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Jimmy Mclarnin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2004 | Steve Springer, Times Staff Writer
Jimmy "Baby Face" McLarnin, a two-time welterweight boxing champion in an era when each weight division had only one titleholder, has died. He was 96. McLarnin died Oct. 28 at a nursing home in Richland, Wash. The cause of death was not reported. McLarnin, also known as the Belfast Spider, had victories over 21 champions or future titleholders in a career that stretched from 1923 to 1936.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2004 | Steve Springer, Times Staff Writer
Jimmy "Baby Face" McLarnin, a two-time welterweight boxing champion in an era when each weight division had only one titleholder, has died. He was 96. McLarnin died Oct. 28 at a nursing home in Richland, Wash. The cause of death was not reported. McLarnin, also known as the Belfast Spider, had victories over 21 champions or future titleholders in a career that stretched from 1923 to 1936.
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SPORTS
July 29, 1990 | AL STUMP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Standing on first base after singling for the New York Yankees in 1930, 25-year-old Jimmie Reese felt real fear for the first time in a ballpark. "Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig hit in the next spots behind me," he said. "When those lefties pulled shots my way, all I got was a half-second flash of white. Sometimes their drives would clip my shirt-- swish! --before I could begin to duck. It was the only time I've been terrified.
SPORTS
July 29, 1990 | AL STUMP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Standing on first base after singling for the New York Yankees in 1930, 25-year-old Jimmie Reese felt real fear for the first time in a ballpark. "Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig hit in the next spots behind me," he said. "When those lefties pulled shots my way, all I got was a half-second flash of white. Sometimes their drives would clip my shirt-- swish! --before I could begin to duck. It was the only time I've been terrified.
SPORTS
October 7, 1989
It is so wonderful to know that there are still some writers and fans who remember (Baby Face) Jimmy McLarnin, who has not only set an example in the fight game but also in the quality of life after the roar of the crowd is over. CHUCK McMATH, Pico Rivera
SPORTS
December 27, 1987 | Jim Murray
Prizefighters are not supposed to have 80th birthdays. If they do, you'll know they'll celebrate it tucked away in a room some place with bars on the windows and rubber on the walls, hearing bells no one else can hear, throwing punches at foes no one else can see and telling stories about the night they fought the "bombah" in a laryngitic husk no one can understand. Their nose and ears are stuffed from a lifetime of hemorrhaging. Maybe their hand shakes or their voice trembles.
SPORTS
December 26, 1989 | JIM MURRAY
Every year about this time, on his birthday, I have lunch with Jimmy McLarnin, the old prizefight champion. The years have been kind to Jimmy. He's 82, but he hears no bells ringing, sees no flocks going overhead, doesn't spar with telephone poles. He still has the same disingenuous unmarked face with the wide stare that led the sporting press to label him "Baby Face" all those years ago. He's probably within 10 pounds of his fighting weight.
SPORTS
September 26, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
They shared hard times, those tough, rock-hard young men of America's Depression, and they fought one another savagely. Their names alone evoke a richness of the American melting pot and the American dream: Canzoneri, Ross, McLarnin, Petrolle, Apostoli, Zivic . . . and maybe the greatest of them all, Henry Armstrong. They're nearly all gone now, the great welterweights and middleweights of the Depression era.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | TIM KAWAKAMI
Here are some key dates in the life of the Olympic Auditorium, which will reopen Saturday. * 1924: Jack Doyle, with the help of the Los Angeles Olympic committee for the 1932 Games, builds the Olympic Auditorium. Boxing great Jack Dempsey is on hand for the dedication. * Jan. 13, 1925: The first major card is a Jan. 13, 1925, flyweight bout in which Jimmy McLarnin takes a 10-round decision over Fidel LaBarba.
SPORTS
March 29, 1999
The old champion was on his feet, dancing softly across his carpeted living room, flicking out left jabs. This was 1990 and Jimmy McLarnin, the old welterweight champion, was describing to a visitor to his Glendale home how he upset Young Corbett on this date in 1933. Corbett was a Fresno fighter, real name Rafael Capabianca Giordano. Most felt he was too tough for the younger McLarnin. March, 1933: A new Ford V-8 cost $490. Three-bedroom homes in West L.A. were going for $3,200.
SPORTS
December 26, 1989 | JIM MURRAY
Every year about this time, on his birthday, I have lunch with Jimmy McLarnin, the old prizefight champion. The years have been kind to Jimmy. He's 82, but he hears no bells ringing, sees no flocks going overhead, doesn't spar with telephone poles. He still has the same disingenuous unmarked face with the wide stare that led the sporting press to label him "Baby Face" all those years ago. He's probably within 10 pounds of his fighting weight.
SPORTS
October 7, 1989
It is so wonderful to know that there are still some writers and fans who remember (Baby Face) Jimmy McLarnin, who has not only set an example in the fight game but also in the quality of life after the roar of the crowd is over. CHUCK McMATH, Pico Rivera
SPORTS
September 26, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
They shared hard times, those tough, rock-hard young men of America's Depression, and they fought one another savagely. Their names alone evoke a richness of the American melting pot and the American dream: Canzoneri, Ross, McLarnin, Petrolle, Apostoli, Zivic . . . and maybe the greatest of them all, Henry Armstrong. They're nearly all gone now, the great welterweights and middleweights of the Depression era.
SPORTS
December 27, 1987 | Jim Murray
Prizefighters are not supposed to have 80th birthdays. If they do, you'll know they'll celebrate it tucked away in a room some place with bars on the windows and rubber on the walls, hearing bells no one else can hear, throwing punches at foes no one else can see and telling stories about the night they fought the "bombah" in a laryngitic husk no one can understand. Their nose and ears are stuffed from a lifetime of hemorrhaging. Maybe their hand shakes or their voice trembles.
SPORTS
December 19, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
The Los Angeles Xtreme of the XFL introduced its 11-member cheerleading squad Monday at a news conference at the House of Blues in West Hollywood. Contrary to what one might think, all of them are either college graduates or attending college. More than 500 young women tried out for the squad. "We were picked first for our dancing ability, and second because of our personalties and people skills," said Rhonda Kaufman, 22, who graduated from UCLA in June with a degree in sociology.
SPORTS
June 19, 1987 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
In 1924, at the Olympic Games in Paris, two Los Angeles boxers battled for the gold medal in the featherweight division. In a close bout, Jackie Fields scored a decision over Joe Salas, who was awarded the silver medal. Recently, the two old battlers died, within days of one another. Fields died June 3, at 79. On June 11, Salas died, at 83. Fields died in Las Vegas, where he lived in a rest home, and was buried there.
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