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July 3, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT
Jimmy Page, the revered ex-Led Zeppelin guitarist, was standing on the small balcony of a suite in a posh Beverly Hills hotel on a recent afternoon, leaning against a chest-high railing and peering at the ground 14 floors below. The idea of jumping--as an option to being interviewed again--may have crossed his mind. That's how much he hates meeting the press. Page had just finished one interview with MTV, but now was sentenced to another.
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NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Jon Healey
This post has been updated, as indicated below. A belated arrival on the streaming-music scene, Led Zeppelin quickly shot up the charts on Spotify this week despite not having released an album of new material in more than 30 years. The service made the band's first two albums (both from 1969) available Wednesday -- the first Led Zep releases to appear on any of the licensed music subscription services -- and within a day they were both in Spotify's Top 25. [ Updated, 12:15 p.m. Dec. 13: Spotify made two more of the band's releases available Thursday, and all four were in the Top 25 by noon Friday.]
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NEWS
June 7, 2009 | by Nic Harcourt
1. You have a lot going on: You started a label, Third Man Records; you?re in the upcoming It Might Get Loud , a guitar documentary with the Edge and Jimmy Page; and now you?re in the Dead Weather. Are you ever too busy? When art and music are happening, who am I to say, ?I don?t have enough time for this right now?? I would hate to have business get in the way of something beautiful. 2. How would you describe the Dead Weather, as opposed to your other two bands, the White Stripes and the Raconteurs?
SPORTS
August 17, 2013 | By Chris Foster
UCLA Jim Mora wouldn't dare listen to those making predictions now. As a teen in the Seattle area? Well … “Led Zeppelin came to the Kingdome when I was in high school and I had tickets,” Mora said. “Some  Nostradamus person predicted that the decibel level on Jimmy Page's guitar would be so high that the roof would crack. So I didn't go. I never got to see them. It is one of the regrets in my life.” Classic rock was a constant during UCLA's training camp at Cal State San Bernardino.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
When it's nearing midnight and some amazing maniac is shredding through a guitar solo on stage, eyes closed, sweat flying, vibrations rumbling through the house like a northbound freight train, it's easy to forget just how much art and craft and science is involved in creating that sound. Director Davis Guggenheim, who brought us Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth," reminds us of this in his very fine documentary about the electric guitar and the men who play it best, "It Might Get Loud."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Whether they're nuclear physicists, poets or archaeologists, it's always fascinating to put people who practice the same craft together in the same room and get them talking. That's pretty much the concept behind Davis Guggenheim's new film, "It Might Get Loud," which is playing in New York and L.A., then heading to 12 more cities on Labor Day weekend. Instead of interviewing astronauts or molecular biologists, Guggenheim chose three world-class guitarists -- Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White -- who not only play some wonderful music together but ponder their place in the world as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2011 | Richard Cromelin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bert Jansch, a revered, enigmatic Scottish singer-guitarist whose effect on a host of prominent musicians eclipsed his own fame, has died. He was 67. Jansch died Wednesday at a hospital in London of lung cancer, a disease he first battled in 2009, his spokesman Mick Houghton told the Associated Press. Jansch canceled some appearances as the opening act for Neil Young's U.S. concert tour last fall to undergo treatment but rejoined him for some dates earlier this year. Young was just one of the high-profile artists who celebrated Jansch's evocative songs and virtuosic, rough-hewn fingerpicking.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
Led Zeppelin cast such an enormous shadow over rock that it's no wonder guitarist Jimmy Page, the group's founder and chief musical architect, is still trying to move out from under it. By the time the British band called it quits after the death of drummer John Bonham in 1980, Zeppelin stood over even the Rolling Stones as the biggest live draw in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1988
Geffen's John Kalodner says that Jimmy Page doesn't want to come across as "all bull" and wants to create excitement about his forthcoming solo project "without the hype" (Pop Eye, by Patrick Goldstein, Jan. 17). Kalodner then hypes us to death by calling Page "the most famous guitar player in the world"--Eric Clapton and George Harrison easily out-fame him--and "the world's best guitarist," which is easily debatable just in rock--never mind Stanley Jordan, John Williams or Chet Atkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
Jimmy Page hasn't made it up the stairway to heaven, but he's the first to reach the new British Walk of Fame. The former Led Zeppelin guitarist cast his handprints in cement Monday as the first music legend to be featured on London's answer to the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The site of the British version, which will feature popular music giants, is taking shape outside the new Virgin Music superstore on Piccadilly Circus, London's landmark crossroads.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
Looking for an opportunity to hear Led Zeppelin deflect questions -- once again -- about a reunion? Be sure to catch "The Late Show with David Letterman" on Monday night, when Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones will sit down for a joint interview. The classic-rock legends are scheduled to visit Letterman's show (which, FYI, has a separate musical guest booked) the day after being honored at the 35th annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington; the talk-show host is among this year's other honorees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2011 | Richard Cromelin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bert Jansch, a revered, enigmatic Scottish singer-guitarist whose effect on a host of prominent musicians eclipsed his own fame, has died. He was 67. Jansch died Wednesday at a hospital in London of lung cancer, a disease he first battled in 2009, his spokesman Mick Houghton told the Associated Press. Jansch canceled some appearances as the opening act for Neil Young's U.S. concert tour last fall to undergo treatment but rejoined him for some dates earlier this year. Young was just one of the high-profile artists who celebrated Jansch's evocative songs and virtuosic, rough-hewn fingerpicking.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Whether they're nuclear physicists, poets or archaeologists, it's always fascinating to put people who practice the same craft together in the same room and get them talking. That's pretty much the concept behind Davis Guggenheim's new film, "It Might Get Loud," which is playing in New York and L.A., then heading to 12 more cities on Labor Day weekend. Instead of interviewing astronauts or molecular biologists, Guggenheim chose three world-class guitarists -- Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White -- who not only play some wonderful music together but ponder their place in the world as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2009 | Associated Press
Family members, longtime friends and music fans of all ages lined up Friday at a public visitation for Les Paul, the inventor whose creation of the first solid-body electric guitar helped pave the way for rock 'n' roll. Adam Bollinger never got a chance to see Paul play live. But the 15-year-old from Plainfield, Ill., knows how important Paul was to rock 'n' roll. That's why he and his mother, Coleen Bollinger, drove 2 1/2 hours to be among the first in line. "It's just about me paying respects and being here for him," Bollinger said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2009 | Steve Appleford
There's a moment in the documentary "It Might Get Loud" when Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page, while sitting with fellow guitarists Jack White and the Edge, reaches for his Gibson Les Paul to play a thundering "Whole Lotta Love." The solid-body guitar remains the model of choice for Page and many of rock's leading players, and is the enduring legacy of the late guitarist and inventor Les Paul. "It was like a throwdown," director Davis Guggenheim said of that moment in his film. "It was like, 'I'm done talking.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
When it's nearing midnight and some amazing maniac is shredding through a guitar solo on stage, eyes closed, sweat flying, vibrations rumbling through the house like a northbound freight train, it's easy to forget just how much art and craft and science is involved in creating that sound. Director Davis Guggenheim, who brought us Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth," reminds us of this in his very fine documentary about the electric guitar and the men who play it best, "It Might Get Loud."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page said Monday that he was ready to take the legendary band on a world tour after burning up the stage at last month's reunion concert in London. Page, who was in Japan to promote the new Zeppelin release, "Mothership," called the two-hour-plus concert "brilliant" and said it was proof that Led Zeppelin, which formed in 1968, can still perform at its best. He said the band was ready musically to get back together and take it out on a wider run, but it was not clear when it would go on tour because singer Robert Plant is touring with Alison Krauss until September.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Chuck Crisafulli
Calendar's pop staff surveys 40 of the nation's most popular or critically acclaimed albums : . BLACK CROWES, "Amorica," American. Still standing proud in their flare-bottoms, the Crowes offer dated fashions, snotty poses and an engaging, exhilarating celebration of the rock 'n' roll groove. . 1/2 JIMMY PAGE & ROBERT PLANT, "No Quarter," Atlantic. The diversity of the players here encourages Page and Plant to vigorously reinvent several of their Led Zeppelin classics. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2009 | Steve Appleford
Davis Guggenheim calls himself a "Behind the Music" junkie, watching every episode of the VH1 show chronicling famous rock stars' rise and fall and rise again amid triumph and self-destruction. He loves it, he says, but the Academy Award-winning director of "An Inconvenient Truth" had other ideas for his own documentary on the electric guitar.
NEWS
June 7, 2009 | by Nic Harcourt
1. You have a lot going on: You started a label, Third Man Records; you?re in the upcoming It Might Get Loud , a guitar documentary with the Edge and Jimmy Page; and now you?re in the Dead Weather. Are you ever too busy? When art and music are happening, who am I to say, ?I don?t have enough time for this right now?? I would hate to have business get in the way of something beautiful. 2. How would you describe the Dead Weather, as opposed to your other two bands, the White Stripes and the Raconteurs?
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