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Jimmy Shin

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BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a five-year investigation, the Justice Department is dropping its probe into allegations that Northrop Corp. and its key executives bribed South Korean officials in an effort to sell the F-20 jet fighter, according to legal sources and Justice Department correspondence.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a five-year investigation, the Justice Department is dropping its probe into allegations that Northrop Corp. and its key executives bribed South Korean officials in an effort to sell the F-20 jet fighter, according to legal sources and Justice Department correspondence.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
When Northrop sought to hire a consultant in 1983 with influential connections in the South Korean government and a shrewd understanding of international arms trading, it went to Jimmy K. Shin. Shin, known in Honolulu as a gregarious and high-stakes operator who drives a Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, was put on the Northrop payroll for $102,000 per year to help sell the company's F-20 jet fighter to South Korea. But Shin, a former bar owner with a checkered past, was not the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Justice Department investigators looking into the legality of $7.75 million in foreign payments that Northrop made to South Koreans in 1984 are examining whether some Northrop officials may have eventually received some of the money, according to knowledgeable sources. In an apparently related development, the Internal Revenue Service has begun its own probe of Northrop's payments to the Koreans, apparently to determine whether American recipients of the funds properly reported the income.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Two flamboyant former nightclub owners that Northrop hired as consultants to represent it in South Korea spent $90,000 a month in the mid-1980s entertaining South Korean government officials at saloons, hostess bars and Korean-style geisha houses in an effort to sell the firm's F-20 jet fighter. The disclosure, along with many new allegations about Northrop's South Korean business dealings, is contained in a lengthy report by the Washington law firm of Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writers
South Korean authorities Monday arrested a Seoul businessman in connection with $3.5 million he received from Northrop to help sell the F-20 jet fighter, accusing him of criminal violations of the country's foreign exchange laws. The arrest of Lee Min Ha, chairman of a company Northrop hired as its sales agent in South Korea, marks the first formal government charges growing out of the controversial foreign payments that Northrop made between 1984 and 1986.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writers and
A stately, red brick building stands behind a large courtyard in Seoul's posh Oksudong neighborhood, haunted with the secrets of an extraordinary man who juggled the public affairs of the Olympic Games with a clandestine job selling American war planes to South Korea. The building is the Safari Club, owned by the late Park Chong Kyu, former chief body guard to a dictator, shooting enthusiast and prime mover behind the Seoul Olympics.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writers
Northrop Corp. has come under mounting pressure to explain a string of irregularities in a $6.25-million deal in 1984 to build a hotel in South Korea. Although the hotel was never built and Northrop's money is unaccounted for, the company has steadfastly maintained that the hotel was a legitimate venture aimed at gaining good will in South Korea and at helping the country earn foreign exchange to finance purchases of Northrop's F-20 jet fighters.
SPORTS
November 22, 2002
For this week's games as provided by the league: SUNDAY ATLANTA (6-3-1) AT CAROLINA (3-7)--Falcons: DOUBTFUL: DE Travis Hall (foot); DE Brady Smith (hip); LB John Thierry (hip). QUESTIONABLE: C Roberto Garza (foot); WR Shawn Jefferson (foot); LB Mark Simoneau (ankle). PROBABLE: CB Ray Buchanan (groin); TE Alge Crumpler (quadricep); RB T.J. Duckett (ankle). Panthers: OUT: DT Sean Gilbert (hip); LB Lester Towns (foot).
BUSINESS
July 18, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning legal setback for Northrop, a South Korean arbitrator has rejected the company's claim that it was the innocent victim of fraud when it paid $6.25 million to a Korean power broker in an effort to sell jet fighters to that nation's air force.
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