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Jimmy Van Heusen

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NEWS
February 7, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jimmy Van Heusen, a Tin Pan Alley veteran who won four Academy Awards and composed such memorable tunes as "Love and Marriage" and "Swinging on a Star," has died at his desert home, it was announced today. He was 77. Van Heusen died Tuesday night of complications of pneumonia. His death was confirmed today by the Riverside County Coroner's Office. Most Americans can hum at least a few bars of several Van Heusen tunes--"High Hopes," "Call Me Irresponsible" and "All The Way."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Christopher Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Among other things, the new musical "Robin and the 7 Hoods" is a love letter to composer Jimmy Van Heusen. On first glance it might seem an homage to Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack in their heyday, but it's Van Heusen's infectious melodies, found in "Come Fly With Me," "The Tender Trap," "Ain't That a Kick in the Head," "High Hopes" and 15 other tunes, that are the lifeblood of the effort. The show's music supervisor and vocal arranger, John McDaniel, listens to Van Heusen with an admiring ear. "His uptempo songs have a harmonic jazz beat," he said.
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NEWS
February 8, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmy Van Heusen, who took his name from a shirt label and his melodies from a mirthful mind and gentle heart, has died at his home in Rancho Mirage. The tunesmith whose "Swinging on a Star," "All the Way," "High Hopes" and "Call Me Irresponsible" not only won four Oscars but became national monuments, had celebrated his 77th birthday last month. He died Tuesday, a spokesman for the Riverside County coroner's office said Wednesday.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmy Van Heusen, who took his name from a shirt label and his melodies from a mirthful mind and gentle heart, has died at his home in Rancho Mirage. The tunesmith whose "Swinging on a Star," "All the Way," "High Hopes" and "Call Me Irresponsible" not only won four Oscars but became national monuments, had celebrated his 77th birthday last month. He died Tuesday, a spokesman for the Riverside County coroner's office said Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Christopher Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Among other things, the new musical "Robin and the 7 Hoods" is a love letter to composer Jimmy Van Heusen. On first glance it might seem an homage to Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack in their heyday, but it's Van Heusen's infectious melodies, found in "Come Fly With Me," "The Tender Trap," "Ain't That a Kick in the Head," "High Hopes" and 15 other tunes, that are the lifeblood of the effort. The show's music supervisor and vocal arranger, John McDaniel, listens to Van Heusen with an admiring ear. "His uptempo songs have a harmonic jazz beat," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Musical Valentine: The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers will present a tribute to the late Jimmy Van Heusen on Valentine's Day at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Among participants scheduled for the "All-Star Memorial Tribute" are Bob Hope, Donald O'Connor, Angie Dickinson, the Ray Charles Singers and Marilyn and Alan Bergman.
NEWS
March 25, 1987
The second annual Singers' Salute to the Songwriter at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on April 6 will raise funds for the Betty Clooney Foundation for the Brain Injured, a nonprofit organization serving those with traumatic head injuries. The Singers' Award for Legendary Song Composition will be given to Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Fain, Henry Mancini, Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager and Stevie Wonder. The Arranger's Award will go to Billy May.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | Marylouise Oates
"Next year," chairman Roz Wyman said, approaching Bev and Al Zacky. "Next year it can be Zacky Chickens Present the 'Betty Clooney Foundation Singers Salute the Songwriters Award.' And we'll put it on television." None of that seems surprising, especially after the curtain fell on the three-hour spectacular that played to a full house at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Monday night. Like love, the awards got better the second time around.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992 | DON HECKMAN
Mary Cleere Haran is to cabaret singing what Wolfgang Puck is to pizza. Put her in a place like the Rose Garden room--as she was for a special appearance Thursday--and Haran will bake up a collection of the tastiest music in the catalogue of great American songs. Justifiably acknowledged for her hip, off-the-wall, between-tunes humor in New York, where she has become a major cabaret star, Haran is unquestionably one of the wittiest performers ever to interrupt a punch line with a song.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1985 | David Fox
Quick, what do these names have in common: Jane Fonda, Ryan O'Neal, Harold Arlen, Nora Ephron, Marlene Dietrich, William Goldman, Sydney Pollack, Garson Kanin, Bella Abzug, Jimmy Van Heusen, Peter Bogdanovich, Ray Stark, Barry Gibb, Arthur Laurents, Jule Styne and Gloria Steinem? They're all lining up behind Barbra Streisand, who's said to be "livid" about a new and very unauthorized bio-book, "Barbra Streisand: The Woman, the Myth, the Music" (Delacorte Press; $17.95).
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jimmy Van Heusen, a Tin Pan Alley veteran who won four Academy Awards and composed such memorable tunes as "Love and Marriage" and "Swinging on a Star," has died at his desert home, it was announced today. He was 77. Van Heusen died Tuesday night of complications of pneumonia. His death was confirmed today by the Riverside County Coroner's Office. Most Americans can hum at least a few bars of several Van Heusen tunes--"High Hopes," "Call Me Irresponsible" and "All The Way."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
At Donte's, which is due to celebrate its 20th anniversary Oct. 24 (it's the second oldest jazz room in town, after Memory Lane), the perennial verities still hold good, as was demonstrated Wednesday by the appearance of the Herb Ellis Quartet. Ross Tompkins, the pianist in this ad hoc group, is known in local circles as "The Phantom," though the name could better be applied to Ellis, who plays only in his home town when he isn't in Europe or busy on some long cross country tour.
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