van Van, the vanguard of dance bands in Cuba for three decades. To fans who followed its once-banned music like a cult, the group's arrival on these shores during the winter of 1996-97 felt monumental, like the fall of the Berlin Wall. The legendary group swept through Yanqui territory in a six-city blitz, including New York and Los Angeles, offering performances so electrifying that fans still buzz about them today.
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