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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | David Gritten, David Gritten is a frequent contributor to Calendar
When director Antonia Bird says nervously that she's expecting a phone call from the Pope any day now, she's only half-joking. But then if you make a film like Bird's "Priest," an angry piece of invective directed at the Catholic church's hierarchy, you have to anticipate strong reactions. "I'm sure the Pope has a screening room and will see 'Priest,' " Bird says. "Who knows what he'll say? But as long as he watches it, you know?" She smiles confidently, then mimes a gulp of pure terror.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | David Gritten, David Gritten is a frequent contributor to Calendar
When director Antonia Bird says nervously that she's expecting a phone call from the Pope any day now, she's only half-joking. But then if you make a film like Bird's "Priest," an angry piece of invective directed at the Catholic church's hierarchy, you have to anticipate strong reactions. "I'm sure the Pope has a screening room and will see 'Priest,' " Bird says. "Who knows what he'll say? But as long as he watches it, you know?" She smiles confidently, then mimes a gulp of pure terror.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1995
"Behind the Clergy's Closed Doors" (by David Gritten, March 19) glowingly featured the film "Priest," aptly described by Gritten as "an angry piece of invective directed against the Catholic church's hierarchy." I cannot comment on the film; but what the article alone demonstrated is that bigotry, intolerance and hatred are accepted and even applauded as long as they are aimed in the "right" direction: at the Catholic church. Director Antonia Bird and screenwriter Jimmy McGovern were almost beside themselves with self-righteousness, prejudice and hypocrisy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
To make a movie about a couple whose love for each other is tested by the sudden onset of a crippling illness is to risk being lumped in with the most glib and manipulative of all dramatic genres, the "disease-of-the-week" TV movie. But Michael Winterbottom, who takes that plunge with "Go Now," is anything but a glib filmmaker.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talented comedic actors often are able to transform themselves into dramatic actors of exceptional sensitivity. Jack Lemmon and Tom Hanks are two film clowns who won best actor Oscars for dramas ("Save the Tiger" and "Philadelphia," respectively). Fellow Oscar winner Emma Thompson started out doing sketch comedy and musical theater before starring in the dramatic films "Howards End" and "Remains of the Day." Now Scottish actor Robbie Coltrane is joining their career paths.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
What are we to make of "Priest"? Created for British television, it arrives on American theatrical screens laden with all the plaudits an extensive tour of the world's festivals can bestow on it, from audience awards to standing ovations. And, to a limited extent, it deserves them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's been a decade in the making, premiered a year ago at the Venice and Toronto festivals and concerns itself with events some 70 years in the past. But there is something about Stephen Frears' complex, heartbreaking, beautifully made "Liam" that seems to speak eloquently, painfully to the dilemmas we are facing today, to the terrible price dark times can extort from us all.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Those waxing euphoric about all British television haven't seen much British television. What the Brits do well, however, they do very well. And what they do well (most of the time) are mysteries. Just why U.S. television comes up short in this sphere (anyone voting for that CBS second-rater "Murder, She Wrote" should lay off the New Year's punch) is itself a puzzle. Perhaps at fault is mainstream U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relenting in the face of protests from a Catholic group, a Disney-owned film company agreed Friday to postpone the general release of the controversial movie "Priest" from Good Friday to three days after Easter in much of the nation. The movie, in which priests are depicted as having sex with women and men, was criticized by William A.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2006 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
Point of view is now a lead character on TV. "The Nine," ABC's hottest drama pilot, has no big names, per se; its star is a bank hostage-taking ordeal that, like the plane crash on "Lost," promises to spin out into the future and past. "The Street," an often-gripping miniseries premiering tonight on BBC America and set on a working-class block around Manchester, England, spins out in this fashion too.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Mon Dieu! Good things don't have to end, but frequently do. So PBS says that this will be the final season for Hercule Poirot on "Mystery!" The first-run finale for Agatha Christie's Belgian brain, played with such persnickety elegance by David Suchet, will come in two stages. New Poirot mysteries arrive Oct. 31 and Nov. 14, then come reruns of older Poirots through Christmas.
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