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Jimmy Ray

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1998 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now, from the same manager who brought the world the Spice Girls, it's . . . Spice Boy? Well, no. English rockabilly phenom Jimmy Ray, unlike the Spice Girls, is not a creation of manager Simon Fuller--and he seems perfectly content with the stage name he has adopted for himself. He repeats it often enough in his debut hit single, "Are You Jimmy Ray?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1998 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now, from the same manager who brought the world the Spice Girls, it's . . . Spice Boy? Well, no. English rockabilly phenom Jimmy Ray, unlike the Spice Girls, is not a creation of manager Simon Fuller--and he seems perfectly content with the stage name he has adopted for himself. He repeats it often enough in his debut hit single, "Are You Jimmy Ray?"
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NEWS
May 25, 1997 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Brown has an indelible image of the last time she saw her son, before he left 28 years ago for Vietnam. Special Forces Staff Sgt. William T. Brown was standing by the front door of their home being grilled by his angry and crying father, who was demanding to know why he had volunteered for a third combat tour. He responded by telling them he felt it was his duty to return. Less than six months later, on Nov. 3, 1969, Brown and two other U.S.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Brown has an indelible image of the last time she saw her son, before he left 28 years ago for Vietnam. Special Forces Staff Sgt. William T. Brown was standing by the front door of their home being grilled by his angry and crying father, who was demanding to know why he had volunteered for a third combat tour. He responded by telling them he felt it was his duty to return. Less than six months later, on Nov. 3, 1969, Brown and two other U.S.
SPORTS
September 27, 1985 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
They strike quicker than a free safety and are more responsible for keeping young people out of organized football than bad knees. Concerned parents have killed countless football careers before they had a chance to get started. Worried about their children's physical ("You're likely to break your neck") and mental ("Football won't get you a job, algebra will") health, they tell their kids no out of love. Jimmy Raye III's parents love him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1991
I thought the Civil War ended a long time ago, but obviously the carpetbaggers of the North are set on forcing their Southern neighbors to swallow North Country's trash problems. Let the rich trash keep their garbage! JIMMY RAY BOUDEEN, Santee
NATIONAL
September 11, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who has spent the last 15 years in prison should be freed because DNA evidence shows he did not rape an 8-year-old girl, state Atty. Gen. Mike McGrath said in Billings. McGrath joined Yellowstone County Atty. Dennis Paxinos in asking a District Court judge to vacate the convictions against Jimmy Ray Bromgard, 33. McGrath said it is the first case in Montana in which DNA evidence showed a person convicted of a crime was innocent.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who spent 15 years in prison for allegedly raping an 8-year-old girl was freed at the urging of prosecutors who said DNA evidence proves his innocence. Jimmy Ray Bromgard, 33, immediately turned and hugged family members in the courtroom. District Judge G. Todd Baugh approved the request by the Yellowstone County attorney and Montana Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1986
One suspect was shot by police and two others were taken into custody after the trio allegedly robbed a Jack in the Box restaurant Saturday night and forced the employees into a cooler, a spokesman for the Chula Vista Police Department said. The three are suspected of committing a string of fast food restaurant holdups in Chula Vista and San Diego, police said. One of the suspects, Charles McCloud, 19, of San Diego, was shot by police as he tried to escape capture just after 8:30 p.m.
NEWS
November 3, 1991
Like many other news organizations, The Times erroneously reports that Wayne Williams of Atlanta was found guilty of killing children. In "Newsmakers" (Oct. 11) you report that Williams was "found guilty of the 1979 to 1981 killings of 30 black children and young adults. . . ." Actually, Williams was never tried for murdering children. He was tried and convicted in 1982 of first-degree murder in the deaths of Nathaniel Cater, 27, and Jimmy Ray Payne, 21. After Williams' trial, authorities closed the cases of 22 more victims (all but four of them children)
SPORTS
September 27, 1985 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
They strike quicker than a free safety and are more responsible for keeping young people out of organized football than bad knees. Concerned parents have killed countless football careers before they had a chance to get started. Worried about their children's physical ("You're likely to break your neck") and mental ("Football won't get you a job, algebra will") health, they tell their kids no out of love. Jimmy Raye III's parents love him.
SPORTS
November 28, 2005 | From the Associated Press
An Atlantic Coast Conference team will play in the Emerald Bowl because the Pacific 10 does not have enough eligible teams to fill the slot. John Swofford, ACC commissioner, and Gary Cavalli, executive director of the bowl game, said Sunday that the league will place one of its teams against Utah in the Dec. 29 game in San Francisco. Cavalli said earlier that he expected an ACC team to play in the bowl, which was supposed to pair a Mountain West Conference team against a Pac-10 opponent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1991
San Diego police were legally justified in shooting to death a burglary suspect last November who grabbed a semiautomatic pistol from one of the officers and fired at another, the district attorney's office said Thursday. Three officers had responded to a burglary call in City Heights and, upon arrival, found Jimmy Ray Reeves sitting in a cardboard box in someone else's back yard. As the officers approached, Reeves ran, and Officer Edward Rosenbloom chased him, finally catching up.
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