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Jimmy Santiago Baca

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NEWS
March 13, 1989
Poet Jimmy Santiago Baca, the mestizo (half Chicano/half "detribalized Apache") who taught himself to read and write while imprisoned and who recently won the American Book Award for poetry for his "Martin & Meditations on the South Valley," will appear today at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. He replaces Russian poet Bella Akmadulina, who had to postpone her appearance because of visa problems, said Alan Mandell, poetry/literary series producer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Why do school kids shy away from poetry? The answer, suggests “Open the Door: How to Excite Young People About Poetry” - a new book from McSweeney's, in conjunction with the Poetry Foundation - is that it's not taught very well. “I've thought about that and sort of reversed it,” William Stafford says here in response to an interviewer's question about when he decided to be a poet. “My question is: 'When did other people give up the idea of being a poet?' You know when we are kids we make up things, we write, and for me the puzzle is not that some people are still writing; the real question is why did the other people stop?
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BOOKS
July 12, 1998
To Others in Prisons I am the broken reed in this deathly organ, I am those mad glazed eyes staring from bars, the silent stone look that knows like other stones the smell of working feet, knows how long and wide a human can spread over centuries, each step, until we now step on dust and rock of prisons.
BOOKS
March 21, 2004 | Mark Rozzo
Faithful Davitt Sigerson Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 216 pp. $23.95 Davitt Sigerson was, at various times, the president, chief executive and chairman of Polydor, Chrysalis and Island records. His first novel has nothing to do with the music industry. Nothing, that is, until you wonder where all the anger comes from. "Faithful," a forceful little head-butt of a book, seethes with rage as it fixates upon betrayal and sex -- lots of sex.
BOOKS
March 21, 2004 | Mark Rozzo
Faithful Davitt Sigerson Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 216 pp. $23.95 Davitt Sigerson was, at various times, the president, chief executive and chairman of Polydor, Chrysalis and Island records. His first novel has nothing to do with the music industry. Nothing, that is, until you wonder where all the anger comes from. "Faithful," a forceful little head-butt of a book, seethes with rage as it fixates upon betrayal and sex -- lots of sex.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Why do school kids shy away from poetry? The answer, suggests “Open the Door: How to Excite Young People About Poetry” - a new book from McSweeney's, in conjunction with the Poetry Foundation - is that it's not taught very well. “I've thought about that and sort of reversed it,” William Stafford says here in response to an interviewer's question about when he decided to be a poet. “My question is: 'When did other people give up the idea of being a poet?' You know when we are kids we make up things, we write, and for me the puzzle is not that some people are still writing; the real question is why did the other people stop?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1991 | GREGG BARRIOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two major-studio films about Chicano street and prison gangs--"American Me," directed by Edward James Olmos, and "Blood In . . . Blood Out," directed by Taylor Hackford--are in production on the streets of Los Angeles. Both feature violent portrayals of young gangsters, random drive-by shootings, lives ruined by drugs and addiction and race riots filmed on location in state prisons.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
As success stories go, it's a grisly one. By his own account, Jimmy Santiago Baca's parents divorced and abandoned him to a grandparent when he was 2. Later, his mother was murdered by her second husband and his father died of alcoholism. By 5, the young mestizo (half Chicano/half "detribalized Apache") was abandoned again, left at a New Mexico orphanage where he stayed until he was 11, running away the night before he was to be transferred to Boy's Town.
NEWS
August 14, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fear of crime, hatred of the counterculture, the sheer number of prisoners taken in the war on drugs--whatever the reasons, America a generation ago abandoned any pretense at enlightened penology. Attempts at rehabilitation gave way to simple punishment. It was a binge from which the nation today is only beginning to awaken.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1992
The Lannan Foundation has announced the list of authors it will present during its spring 1992 season of "Readings and Conversations," which is held at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood. Each event features readings by poets and prose writers, followed by a public conversation with Michael Silverblatt, host of KCRW radio's "Bookworm" program. The scheduled authors are as follows: * Jan. 21, William H. Gass (fiction). * Feb. 11, Jimmy Santiago Baca and George Evans (poetry).
NEWS
August 14, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fear of crime, hatred of the counterculture, the sheer number of prisoners taken in the war on drugs--whatever the reasons, America a generation ago abandoned any pretense at enlightened penology. Attempts at rehabilitation gave way to simple punishment. It was a binge from which the nation today is only beginning to awaken.
BOOKS
July 12, 1998
To Others in Prisons I am the broken reed in this deathly organ, I am those mad glazed eyes staring from bars, the silent stone look that knows like other stones the smell of working feet, knows how long and wide a human can spread over centuries, each step, until we now step on dust and rock of prisons.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1991 | GREGG BARRIOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two major-studio films about Chicano street and prison gangs--"American Me," directed by Edward James Olmos, and "Blood In . . . Blood Out," directed by Taylor Hackford--are in production on the streets of Los Angeles. Both feature violent portrayals of young gangsters, random drive-by shootings, lives ruined by drugs and addiction and race riots filmed on location in state prisons.
NEWS
March 13, 1989
Poet Jimmy Santiago Baca, the mestizo (half Chicano/half "detribalized Apache") who taught himself to read and write while imprisoned and who recently won the American Book Award for poetry for his "Martin & Meditations on the South Valley," will appear today at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. He replaces Russian poet Bella Akmadulina, who had to postpone her appearance because of visa problems, said Alan Mandell, poetry/literary series producer.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
As success stories go, it's a grisly one. By his own account, Jimmy Santiago Baca's parents divorced and abandoned him to a grandparent when he was 2. Later, his mother was murdered by her second husband and his father died of alcoholism. By 5, the young mestizo (half Chicano/half "detribalized Apache") was abandoned again, left at a New Mexico orphanage where he stayed until he was 11, running away the night before he was to be transferred to Boy's Town.
NEWS
May 29, 1988
Winners of the ninth annual American Book Awards will be honored at a ceremony and reception at 7:30 tonight in the Kensington East/West Ballroom of the Sheraton-Anaheim. Sponsor of the awards is the Before Columbus Foundation, a nonprofit, Berkeley-based organization dedicated to encouraging and recognizing cultural diversity in American literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2000
What's happening the next few weeks: * The Taos Talking Pictures Festival runs April 13-16 at the Taos Convention Center, Storyteller Cinemas and the Oo-oonah Art Center. "The Big Kahuna," right, with Kevin Spacey, is the opening night film. Anjelica Huston and Terrence Malick will receive awards. World premieres include "The Last Producer," "Lost Forever," "The Origin of Man" and others. Some free screenings. Others, $5-$8. Passes $175-$500. (505) 751-1605.
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